#1
I have a pretty large disparity between my guitar and amp, at the moment, and I was wondering if this was an absolute waste. Quite often I hear people talk about not playing a nice guitar through a cheap amp, and I'm pretty sure I'm doing just that. On the other hand, my playing is no good right now, so no matter what, I probably won't be able to make my guitar and amp shine. I struggle to do even basic pulloffs! (Damn interdependent fingers.)

I need some direction. Thanks.
#2
If you're still learning, then you don't need to worry about it. A cheap practice amp like yours is fine for that.

When your competency grows and you start thinking about how you actually sound, then a new amp should be your first priority.
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#3
Quote by GaryBillington
If you're still learning, then you don't need to worry about it. A cheap practice amp like yours is fine for that.

When your competency grows and you start thinking about how you actually sound, then a new amp should be your first priority.


agree. worry about learning to play and just tinker with the sound that is a learning experience in it self. will that amp make your guitar sound as good as it can no but as mentioned for practice as a beginner no biggie.
#4
I would say it's not the most advisable, but if you're stuck with it it's okay. At least you have a guitar that feels nice to play (I assume).
And the matter that your playing isn't that good probably means you should put buying a new amp on hold anyway.
#5
stick it out for a year, if you're still playing regularly then consider a better amp then.

I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#6
Well, having a better amp will make you want to play more and will give you that sweet feeling of "man, that is actually starting to sound pretty well!".

If i were you i'd pump money into a new amp, just because it's so much fun. But it's pure personal choice.
#7
Until your better and have a more discerning ear I'd stick with what you've got. Sounds like you have a nice guitar which will aid more in learning than an amp will as the playability and feel should be good.

People bad mouth the spider amps a lot here but it's a hell of a lot better than most of the small amps most we all started out on 10+ years ago. (Fender Frontman 10 watt solid state anyone?, 2 different sounds - clean and dirty, and neither one any good).
#8
Excellent advice already posted.
Make the fingers work. Otherwise it will be your guitar that will be an absolute waste <G>.
#9
Quote by GaryBillington
If you're still learning, then you don't need to worry about it. A cheap practice amp like yours is fine for that.

When your competency grows and you start thinking about how you actually sound, then a new amp should be your first priority.


+1

it's fine, don't worry about it.
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#10
While lots will say that the amp is more important, you're learning on the guitar and one that you love will always drive you more than an amp.

No one watched Jimi and said 'Ohhhh I want a Plexi, so sexy!' before they had picked up a guitar, they always went straight for the Strat!

But good tone will also motivate you and you would be able to notice a difference between a good amp and a cheaper amp. Like others have said, there's no rush, but I would definitely look into other amps. Plus, reading about them will do nothing but educate you.
#11
Motivation is no problem. I try to play at least three hours a day, and it's not unheard of for me to play 5 or 6. Motivation is no problem.

I'll stick with my current set up, and save up, and maybe in a year I'll buy a beast.

Thanks a ton!
#12
Quote by JakeFrmStatFarm
Motivation is no problem. I try to play at least three hours a day, and it's not unheard of for me to play 5 or 6. Motivation is no problem.

I'll stick with my current set up, and save up, and maybe in a year I'll buy a beast.

Thanks a ton!


that's the spirit. as I said before you can work on getting the best sound out of your amp as you can. as long as you have realistic expectations then you should be fine. I learned using a way crappier amp than that (in the late 70s).
#13
I'd recommend going to Guitar Center/Sam Ash and trying out different amps and looking at what your options are, but not buying anything right away. Eventually you'll be 100% sure of what you want/need and will make a good decision when the right time comes.
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