#1
Hello UG,

My mother dropped my guitar while cleaning, and from the outside, it looks fine. I even changed it from Standard E to drop C and it plays fine.

Except for the fact, that it goes out of tune approx. 30 seconds to 2 minutes after. A few hours after, the lower string C is almost a B.

This seems to have had the largest impact on the strings: CGC (EAD), while the rest go a little out of tune as well, it's nowhere as dramatic.

Here I am, in this dilemma, not sure what to do. Going to the guitar shop for diagnosis is very expensive and I really want to fix it myself if I can. Issue is, I don't know where it has been damaged (if thats the reason for it going out of tune). I mean, it's a floyd rose guitar. It usually stayed in tune for months, now, hardly a few seconds and it's out.

Thank you for reading, and I hope you have some suggestions I could try out.

Yours Sincerely,
FreakingBenjami
#2
Obviously your mother needs to buy you a brand new guitar of your choosing. :-D

Where was it dropped on? The neck? The body? On carpet or hard wood floors or **shudders** tiled floor?
#3
Quote by OliveG
Obviously your mother needs to buy you a brand new guitar of your choosing. :-D

Where was it dropped on? The neck? The body? On carpet or hard wood floors or **shudders** tiled floor?


Haha It was an accident, so it's all forgiven of course.

It was on a supreme stand, apparently, it has fallen with the front down. That means, (as the tremolo is a bit out), that the tremolo, neck and perhaps nuts have been damaged in the fall. The strings are very rusty, I will have to note that as well and it hasn't been good at tuning lately, but this is way worse than what it used to be.

My hypothesis is either that the accident triggered something, or that the accident has left minor damage and it is the problem with rusty strings.

I know it's hard to diagnose over the internet, but really, it doesn't have a single scratch so it's hard to tell what exactly happened.
#4
I guess I'd start by changing the strings (keeping in mind they'll take a little while to settle of course). Once they settle, see if that improves thing. Maybe some strings were 'slammed' a little loose on their pegs when it dropped? Seems like the highest impact velocity would have been at the headstock, with the body bottom the rotation point... I assume you carefully inspected it? If you hold it by the body with your eye about level with the bridge and you look at the headstock, does the neck look straight? What about the tuning pegs? Do they look like they got knocked loose a little? I'd take off each string one by one and replace it with a new one and before putting on a new one I'd inspect for example the nuts on the tuning pegs / shafts, see if one is loose...
#5
Quote by OliveG
I guess I'd start by changing the strings (keeping in mind they'll take a little while to settle of course). Once they settle, see if that improves thing. Maybe some strings were 'slammed' a little loose on their pegs when it dropped? Seems like the highest impact velocity would have been at the headstock, with the body bottom the rotation point... I assume you carefully inspected it? If you hold it by the body with your eye about level with the bridge and you look at the headstock, does the neck look straight? What about the tuning pegs? Do they look like they got knocked loose a little? I'd take off each string one by one and replace it with a new one and before putting on a new one I'd inspect for example the nuts on the tuning pegs / shafts, see if one is loose...


All right. At the moment, I focused on the headstock. This Ibanez seems to be of good quality, as I was shaking it aggressively, to see if the headstock was damaged, but it wouldn't give an inch. Thereafter, I inspected the tremolo. Stimulating it as much as possible, but I didn't encounter anything unusual.

This is kind of a relief. Perhaps, it's just the rusty strings which need a replacement.
#6
By the way. When I turn my amp on, it makes a huge screaming sound (Even when holding the strings tightly). It is usually silent however, does this mean the pickups have been damaged as well?
#7
Weird. I can't imagine the pickups being damaged by the fall, but maybe the solder on one connection snapped... you should probably open the cavity and check that out.
#8
I'd hazard a guess that's more likely your cable or your jack, not the pickups.
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#9
Quote by FreakingBenjami
By the way. When I turn my amp on, it makes a huge screaming sound (Even when holding the strings tightly). It is usually silent however, does this mean the pickups have been damaged as well?

Try different guitars, different cables, different amps (if possible). Plug guitar straight to the amp.

If you turn down your guitar volume knob, does it still scream? If yes, then it doesn't sound like it's the guitar's fault.
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