#2
Learn songs by ear. Don't use tabs.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
1. Learn songs by ear, start with simple powerchord riffs or melodies.

2. Create your own melody in your head and try to play it, doesn't matter much from what note you start, intervals are the most important.

There are other ways to do it, for example using a software like Ear Trainer, but these two methods are more efficient and definitively more fun.
#4
My advice:

Start, with your guitar, transcribing simple melodies that you already know by heart. Christmas carols and nursery rhmes are a good source of these melodies.

Use the functional ear trainer, a free download at miles.be.

Keep learning songs by ear, even when it's hard.

Get a book on ear training like "Ear Training for the Contemporary Musician" by Wyatt et al.
#5
Quote by HotspurJr
Get a book on ear training like "Ear Training for the Contemporary Musician" by Wyatt et al.


Could I get that at local music stores?

Edit: I don't think the music store I've gone to a few times is local, but it's not a big store, either.
Last edited by Lifesign at Dec 24, 2013,
#6
Quote by coVal
2. Create your own melody in your head and try to play it, doesn't matter much from what note you start, intervals are the most important.


Easier said than done. I've had this one melody in my mind for months and the few times I've tried to get it out on guitar, I get nothing like it.
#7
As far as intervals, I'd recommend mapping them out with songs. For example - The first two notes of Led Zep's 'Heartbreaker' are a minor 3rd apart, so when training my ear I would use that riff as a reference for the sound of the b3.

Other examples include the Jaws theme (dominated by a minor 2nd interval) or Sepultura's 'Roots Bloody Roots' (a diminished 5th interval) - stuff like this works for pretty much any style whatsoever, so you really can choose whatever as long as the interval is right.

Give it a try - it worked so well for me that I used a similar method for note recognition, which worked pretty well too!
I was bad with usernames at age 12. Ah woe.
#8
Quote by Lifesign
Could I get that at local music stores?

Edit: I don't think the music store I've gone to a few times is local, but it's not a big store, either.


Probably. It's not an obscure book. Or get it off Amazon.
#9
The way I did it was by slowing down a song and figuring it out by ear instead of using a tab. There are free softwares out there that can do this; Best Practice for example is very easy to use. Audacity is a bit less easy but still easy enough to get the hang of, and it's much more versatile, but either one works.

Also, isolating the guitar track will make it easier. An easy way to get an isolated track is to look for very popular songs, popular enough to be featured in the guitar hero series of games - for example, pretty much every metallica hit. Search on youtube for, say, "master of puppets guitar track" and download it (search on google free youtube download, you don't even need to use a program for this). Take the track and open it with an editing software (I recommend audacity, it's very useful, but best practice will do too, or whichever other you want) and slow it down.

Try to match your guitar to the track, and don't try to tackle the whole song at once; take the first few opening notes, and try to match them on your guitar one for one. If it's hard, a fast passage or whatever, slow it down and try to do it bit by bit.
#10
I started ear training by doing simple songs like children's songs or something. The ABC song really helped me.
#11
Learning songs by ear is where most people start

The important thing to remember about ear training is that singing is a huge part of it. Dont worry about your vocal quality, just the accuracy of your pitch

Try starting with the major scale. Play a drone on your guitar and try to sing a major scale over it. Rinse and repeat with different drones and different scales. Try silly things like droning a C and singing a Db major scale. You can also do this with chords. Want a really crazy exercise? Try singing up a chord, and then singing back down a different chord. For instance, sing up a C7 chord. When you arrive at Bb, begin to descend a Gb major chord in 2nd inversion so that you end on Db

Also, intervals are hugely important. Pick an interval to practice. Play a note on your guitar, and then sing the interval you are trying to hear. You can also practice this by singing both pitches

Finally, try interval cycles. An interval cycle is merely the same interval stacked on top of itself. The simplest example of an interval cycle is a chromatic scale (a half step on top of a half step on top of a half step...). A whole tone scale is also an interval cycle. A diminished chord is an interval cycle of either minor thirds or major sixths. Augmented chords are interval cycles of either major thirds or minor sixths
#12
Avoid using tabs at all cost and listen to a song and try and match the pitches you're looking to play by ear. SING the notes that your HEARING and then PLAY what you HEAR. this is something that I teach to all my students. Even if you hear a melody or whatever it is in your head. SING what you HEAR FIRST. Then PLAY it exactly how you're singing it. Some simple songs to get a good understanding of how this works is "Crazy Train" or "Back in Black" or even "Black Dog".
#13
i'd check out Chrisco_Madness Ear Training Resource Guide.

The Ear Training Resource Guide

http://www.reddit.com/r/musictheory/comments/1mde7c/the_ear_training_resource_guide/

you're gonna find a ton of current ear training resources for teaching yourself how to practice ear training on your own!

Functional Ear Trainer is good, but it's not the end all of ear training. There is so much more to explore with ear training. I'd check out that guide first
#14
bit of an old thread but whatever.

sing everything you play. there is no more efficient way to internalize music than by singing it.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#15
Start learning easy songs. You'll hopefully get the hang of it eventually. The first thing I learned by ear was the solo to More Than A Feeling. Once you get the hang of blindly trying to find notes, you'll start to notice keys, intervals, chords, and scales by just listening to a song.