#1
So normally my rhythm tone is alright, but on this newest recording I'm working on it's really fast (16th notes at 200bpm) and it's just sounding super muddy to the point of not even being able to make out the pitches. Anybody got some suggestions on how to clean it up for fast, muted picking?


https://soundcloud.com/stuarthetzler/folk-metal-song-demo
Check out my band Disturbed
#2
Kick is too loud. Unnecessarily so, to the point it's drowning out everything else. At this point one couldn't tell you if your guitars are muddy or not between that and how low in the mix they are.

As far as fast picking goes, it helps to avoid picking chords and instead, just pick a single note on the one string (which I assume you're doing already). I could discern the notes/note changes themselves, but as mentioned it's impractical to think you can hear anything well enough apart from that kick to make any reasonable judgement.

Guitar tone sound a bit airy, not quite focused in my ears

If you're finding that along with your picking and palm muting it is still getting a bit too muddy, consider automating a dip in the lo-mids or hi-pass further on the rhythm guitars during such passages, or deploy the multiband to tuck in those lows. Double kick runs shouldn't be making up the bulk of your low-end anyways, much less overwhelming every other piece in the mix so consider adjusting the levels during these runs or automating your compression parameters (usually the release setting so that it won't let go on its squeeze quite as soon).
Last edited by Night at Dec 28, 2013,
#3
why dont you just post the guitar tracks
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#4
Making a clearer tone is really easy. The fist things are putting your Gain and Bass a little bit down. Depending on your guitar-amp setting pumping the mids UP is also a good idea. If you are using an overdrive you might try putting the tone knob more to the bright area (as most players use the tone done to get a darker sustain) or you might find it OK to turn it down. Finally, a good compressor might help. When you are playing fast some piano-like compression helps to avoid the notes jumping from in front of the others.

I hope it helps
#5
Quote by Night
Kick is too loud. Unnecessarily so, to the point it's drowning out everything else. At this point one couldn't tell you if your guitars are muddy or not between that and how low in the mix they are.

As far as fast picking goes, it helps to avoid picking chords and instead, just pick a single note on the one string (which I assume you're doing already). I could discern the notes/note changes themselves, but as mentioned it's impractical to think you can hear anything well enough apart from that kick to make any reasonable judgement.

Guitar tone sound a bit airy, not quite focused in my ears

If you're finding that along with your picking and palm muting it is still getting a bit too muddy, consider automating a dip in the lo-mids or hi-pass further on the rhythm guitars during such passages, or deploy the multiband to tuck in those lows. Double kick runs shouldn't be making up the bulk of your low-end anyways, much less overwhelming every other piece in the mix so consider adjusting the levels during these runs or automating your compression parameters (usually the release setting so that it won't let go on its squeeze quite as soon).



Yeah I just threw all the drums together without mixing it just to get an idea of what it'll sound like. I'll try out what you suggested and see if that helps.
Check out my band Disturbed
#6
Stewie,
Don't know if I've ever heard folk metal......OK, yes I have now that I hear this. I like the folk intro. Not wild about the blast beat (?) drums with this. I like the flute & acoustic guitar & lead guitar. Seemed too short the first time I heard it, but made more sense to me the second time. Perhaps you could review my music at this link:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1627184