#1
Ok, let's get something out of the way.

This is a hypothetical situation were I had a clear vision of what I wanted, but I know there'll be someone that calls me a prick.
______________________________________


I've seen a few band interviews, and all the band members sound like they all want the same thing, all have similar opinions on fundamental things (like image, etc... This doesn't mean they agree on everything), and regarding songwriting, they know what they want and agree on a final product. (A great example is this Rammstein interview)

The big question is, how does that work?

Imagine I wanted to start a band, and I knew what I wanted it to be. I don't want it to be me and a few hired musicians, I want a band. How would I find people that have all those qualities for my band?
I'm sure there are a lot of people out there looking for a band, but they have their own ideology and whatnot.
#2
Trial and error i would say. Get members, see what they are like. Are they not what you want? Replace them. Do a sort of an interview before you play with them. Be very specific in your adds. But its probably just shooting in the dark until you find people you want. There's no quick way.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#4
who writes the music?

if you do, find band members that are content to play what you write them.

if not, find someone that writes what you like to play and play what they tell you.

OR find people who all agree on the same style and write their own parts.


all three ways are shots in the dark, and none are ever going to turn out exactly as planned. also, you probably won't get the right line up on your first try. rock n' roll's a stone cold bitch my friend.
#6
It's a great question and you shouldn't rule out luck, what would have happened if Lennon hadn't met McCartney or Jagger had met Richards after their tastes had moved on from the blues?

Having said that the harder you work the luckier you get as Thomas Jefferson is supposed to have said.

You are very lucky for this to happen early in your career as a musician. My advice is to seize every opportunity to play with other people you can and to talk to every musician you meet. That bass player in the soul band might just be dying to play death metal or electro swing and if you don't talk you'll never know. Playing with other people means you meet their friends and increases the chance of meeting a fellow traveller.

The next thing is not to be too picky, there's a lot of young metal fans here who seem to only want to play some obscure genre of metal. there's nothing wrong with metal and if you love it then it is all good but resign yourself to a very low probability of meeting a drummer, bassist guitarist and singer who all share your tastes exactly and are all free at the same time. Stick to your genre and you'll probably stick to playing in your bedroom. Genre is your enemy as a musician in my opinion, however good it is for music fans. I don't really believe only one type of music has the goods and the rest are worthless. If you are really interested in music you'll want to have a try at a lot of styles. Those guys who appear to be in perfect accord are probably just sharing something for a while and are ego free enough to enjoy the moments together. When they all feel they have arrived at their destination some will move on to other things they can't do with this band. Sometimes frustrating for fans but just human nature.

Then there is the problem of meeting up with fellow travellers. Obviously the internet is great for tracking down really specific musical needs but I think there is nothing like meeting people. You are going to want to like the people you work with, they need to live within easy commuting distance of you and there are an awful lot of dreamers advertising their overblown skills on the 'find a bandmate' sites.

The specifics of meeting other musicians are different in different countries but generally go to the places musicians go, be open minded and talk to people. Guitar shops and music shops are great places to hang out but the best thing is to go to places live music is played, not the ig gigs with established artists but the little local places. They are full of musicians checking each other out, I've rarely played a gig without some musician talking to me in the breaks between sets and I certainly talk to them. It's great to share an interest with someone who is actually doing it, there aren't many of us who don't like it when someone is genuinely interested in what we do either.

Good luck with meeting people, make 2014 a good year!
#7
Once you start playing with musicians you meet more musicians. Be respectful and don´t treat people like trading cards but be open and honest, sooner or later you will find yourself in a group of people that share the same interests as you and want to play the same music as you....but in the beginning don´t Think your first band will be that of your Dreams and you´ll get to play only what you want too. Most bands are usually built around a strong core, 2 or 3 individuals that work well together, and are the driving force for the band whilst the rest are just as important it is them that set the pace of the band. Try to find your musical "soulmate", someone that you are creative with, and that shares the same taste in which you want your band to have.... and then start building up around that and see where it grows.

