#1
I remember an arpeggio on a guitar as each individual note of one chord being played one at a time.

so what is a bass arpeggio then?
#3
i know whats an arpeggio i want to know whats a bass arpeggio, anyone else?
#4
A bass arpeggio, is an arpeggio, played on the bass. It is possible to play chords on the bass as well, y'know?
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#5
What?1!?!?!? you don't have to play root notes in 16ths????
Or is there more to this question then we realise.
#6
Quote by Jack69
i know whats an arpeggio i want to know whats a bass arpeggio, anyone else?



The bass arpeggio is an elusive creature that lives on the remote Indonesian islands knows as Whawha-Giugiu. It is known for it's wide vocal range, and appetite for coconuts.
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#7
There isn't a difference. A note is a note is a note. Doesn't matter if it's on a guitar, a bass, a saxophone, or a kazoo.

Quote by Fishybones
The bass arpeggio is an elusive creature that lives on the remote Indonesian islands knows as Whawha-Giugiu. It is known for it's wide vocal range, and appetite for coconuts.

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#9
I really want to a vuvuzela arpeggio. That shit has to be so musically astounding that it might kill people.


Quote by Deliriumbassist
Look ma! I maded a musicianship joke!


*Beholds the joke*

Ehh.
Gear:


Fender American Hand Stained stratocaster
Fender 72' Telecaster Deluxe FSR

Squier Vista Venus

Boss TU-3
Boss OD-3
Pro co Rat 2
EHX Big Muff Nano
EHX Small clone
Boss DD7
Hardwire Supernatural


Vox AC30cc1
Blackheart Little Giant stack
#10
E major arpeggio on bass:

G|-------1-
D|-----2---
A|---2-----
E|-0-------


It's exactly the same as on guitar.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
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Laney VC30
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#11
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Wow. And I thought bassists were good at reading.


We are...as long as it is the label on a whiskey bottle.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#12
An arpeggio is just a sequence of chord notes. A,C#,E for example. when you hold down a chord on a guitar you are 'automatically' holding down the strings to just make these notes so when you play them it is an arpeggio but play the same notes by moving your fingers and they are still the same notes in the same order and still an arpeggio.

On the bass we mainly play arpeggios by fretting strings independently by walking across the fretboard but as someone pointed out you could hold down a chord on a bass too.

Arpeggios give a particular sound to a bass line. Listen to Crazy Little Thing Called Love by Queen and you'll recognise it.

People learn arpeggios independently of songs because when you are playing bass you need to find the other scale notes easily and learning arpeggios gets the notes under your fingers efficiently.

Hope this helps
#13
Quote by eddiehimself
A bass arpeggio, is an arpeggio, played on the bass. It is possible to play chords on the bass as well, y'know?


I did and I didn't know that chords can be played on the bass. I'll explain.

The only chords I know on the bass are power chords which I think are also known as 5th chords or as "drone" chords.

Can you give me an example of other types of chords the bass guitar can play? Or is it literally any chord formation so long as it sounds good?

Thank you.
#14
Quote by MaggaraMarine
E major arpeggio on bass:

G|-------1-
D|-----2---
A|---2-----
E|-0-------


It's exactly the same as on guitar.


I thought so, thanks for confirming this for me
#15
Quote by Phil Starr
An arpeggio is just a sequence of chord notes. A,C#,E for example. when you hold down a chord on a guitar you are 'automatically' holding down the strings to just make these notes so when you play them it is an arpeggio but play the same notes by moving your fingers and they are still the same notes in the same order and still an arpeggio.

On the bass we mainly play arpeggios by fretting strings independently by walking across the fretboard but as someone pointed out you could hold down a chord on a bass too.

Arpeggios give a particular sound to a bass line. Listen to Crazy Little Thing Called Love by Queen and you'll recognise it.

People learn arpeggios independently of songs because when you are playing bass you need to find the other scale notes easily and learning arpeggios gets the notes under your fingers efficiently.

Hope this helps


Thanks for this information. It answered an underlining question, what is it used for?

I practice a few scales a day, mainly the major, chromatic and pentatonic and I will
now learn the notes of the important chords and try to memorise their make up in order to help me identify other scale notes easily.

I'm currently listening to that Queen song you said and it strikes me as a "walking bassline." I do not know what this means apart from the obvious implication you can gather from the term.

So then let me ask you this, are walking basslines created from arpeggios? I'm guessing yes.

Thank you
#16
You need to check up on your music theory. It doesn't suddenly change from one instrument to another. A G Major chord has identical notes regardless of whether you are playing guitar, bass, keyboard or whatever instrument you choose.
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#17
If you are like me, you don't pay much attention to theory. As a metalcore bassist, I play by what sounds and feels good. Upon looking up the definition of arpeggio, I realized I use these all the time (especially in my fillers), I just didn't know that there was a name for it.
#18
Examples of some bass arpeggios:

"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#19
Quote by Jack69

I'm currently listening to that Queen song you said and it strikes me as a "walking bassline." I do not know what this means apart from the obvious implication you can gather from the term.

So then let me ask you this, are walking basslines created from arpeggios? I'm guessing yes.

Thank you


Glad I could help. I'm only so-so on theory so don't take this as gospel.

Most walking bass lines use arpeggios, and though they don't necessarily always play the notes in strict order the walking feel does come from a steady walk up or down. Just playing arpeggios is more of a rock'n'roll thing, and for me that isn't quite enough to call it a walking bass line, though it kids most people. The added element to turn this into a walking bass line is the passing note, the last note of the bar is a note in the next chord in the chord sequence.

