#1
I'm looking to buy some headphones to use with my guitar amp, any suggestions?

Main features I want

Over Ear
Sturdy cord (or a jack in the phones for an aux cable)
the response for a guitar.
Someone is wrong on the internet. Only you can help.

Originally Posted by Tulkas
Stairway is required on any list of anything involving the words guitar or song, I believe Congress amended the constitution in order to put it into federal law.
#2
As far as I know, there's no such thing.

Headphones are designed to do a completely different thing, ya know.
There are things marketed as guitar headphones, but they are just (theoretically) flat response, passively insulated closed headphones meant to be used on stage for monitoring.

Best you can do is get yourself an EQ and try to mimic the response curve of a speaker of your likings (you can find them on the manufacturers' websites).
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#3
How are you planning on using these headphones? Where are you wanting to plug them in?

If it's an actual headphone out, you should just get some decent headphones and not worry about their response relative to a guitar amp (my recommendation is Sennheiser HD380 pros, I own a pair and love them for the price)

If it's anything else it's probably not going to work!
#4
Quote by tim_mop
If it's an actual headphone out, you should just get some decent headphones and not worry about their response relative to a guitar amp
But flat response headphones will sound awful as soon as you engage a distortion of any kind...
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#5
Depends on what you want to spend. I have a pair of AKG K44 I use with my POD XT for silent practice and they sound just fine. I thing www.guitarcenter.com has them on sale for $19 right now
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#6
But the POD also has cabinet simulation, which is the main thing.
If OP's using some kind of modeling stuff, for good reference headphones I'd advise buying Sony MDR7506/7510, but maybe he's using something like a line out thing.
That's not a way to make this kinda things sound good.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#7
Quote by Spambot_2
But flat response headphones will sound awful as soon as you engage a distortion of any kind...

Lest anyone think you might have been serious - headphones are for listening to music. Music sometimes contains distorted guitars. If you're talking about distorting the drivers in the headphones themselves, that's called clipping, and yes, that does sound bad, but it is done by overdriving them by inputting too high a signal, and you won't be doing that by simply engaging distortion in front of an amp with a headphone output, or in the case of a POD, in the unit itself.

There's no need for flat-response headphones unless you plan to use them at some point in the process of mixing a recording. Even then, you don't want to rely on them for making critical decisions. Just buy some headphones that are comfortable and sound good to you.

The only consideration you might want to think about is closed vs open back. The difference being that open back willl bleed sound outward at higher levels while closed back will not. This is really only a concern if you are using them for monitoring while singing into a sensitive microphone.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
Last edited by Vulcan at Dec 28, 2013,
#8
I was pretty serious actually

Starting from the beginning,
the distorted guitars contained in music aren't distorted guitars alone - there's a physical signal chain ending with one or more mics in front of one or more cabs.
Clipping is something that usually occurs when you overload stuff with too much signal, so engaging a distortion or turning up the volume of an amp too much actually results in clipping distortion, and the way tubes clip your signal is one of the reasons they are preferred to transistors.

http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/Spambot_2/music/all/play1237617
That's an example of how cabs affect your sound, and how a guitar track sounds without one, so using the "line out" thing on your amp (if that's what OP's planning to do) will result in the DI signal coming through.

Headphones are usually designed to make audio sound good; thing is, it can be done good and it can be done bad, and the cheap plastic headphones you get with your android phone do that bad not being able to adequately reproduce bass, and not being able to reproduce sub-bass at all usually.
Beats headphones are designed to give you a ****in' lot of bass, which a lot of people like.
That does, however, alter the audio you're listening to in a pretty ****in' big way.
If the audio is mixed good, it's mixed to sound decently at least on cheap ass earbuds and stuff similar to that, but it's also mixed with good quality stuff, providing a flat response, so though HI-FI speakers and headphones usually color your sound a bit to make it sound a bit more pleasant, some prefer the flat response of reference headphones.

I'm with you about the open vs closed design thing.
Also, take into consideration that if some people is there you'll probably not awake them, but they'll most likely hear you even if you're not playing at high volume levels.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#9
Vulcan, spambot is perfectly right: his point is that hearing a guitar sound before a cabinet isn't going to work, because the cabinet alters frequencies that don't work well with guitar, and with distorted sounds it gets really unpleasant. Your example doesn't fit, because the sound you hear in your headphones has already flowed through a cabinet simulator or a real cabinet.

Long story short for the op: if your amp has no "headphone out" or "direct output" you have to get a speaker simulator as well. Regarding the headphones, i think some AKGs are a good compromise in terms of budget.
#10
Uh oh. I think the OP better clarify exactly what he is planning on plugging these headphones into.

Edit: I see the point you are both trying to make regarding this particular use of headphones.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
Last edited by Vulcan at Dec 28, 2013,
#11
Quote by Vulcan
Uh oh. I think the OP better clarify exactly what he is planning on plugging these headphones into.

Edit: I see the point you are both trying to make regarding this particular use of headphones.


Yamaha THR10X
Someone is wrong on the internet. Only you can help.

Originally Posted by Tulkas
Stairway is required on any list of anything involving the words guitar or song, I believe Congress amended the constitution in order to put it into federal law.
#12
Quote by KerNeL_KLuTcH
Yamaha THR10X

Ah, pretty much anything you find comfortable and priced within your budget will work fine. I've tried both my AKG K271 and my Beyer DT770 headphones on one of those. The sound was quite acceptable.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#13
Sennheiser HD 280s are nice and affordable. But I tend to use $15 Sony headphones for guitar because they don’t have enough range to reproduce high-gain hiss.