#1
hey guys

what exactly is an FX loop and how do you 'create' one? sorry for the newb question but I'm a bit new to this and most people i know seem to use one. I know that you require an amp with an FX input and output to create one...is it just a different 'circuit' of pedals one uses to make certain effects sound 'sharper' or more clearly than if they were all connected in series to the amp? Which pedals are classically put in the loop? And do you simply choose the pedals you want, connect them to each other and then into the amp FX output and input? (somehow this feels like a stupidly basic question which I should know so bear with me )

also Merry Christmas!
A Muse man through and through ...



bite me
#2
FX is just a short way of saying "effects". Simply put, an effects loop on an amp can be serial (series) or parallel. When it's in series, it's a loop that will usually be placed after the pre-amp and before the power-amp section of the amplifier. Parallel loops usually work alongside the pre-amp and create a separate signal path that leads into the power-amp. Serial loops are more common in guitar amps.

What does any of this mean? Some effects like volume, modulation (these are your chorus, flangers, phasers etc.), delays and reverbs will typically go into the serial effects loop. This is because the pre-amp section of the amp plays the part in creating the gain/drive/distortion and some of these effects don't sound desirable when putting them before distortion.

Reverb and delay becomes a washy mess when put before an amp rather than the loop, but this is a desirable sound for some and there is no wrong or right way to do it.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
Last edited by Lavatain at Dec 24, 2013,
#3
Quote by KnightOfCyd
hey guys

what exactly is an FX loop and how do you 'create' one? sorry for the newb question but I'm a bit new to this and most people i know seem to use one. I know that you require an amp with an FX input and output to create one...is it just a different 'circuit' of pedals one uses to make certain effects sound 'sharper' or more clearly than if they were all connected in series to the amp? Which pedals are classically put in the loop? And do you simply choose the pedals you want, connect them to each other and then into the amp FX output and input? (somehow this feels like a stupidly basic question which I should know so bear with me )

also Merry Christmas!


it's a way of placing effects after an amp's preamp section. some people prefer to put some effects after the amp's preamp/distortion.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#4
ah i see so basically (in extremely simplistic terms) it allows the effects of certain pedals like delay and reverb to project their signal through without effects like distortion or OD or the others you mentioned 'interfering?'

Cheers for the help
A Muse man through and through ...



bite me
#5
Quote by KnightOfCyd
ah i see so basically (in extremely simplistic terms) it allows the effects of certain pedals like delay and reverb to project their signal through without effects like distortion or OD or the others you mentioned 'interfering?'

Cheers for the help


you can place pedal effects like delay or reverb after the distortion of the amp.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#6
An FX loop *generally* works between the preamp of the guitar amp and the power amp side of the guitar amp.

A serial loop takes everything from the preamp and funnels it into the loop and from there into the power amp, so that everything is modified by whatever FX you have in the loop.

Sometimes, however, you want to do something more subtle. So in this case the preamp divides things and sends a signal directly to the power amp AND allows you to have a loop that adds some FX. A parallel loop offers two paths from the preamp to the power amp. One path is a direct connection from the preamp to the power amp as if the amp had no loop at all (a dry signal). The other path sends the preamp signal to the effect processor (via the loop) and then routes it back to the power amp, mixing it with the direct (dry) signal. Most amps that offer a parallel effects loop have a variable mix knob, so that you can control how much of the effect you want mixed in with the dry signal.

Now wait, it can get even better, particularly when you have multiple channels (clean/dirty).

I have one preamp, a Carvin Quad-X, that has four separate channels, each with a different FX loop that runs back into that particular channel. You can switch these FX loops in or out for each channel.

From there, you get BOTH a serial and a parallel FX channel that runs from the preamp to the power amp output. Even better, you can switch either of those other two FX loops into or out of the individual channels as well. And, of course, you can switch between the channels...the options are crazy. A total of six separate FX loops.
Last edited by dspellman at Dec 24, 2013,
#7
ahhh yeah ok it's making more sense now. might tweak around a bit and see what happens cheers guys much appreciated
A Muse man through and through ...



bite me