Typically this will be an eighth beat and the major or minor 7th of the next chord. So if you are counting it's; one, two, three, four, and ....with the note you play on 'and' being the first note in the next chord. Different players have different tricks to make it walk and some build on the walking bass line so it is hard to say when it starts or finishes so it becomes a question of feel rather than definition.

when called on to walk a bass line I 'cheat' by just playing arpeggios and adding the occasional semitone slide up to the root note of the next chord. So far it has fooled all of the people all of the time
#20
Learn the chord tones and play them one at the time - there you go, an arpeggio. You don't need to play all notes at once to call it a chord. If you play them one at the time, you are playing an arpeggio of that chord. As I said in my first post, this is an E major arpeggio:


G|-------1-
D|-----2---
A|---2-----
E|-0-------

This is also an E major arpeggio:

G|---------
D|-------2-
A|-----2---
E|-0-4-----


Play them all at once and you are playing a chord. It may not sound great at lower register but usually when bass plays chords, they are played in higher register.

This is an E7 chord:

G|-1--
D|-0--
A|-2--
E|-0--


To make it sound less muddy, you could play it higher and omit some notes. But chords usually sound pretty muddy on bass - that's why chords aren't used that often, and if they are, they are usually power chords. It's the same reason as why power chords are used on guitar - when you play with distortion, it gets muddy pretty easily.

For example these are E7 chords:

G|-13----7-----
D|-12----6-----
A|-------7-----
E|-12----------


And yeah, a walking bassline is where the notes are changing all the time. As Phil said, usually walking basslines are just chord tones and some chromatic notes. And when you play chord tones, you are playing arpeggios. The basic rock'n'roll bass riff:

G|-----------------
D|-----------------
A|-----2-4-5-4-2---
E|-0-4-----------4-


It's actually an E7 arpeggio with a major 6th.

And yeah, chords, arpeggios and notes are the same, no matter what instrument you play. Music theory applies to all instruments. So you can also play arpeggios on a saxophone or whatever instrument you want.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 27, 2013,
#21
Quote by NeverIsNow
If you are like me, you don't pay much attention to theory. As a metalcore bassist, I play by what sounds and feels good. Upon looking up the definition of arpeggio, I realized I use these all the time (especially in my fillers), I just didn't know that there was a name for it.


Is filler akin to a drum fill?
#22
Quote by FatalGear41
Examples of some bass arpeggios:



Thank you for this very handy and helpful illustration. I'm going to practise them right now.

#23
Quote by Phil Starr
Glad I could help. I'm only so-so on theory so don't take this as gospel.

Most walking bass lines use arpeggios, and though they don't necessarily always play the notes in strict order the walking feel does come from a steady walk up or down. Just playing arpeggios is more of a rock'n'roll thing, and for me that isn't quite enough to call it a walking bass line, though it kids most people. The added element to turn this into a walking bass line is the passing note, the last note of the bar is a note in the next chord in the chord sequence.

Typically this will be an eighth beat and the major or minor 7th of the next chord. So if you are counting it's; one, two, three, four, and ....with the note you play on 'and' being the first note in the next chord. Different players have different tricks to make it walk and some build on the walking bass line so it is hard to say when it starts or finishes so it becomes a question of feel rather than definition.

when called on to walk a bass line I 'cheat' by just playing arpeggios and adding the occasional semitone slide up to the root note of the next chord. So far it has fooled all of the people all of the time


Thanks for this information!
#24
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Learn the chord tones and play them one at the time - there you go, an arpeggio. You don't need to play all notes at once to call it a chord. If you play them one at the time, you are playing an arpeggio of that chord. As I said in my first post, this is an E major arpeggio:


G|-------1-
D|-----2---
A|---2-----
E|-0-------

This is also an E major arpeggio:

G|---------
D|-------2-
A|-----2---
E|-0-4-----


Play them all at once and you are playing a chord. It may not sound great at lower register but usually when bass plays chords, they are played in higher register.

This is an E7 chord:

G|-1--
D|-0--
A|-2--
E|-0--


To make it sound less muddy, you could play it higher and omit some notes. But chords usually sound pretty muddy on bass - that's why chords aren't used that often, and if they are, they are usually power chords. It's the same reason as why power chords are used on guitar - when you play with distortion, it gets muddy pretty easily.

For example these are E7 chords:

G|-13----7-----
D|-12----6-----
A|-------7-----
E|-12----------


And yeah, a walking bassline is where the notes are changing all the time. As Phil said, usually walking basslines are just chord tones and some chromatic notes. And when you play chord tones, you are playing arpeggios. The basic rock'n'roll bass riff:

G|-----------------
D|-----------------
A|-----2-4-5-4-2---
E|-0-4-----------4-


It's actually an E7 arpeggio with a major 6th.

And yeah, chords, arpeggios and notes are the same, no matter what instrument you play. Music theory applies to all instruments. So you can also play arpeggios on a saxophone or whatever instrument you want.


Thank you very much for this information. This was really educational for me. I will practise those notes you have displayed.
Last edited by Jack69 at Dec 27, 2013,
#25
Quote by Jack69
Thank you very much for this information. This was really educational for me. I will practise those notes you have displayed.

Yeah, but also remember to learn other arpeggios than just E major and E7. They were just examples.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#26
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yeah, but also remember to learn other arpeggios than just E major and E7. They were just examples.


Definitely! Lucky for me I played lead guitar for 3 years and still remember alot of the chords so that should translate directly onto the bass.

thanks again for your advice
#27
I always thought a Bass Arpeggio was an Italian seafood pasta dish.
Spare a Cow
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#28
Want to see how arpeggios are used in bass lines? Listen to the bass line for Back on the Chain Gang by the Pretenders. Heavy use of apreggiios