If you are the main "writer" than it´s usually easier too get a band going in the direction you´d like it too but remember to let others have input too...that´s what makes it a band. When it comes to image and hype...that should alway´s come second to that of the Music. Image is for Idol and record companies ;-)
I believe in god, jesus and the holy ghost.....or as i call them Angus, Kirk and Lemmy
#9
Good advice here. The one thing I'll add is that you need to carry yourself like the person you are looking for too. If you come across as an arrogant pr!ck, the musicians you *really* want to play with are not going to want to play with you. Be the person those people want to play with. "Be the change you want to see in the world." haha

Also, establish credibility. If you can establish leadership through a unanimous agreement that you have what it takes to lead, then others will defer to you. They will also know that, if they really do disagree, that you'll listen to them and be willing to compromise, or even change your position yourself, etc.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
A band is not a democracy. It is a team that builds consensus.

Of course, if you are a visionary and can convince others that you are the business, then you can be a megalomaniac freak, and if you find just the right people who recognize this, they will just defer to either your genius or your aggressive temperament.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#11
Quote by axemanchris
A band is not a democracy. It is a team that builds consensus.

CT



I can do nothing but agree with this statement.....I usually refer to it as a "democratic-heirarki". I´ve built my band like it was the kitchen of a 5 star restaurant...each musician is "chef de partie", my lead guitarist is the "sous-chef" and the bandleader is the "chef de cuisine". Each section head is vital for service and the well being of the restaurant and they all must cooperate so that the guest (audience) gets the greatest experience. The head chef in his turn must make the correct decisions when planning the menu (setlist) or he´ll loose his guests and then his chefs and if he is a tyrann they will all go pirate on his ass!! His "sous" helps with decisions and has his foot in both worlds making sure decisions are fair and acting as a ballplank from both ends.

It may sound screwey but I´ve seen band where everybody decides, or nobody does rather said and you can see how it all just goes to the shitters cause no ones steering the boat!!
I believe in god, jesus and the holy ghost.....or as i call them Angus, Kirk and Lemmy
#12
Another way to look at this is a business... If it's "Your" band, and you know what you want, you take on the role of CEO. It'll be your vision, your music choices and your way or the highway. If this is the road you want to take, it needs to be communicated immediately, so there is no discussion to the contrary. If they aren't comfortable taking direction, and can't play things the way you want them to, then they don't get the gig. Communicating this in your ad will help to "weed out" the ego's up front. Musicians will be applying for a Job in a business. If friendships develop from it, all the better, but the business and job comes first.

I've been part of a band like that. Some might say that it makes the music cold, or too business like, but I found that it was more like channeled, directed artistry, and was one of the best jobs I ever had playing music. I didn't have to think, I just had to learn the part as it was written, and play it that way. The band leader took suggestions on occasion during the writing/learning phase, if it fit his vision, but also took action if you didn't play it the way the final version was written.

Keep in mind though that as the leader of "Your" band, you take on some pretty serious responsibilities. Every decision is yours to make. Success or failure is on your shoulders. Equipment such as PA, Lights, stage props, etc... is your responsibility. You can't expect to have total control if the guitar player you have the capability of firing brought his PA system with him. You won't fire him, no matter how bad he follows direction because he'll take the PA with him...

More food for thought...

as always. JMHO
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#13
^ +1

Ct
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
Yupp to the above...myself and my lead guitarist own everything but the instruments....weve been though several line-up changes but nothing that has really affected the band...except having to learn old material again:-(
I believe in god, jesus and the holy ghost.....or as i call them Angus, Kirk and Lemmy
#15
It sounds like your thread title should be reversed. You want "band buddies" as you put it. The difference between hired guns backing you and having a real band, is that you are generally all friends (a lot of these friendships deteriorate, but few groups start out personally hating each other) and all want to contribute to the betterment of the band. If you have no other relationship other than Saturday morning you place a call onto their voicemail that there is band practice today at 2, and that is the only contact you have with them the whole week, he's a hired gun. If you don't have friends who fit this bill, you'll have to make some. You have to develop relationships with your band mates to the point where they see the band on the level you do.