#1
About 2 months ago I bought new Fender strings, 1 month later my G string broke at the bridge and I thought it was just a malfunction or something, but today my D string broke exactly on the same place and now I want to know if I'm putting them wrong, if there's a problem with the bridge or if the strings are just bad quality. I searched in other forums and a lot of them were saying to look for burrs, burrs and more burrs, I've looke at my bridge and there's nothing.

Appreciate any help.
#2
Pull some string though the holes and see if it frays or gets stuck, if it does then you know there's a burr. If not then try better strings, I personally find Fender strings completely useless. Dunlop are my fav.
#3
Quote by 88Reaper88
Pull some string though the holes and see if it frays or gets stuck, if it does then you know there's a burr. If not then try better strings, I personally find Fender strings completely useless. Dunlop are my fav.


Exactly, Fender strings tend to suck. Personally I find D'addario strings the best value for money and DR best for tone.
Quote by Karl Marx
Reason has always existed, but not always in a reasonable form.
#4
String breakage at the bridge, in exactly the same spot, often indicates a sharp edge on the bridge saddle, or a too-severe angle between the tailpiece (or the hole in the body) and the bridge saddle. Have them both checked out. It is a pretty easy fix in either case.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#5
Thanks for the tips, and Fatalgear, can you post a pic. of what is the right angle, cause i'm not really sure about that.
#6
It is hard to find a picture of the "correct" angle at the bridge, since bridges are different. A decent rule of thumb is that anything more than 45 degrees is probably too steep. It will cause the strings to dig hard against the bridge saddle, and if the slot in that saddle is not well cut and smoothed, you will probably have a broken string in very short time. There has to be some angle, or else the strings would literally slide off of the bridge saddles (I have seen this happen with a few basses), but it should be just steep enough to keep the strings in place and create a focal point at the tip of the bridge saddle.

I will keep looking for a good bass picture. In the meantime:

Minimal string angle example:


About a 45-degree string angle:


Practically NO string angle at the bridge (this is a guitar with a Bigsby tremolo):
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"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley