#1
Hey guys, im starting a new job in the new year, and they have decided to pay me an extortionate amount of money so im going to celebrate by getting the guitar of my dreams (within reason).

now right now i have my heart set on a strandberg boden 7 or 8, it has pretty much everything i want.

but im hoping you guys can show me some other options.

I want a multi scale guitar with angled pick ups.

other than that im open to anything.

so far the strandberg is the only guitar i have seen that offers what im after.

I have thought about going completely custom, but i think ide have to go just a little bit higher to get what i want.

So any ideas?

Thanks, James
#2
Well honestly if you can afford that one and it truly is the guitar of your dreams, why buy something else? They seem pretty amazing...
#4
I kind of agree: I can name all kinds of stuff in that price range and beyond, from production models to custom luthiers.

But you say you want a Strandberg.

Even if I could point you at better guitars for the money, you'd probsbly be disappointed.

Or are you just kind of picking Strandberg because you've heard of them as being nice guitars?
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#5
Quote by OliveG
Have you seen the frets on that one ?? Very strange, is it me or they're not straight??

They're not- those are True Temperament Frets.

http://www.truetemperament.com/site/index.php
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Dec 22, 2013,
#7
I was going for strandberg because its pretty much a production model. And it comes with what i want. But i also dont like being limited to one choice so i was hoping there would be other options out there.

But also i have heard that the strandbergs are great guitars.
#8
Try looking at RAN guitars, they might have something you like.

Or maybe the Halo Guitars (I have seen alot of love and alot of hate for their production models, not so sure about the custom shop) custom shop. They have a builder and everything so you can have a visual representations.

Or, you could build the most expensive multiscale Agile guitar in existance
#9
Other good guitars in your price range:

Jaden Rose
Bowes
Jon Kammerer
Mayones
Ruokangas
Novax
Wes Lambe
MacPherson

Not all will offer everything you want standard, but it never hurts to ask.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Dec 23, 2013,
#10
Quote by wozzsta


I want a multi scale guitar with angled pick ups.


First, congratulations on your new job. My personal suggestion is to never buy anything expensive to celebrate a new job, pack away as much money as you can (build up a 10-12 month emergency fund) and pay only cash for toys -- never go into debt for them. There are other personal suggestions, such as Never Date A Woman Who Pees Standing Up, but those are for other occasions. And all based on personal experience, sadly.

A lot of multi scale (fan fret) guitars have angled pickups. Fan frets used to be expensive, available only from the high end custom and semi-custom builders. No longer.

There are other questions to be answered, including whether you want a trem or not (both Floyd and Kahler make trems that work). There's also the question of what scales you want to work with (24-27", 25-27", 27-28" or 27-30"), whether you want active/passive pickups and the number of strings.

Rondo Music has begun producing these in their Agile Pendulum series. These are likely the first reasonably priced fan-fret guitars, and I'm thinking that these will be the reason that more people will be playing fan fret guitars in the future. They have them available in both the aforementioned choices of scales, with or without Floyd or Kahler trems and in 7, 8 and 9-string versions. http://www.rondomusic.com/MultiScaleGuitars.html

If you're in the You Kay, maybe you shouldn't go look.

I haven't played a Strandberg (I'm in the US and not many of them have made it across the pond), but they certainly look promising on the website. If you haven't played a fan-fret, haven't actually played an 8-string or haven't played a Strandberg, you may want to reconsider how much money you're going to spend. You may want to see if it's really something you'll spend a lot of time with before you get in too deeply.

One final thing -- whenever you buy a new guitar, assume that you're going to have to give it a good initial setup (yeah, this includes even Strandbergs). I suggest factoring in enough money to have the thing PLEK'd and have the frets superglued.
Last edited by dspellman at Dec 23, 2013,
#12
Quote by dannyalcatraz
For that matter, Novax offers its Fanned Fret necks for sale as an inexpensive upgrade:

http://novaxguitars.com/parts-accessories/necks-guit.html


I've never seen those! Thanks for bringing them to our attention.

Notice one thing, however -- the scales on those necks pivot on the 12th fret.

That is, the 12th fret is perpendicular to the neck. A lot of purpose-built multiscale guitars pivot near the 7th fret. I assume the reason that Novax add-on necks use the 12th is that the bridge can only be adjusted so far and still be able to be intonated (in fact, the low E saddle needs to have a spring removed as it is). So bear in mind that this will produce a different-feeling guitar (and the ergonomics will be different) compared to purpose-built multi-scale guitars.
#13
Quote by dspellman
First, congratulations on your new job. My personal suggestion is to never buy anything expensive to celebrate a new job, pack away as much money as you can (build up a 10-12 month emergency fund) and pay only cash for toys -- never go into debt for them. There are other personal suggestions, such as Never Date A Woman Who Pees Standing Up, but those are for other occasions. And all based on personal experience, sadly.

