#1
Hi,
first post here, but regularly use the Tabs...

I recently acquired a BC Rich Stealth Chuck Schuldiner Tribute, which I've been after for ages and while it sounds amazing, I find it very hard to hold.

The neck is thick and much heavier than the body, so I have to hold the neck up, as well as play it.

Does anyone have any tips as to how to hold a heavy necked guitar?

Cheers,

Antony
#2
Classical posture will work well with that guitar as it has a V shaped body and two additional cut-away horns. It can be held in place by locking the right leg around the bottom horn to remove all weight distribution from the hands.
#3
Not a lot of experience with heavy necked guitars, but I have played a Thunderbird Bass or 2. You talking about sitting down or standing up? That guitar seems to be very small in the body department, there's nothing to it. Where are the strap buttons? Maybe moving them would be the answer. Putting the back one further out on the upper horn? I found with my Explorers that they stay put much better with the forward strap button on the neck heel instead of the upper bout. When sitting, maybe put the end over your leg, like people do when sitting with a flying v.
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http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQE6mNWoSy6TChrYj6cYIwQG-FzTH4RoG_7pjyXj5j8ue5DayijoA
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#4
You are talking about standing up right? These kinds of guitars tend to be neck heavy but in case of Stealth chuck tribute the biggest problem is that the location of the strap button is wrong. Its too far up the long wing. There is a picture comparison of the mass produced tribute and the real custom one and you will notice that in custom the button is much closer to the center.

Since i am not home and writing this on phone i cant be arsed to find it now, but for reference just look at some jackson rhoads guitars and notice where the rear strap button is. Its very close to the bottom of the V shape. This puts more weight to the opposite side of the guitar to balance the neck a bit. Relocate the button (if you have the guts) and put a good stiff leather strap on it and it will be fine.

If you do not wish to mod your guitar there are straps where you can attach weights on to pull the neck up. If you mod google bc rich stealth relocating strap buttons for more details before doing anything drastic. It has been done before and people have posted about it.

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Dec 24, 2013,
#5
Get a nice leather strap with the rough grain on the back. That will help keep it in position by griping your clothes. Avoid using nylon straps like the ones Ernie Ball sells. They are really slippery and make even the slightest off balanced guitars seem extremely off balanced. Siting shouldn't be an issue at all with that guitar with the way it's shaped.
#6
Quote by macaroni205
Hi,

Does anyone have any tips as to how to hold a heavy necked guitar?



Rule #1: Never buy a neck-heavy guitar. You end up supporting the neck with your fretting hand; never a great way to go.

Rule #2: If you have a neck-heavy guitar, never listen to the folks who tell you to get a "grippy" strap. You end up with your shirt rucked up in the back and you're *still* supporting the neck with your hand.

Rule #3: If you can't relocate the strap satisfactorily (you might actually consider running a piece of black cord to the headstock, ala the old acoustic guitar straps), then add weight to the strap or the guitar near the bottom of the guitar to balance it.

On one notoriously neck-heavy SG, we drilled a hole into the edge of the bottom of the body and inserted a tungsten slug, then put a mahogany plug over that and refinished that area. Very difficult to tell anything had been done. More importantly, it *fixed the problem." Another option is to simply fill a small bag with enough lead weights to balance the neck, hang it off the bottom strap button and then find away to disguise it as something rock and roll. One company (no longer around) called Neckheavy.com had a small plastic box filled with weight that displaced the bottom strap button maybe an inch. Worked.
#7
Quote by dspellman
Rule #1: Never buy a neck-heavy guitar. You end up supporting the neck with your fretting hand; never a great way to go.

Rule #2: If you have a neck-heavy guitar, never listen to the folks who tell you to get a "grippy" strap. You end up with your shirt rucked up in the back and you're *still* supporting the neck with your hand.

Rule #3: If you can't relocate the strap satisfactorily (you might actually consider running a piece of black cord to the headstock, ala the old acoustic guitar straps), then add weight to the strap or the guitar near the bottom of the guitar to balance it.

On one notoriously neck-heavy SG, we drilled a hole into the edge of the bottom of the body and inserted a tungsten slug, then put a mahogany plug over that and refinished that area. Very difficult to tell anything had been done. More importantly, it *fixed the problem." Another option is to simply fill a small bag with enough lead weights to balance the neck, hang it off the bottom strap button and then find away to disguise it as something rock and roll. One company (no longer around) called Neckheavy.com had a small plastic box filled with weight that displaced the bottom strap button maybe an inch. Worked.


Considering that every off balanced guitar I'v ever encountered (in the past 25 or more years) was remedied with a good rough back leather strap and never caused any issues with my clothes. This is one solid piece of advice. The last thing lots of people wan't to do is mod their guitars and be relocating strap buttons. Unless they have no other choice, I consider that a last resort. The strap may not work in some cases but it does work in a lot. So to say never listen to people that offer that advice is just silly an naive. But whatever you say all mighty dspellman
Last edited by Way Cool JR. at Dec 24, 2013,
#8
Quote by dspellman
Rule #1: Never buy a neck-heavy guitar. You end up supporting the neck with your fretting hand; never a great way to go.

Rule #2: If you have a neck-heavy guitar, never listen to the folks who tell you to get a "grippy" strap. You end up with your shirt rucked up in the back and you're *still* supporting the neck with your hand.

Rule #3: If you can't relocate the strap satisfactorily (you might actually consider running a piece of black cord to the headstock, ala the old acoustic guitar straps), then add weight to the strap or the guitar near the bottom of the guitar to balance it.

On one notoriously neck-heavy SG, we drilled a hole into the edge of the bottom of the body and inserted a tungsten slug, then put a mahogany plug over that and refinished that area. Very difficult to tell anything had been done. More importantly, it *fixed the problem." Another option is to simply fill a small bag with enough lead weights to balance the neck, hang it off the bottom strap button and then find away to disguise it as something rock and roll. One company (no longer around) called Neckheavy.com had a small plastic box filled with weight that displaced the bottom strap button maybe an inch. Worked.

You forgot rule #4 Don't be a Pussy

SG's are one of the most comfy guitars I have played even with the neck dive issues. I like them just fine and have no problems at all
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#9
Wow, thanks for the advice guys.

I am talking about playing it standing up, sitting down is just fine but not very "death metal".

I am also using a slippy vinyl strap, so I'm getting it all wrong!

First job - get a grippy strap, then think about relocating the strap buttons and I'll talk to my guitar shop about getting some weights.

I know I should stick to my LP copy which is beautifully balanced, but I love the sound of the Stealth for playing the darker side of my repertoire.

Thanks again for all your help.

Antony
#10
macaroni205

The only reason you're experiencing difficulties is because of the neck. It tilts to the ground because of its weight, which is called "neck dive". You can stop it by putting small weights or something heavy in the back compartment (where the wiring is) of the guitar. It sounds weird, but it's a lot better than possibly ruining the guitar by moving the strap locks.