#1
Seems like my capo has a tendency to make notes go sharp. Anyone else having this issue? It's kind of a pain... if I fret the note by hand they're neither sharp nor flat. But the capo does that. It's a planet waves, one that you screw to tighten. It's not straight, it's got a slight curvature, but I'm careful to put it on straight. Seems like the closer it is to the fret the less sharp it is, but still, it's a littel sharp...
#2
Adjust the tension so it's just enough to make all the notes ring clear. You also might try positioning it in different spots between the frets.
--- Joe ---
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#3
A trick I've seen some professional musicians use, is to place the capo right over the fret. It works quite well, but makes things a little cramped for my hands. Another thing you can try... don't place the capo right next to the fret. Back it off a little towards the next fret down.
#4
I think I have the same capo as you. This one? http://elderly.com/accessories/items/images/ACC/NSDACAPO.jpg

Reduce the tension in the capo by unscrewing it. You shouldn't be putting in too much effort at all to open the capo. I have had zero issues with mine over the last couple years.
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#5
Check yo action and also intonation, could be the neck is set too high or your bridge is all ****ed up.
#6
I have a similar one, I've found that if the capo's screwed too tight it messes with the pitch. It can be screwed a little looser than you'd think and still press down on the strings enough. So I'd play with that first.
#7
It’s normal for the capo to make the guitar sharp. The closer you are to the nut the worse this will be. But the notes should all be sharp by the same amount, so the guitar will be in tune with itself and you can sing in tune with it.

If you’re using a capo to play along with recordings just detune the guitar slightly before using the capo.
#8
Quote by JelloCrust
Check yo action and also intonation, could be the neck is set too high or your bridge is all ****ed up.


Maybe. It's a reso and I'm wondering if it needs a setup...
#9
Quote by AWACS
I think I have the same capo as you. This one? http://elderly.com/accessories/items/images/ACC/NSDACAPO.jpg

Reduce the tension in the capo by unscrewing it. You shouldn't be putting in too much effort at all to open the capo. I have had zero issues with mine over the last couple years.


Almost, it's this one... I do try not to over tighten it. Just enough to get all the strings to contact the fret. The capo is slightly curved and my reso's fretboard is pretty flat... I tried another one, a simple one with a strap, it was about the same...
#10
Quote by OliveG
Maybe. It's a reso and I'm wondering if it needs a setup...


Nah -- most people put capos on in between frets. If you've got high action (sometimes even if you don't) the capo will pull the strings all the way down to the fretboard. That makes them go sharp. It's the same thing as when you have "Gorilla Grip" technique that pulls the strings down to the fretboard. You're only supposed to exert enough pressure to get the strings to touch the fret. The same goes for the capo -- if you put the capo very close to (or pretty much on) the fret, it won't pull the strings all the way to the fretboard, and so it won't pull them sharp.
#12
Check the type of neck on your guitar, some necks are flat and others are arched... if your capo is made for a guitar with a completely flat neck then it's not going to cover the fretboard properly same if it's the other way around.. take your guitar into a music shop, ask them what type of neck your guitar has and then get the correct capo.
#13
I have both actually (one flat and one curved). The curved one helps a little. But overall I think it's just my resonator's intonation that needs some work...
#14
I think the others covered things pretty well above, but I'll add a couple of comments. If the strings are too high, then fix the string action, then do that first. If you just fret the notes at the same point and see the notes go sharp (using a tuner), then your intonation is off and you should fix that next. When you put on the capo, use just enough pressure to get the string to touch the fret (and strings should ring free when not fretted). Now putting the capo on should be similar to doing a barre chord and should sound normal.

If you find everything just slightly sharp, then change the tuning after the capo is on. If the pressure isn't severe on the capo, it should be able to be retuned with it on. It's OK to tweak the tuning. If you want to perform and be taking the capo on/off, that could be a pain, so you'll need good action and intonation to avoid these problem.

If you have an old capo, the rubber might be stiff and make it difficult to get all the strings touching without a lot of pressure. Lastly, if you have a 12-string, then getting the thick/thin string pairs might be a problem (especially with old rubber) and you might need to carefully file a lot bit of the rubber over the thicker string in order to not need excessive pressure to have all strings make contact (or better, get a new capo at that point).