A lot of multi scale (fan fret) guitars have angled pickups. Fan frets used to be expensive, available only from the high end custom and semi-custom builders. No longer.

There are other questions to be answered, including whether you want a trem or not (both Floyd and Kahler make trems that work). There's also the question of what scales you want to work with (24-27", 25-27", 27-28" or 27-30"), whether you want active/passive pickups and the number of strings.

Rondo Music has begun producing these in their Agile Pendulum series. These are likely the first reasonably priced fan-fret guitars, and I'm thinking that these will be the reason that more people will be playing fan fret guitars in the future. They have them available in both the aforementioned choices of scales, with or without Floyd or Kahler trems and in 7, 8 and 9-string versions. http://www.rondomusic.com/MultiScaleGuitars.html

If you're in the You Kay, maybe you shouldn't go look.

I haven't played a Strandberg (I'm in the US and not many of them have made it across the pond), but they certainly look promising on the website. If you haven't played a fan-fret, haven't actually played an 8-string or haven't played a Strandberg, you may want to reconsider how much money you're going to spend. You may want to see if it's really something you'll spend a lot of time with before you get in too deeply.

One final thing -- whenever you buy a new guitar, assume that you're going to have to give it a good initial setup (yeah, this includes even Strandbergs). I suggest factoring in enough money to have the thing PLEK'd and have the frets superglued.


Thanks, pick up choice isn't something that really bothers me, because ill be replacing them with a set of barekunckle pickups right away. And also, it will be hard-tailed because all of my guitars i have had so far have had trems, and over the last 10 years i have grown to have nothing but hate for them.

As for scale length ideally it will be somewhere in the region of 27" to 25.5" but there is a little leeway there.

The set up im perfectly capable of doing myself, i have stripped and set up all of my guitars over the last 7 or so years. This includes fret leveling and trusrod adjustments


I have played 7 strings before but ive never played fan fretted guitars before, but from what i have read it take very little getting used to and honestly i don't mind if the first few days/weeks are tricky because ide rather have the extra string tension on the low end strings.
#14
At your budget, and without going custom there are 2 obvious choices: The Boden from Strandberg and the Regius V-F multiscale. Both are extraordinary instruments made from revered custom shops. If you like the headless look and ABM bridge you go for the Boden. The Regius is more conventional as a design and can be ordered/purchased with BKPs installed.
#15
dang that Regius V-F multiscale is sexy as hell. hmm, i have just fired off a email to mayones.
#16
Forgive my ignorance but are they called multiscale because the scale changes from string to string?
#18
Quote by OliveG
Forgive my ignorance but are they called multiscale because the scale changes from string to string?


Right. It sounds more complicated that way. It's actually pretty easy to visualize, though.

A 27" scale stretches out the frets a bit further than a 25.5" (I think it's about 6%) -- so each fret has about 6% more distance between frets compared to the 25.5" scale.

If you take a piece of paper with the 27" scale spacing and put it next to a piece of paper with a 25.5" scale spacing, you'll see right away that they don't line up (Captain Obvious reporting, here).

So to build a fan fret guitar fretboard, you spread the two pieces of paper apart, about the distance of the fretboard from E to E. Then you decide which fret will be straight across. Usually that's about the 7th fret. The frets from 6 on down will tilt higher on the low side, the frets from 8 on up will tilt lower. The 7th fret is not a hard-and-fast rule, but it works pretty well for hand comfort. So you put the 7th fret line perpendicular to the line of the fretboard and then just scribe in all the rest of the frets from side to side, cut your fret slots and put in your frets. The nut will also tilt, as will the bridge (in the opposite direction), but it all fits this same basic formula. For a given pair of scales, you'll see less tilt with a wider fretboard (or more strings). But for an 8-string, for example, you may want to increase the scale on the bass end anyway, so it's not uncommon to see 28" and even 30" scales matched to a 25.5" scale on the treble side.

The nice thing about a fan fret guitar is that while it may LOOK more complicated, it turns out that it follows the way your hand would naturally tilt moving up and down the fretboard, so in many cases it's more comfortable and more natural to play.
Last edited by dspellman at Dec 24, 2013,
#19
First fanned-fret guitars I ever saw were played by California Guiar Trio. On their Pathways tour, they had a set of identical Somogyi's- very high-end acoustics- that were truly awesome to hear up close.

Then came Charlie Hunter...
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!