#1
Where should a persons guitar playing skills be after a year? I don't really have any high expectations because like most people say playing for a year is nothing. So my question to, you guys is where do you think one should be after a year?

I have all the basic chords down including Sus chords, and major, minor, slash chords. Not to mention that I've got the F barre chord down I can play a lot of songs involving those chords. I'm currently working on basic finger picking, and blues rhythm guitar.. I really don't want to move onto lead i'm trying to build a really solid foundation in rhythm. From what I've noticed is that people that just play mainly lead, and don't work on rhythm are really limited with their skills..


I'm definitely not trying to be that type of person. So do you think the level that i'm currently at is good for a year of playing? I mean I try as hard as I can to practice every single day.. My strumming technique is definitely not the best, but I'll be working on that once I've got the 12 bar blues, and basics on finger picking down from the, Justin Sandcore's guitar course. I'm on stage 9 it's the last stage of the beginners course.. After completing the course I plan to learn a whole lot of songs from the beginners course to get my rhythm chops up.


I understand the basics of timings quarter notes, 8th notes, triplets, and sixteenth notes and how to work strumming patterns around these different timings. I've got my minor penatonic scale up to 135 BMP. And my ears have grown a lot from transcribing plenty of songs I can pretty much just pick out a solo out of any song if given the time. So am I doing well? I currently reached my 1st year playing anniversary 9 days ago Oh, and by the way i'm 18 year old at the moment . I need all of your opinions and criticism is welcomed.
Last edited by Black_devils at Dec 31, 2013,
#2
between the fact that there's no way to gauge all of this on an objective scale and the fact that there are a million variables involved in this, there's quite literally no way to answer this question

any answer is irrelevant anyway. where you "need to be" is the point at which you can play whatever you want to, so for now just keep improving at whatever enables you to get to a point at which you're satisfied with your own playing and then build from there since you'll never be fully satisfied

i'm right and anyone who says anything else is wrong
#3
Quote by :-D
between the fact that there's no way to gauge all of this on an objective scale and the fact that there are a million variables involved in this, there's quite literally no way to answer this question

any answer is irrelevant anyway. where you "need to be" is the point at which you can play whatever you want to, so for now just keep improving at whatever enables you to get to a point at which you're satisfied with your own playing and then build from there since you'll never be fully satisfied

i'm right and anyone who says anything else is wrong


I totally agree with you, but I just wanted to know if I was just doing well or bad.. It's true that I'll never be satisfied with my playing no matter how good I get because there's always that need for constant improvement. I couldn't do what I could now do 6 months ago.
#4
I mean listing all the stuff you claim to be able to play doesn't really help us judge. You can post a video of yourself playing and we could tell you if it's impressive considering the time span you've been playing.. but even then what's the point, just play to have fun

I think it takes atleast 3-4 years to get to where you can play with enough confidence, that you're really enjoyable to listen to. Once you hit that point, you know. You can learn as much as possible in a year, there's still going to be areas you're lacking.
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Dec 31, 2013,
#5
Quote by Black devils
I mean I try as hard as I can to practice every single day

keep at it man, you're doing great. You enjoying it? (the answer to that should answer your question).
Si
#6
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
I mean listing all the stuff you claim to be able to play doesn't really help us judge. You can post a video of yourself playing and we could tell you if it's impressive considering the time span you've been playing.. but even then what's the point, just play to have fun

I think it takes atleast 3-4 years to get to where you can play with enough confidence, that you're really enjoyable to listen to. Once you hit that point, you know. You can learn as much as possible in a year, there's still going to be areas you're lacking.

I'll be looking towards that 3 or 4 year mark as you've suggested. I used to record myself, but I stopped I don't know what for. Recording my self is a good idea I'll try doing that tomorrow so I can keep track of the progress i'm making.

I can't lie sometimes I don't feel as if i'm making progress, but I know for a fact that I am because I couldn't do a certain thing before.. That's why I'll try to record my self starting tomorrow so I can look back at the recordings, and keep track of my self.. Also catching all the mistakes I've made a little things I need to work on. If I ever have time I'll make a youtube account and record my self on there and post little videos on here.

Oh by the way I am enjoying my self with my guitar playing I'm just really looking forward to playing advances pieces is all, but for now I guess i'm just going to have to stick with the beginner pieces now since you know i'm just a beginner lol...
#7
Quote by 20Tigers
keep at it man, you're doing great. You enjoying it? (the answer to that should answer your question).

Of course I enjoy it lol if I didn't i'm pretty sure I wouldn't have made it a year in. I've heard a lot of stories about people quitting within the 3-6 month mark just because being a beginner is hard as hell. I've struggled to get to the point where i'm at playing 2 hours a day working on specific exercises to build chops, and my timing.

Working on songs to add to my repertoire I'm definitely not as great as I'd like to be my strumming really needs to be worked on since I've made the transition to electric, to acoustic guitar. The acoustic is a whole different beast, but I like it.

I've learned and have gotten my strumming to a desirable point on my electric I can play the songs perfectly to a metronome on my electric. But I can't on the acoustic yet. I guess it will all just come together with practice.. I'm happy with my playing, and I feel as if I have great potential because of my ears they're my strongest point. Sorry if this reply was too long I'm just trying to keep everyone well informed on my progress.
Last edited by Black_devils at Dec 31, 2013,
#8
Well, then there is no need to ask, judging from your replies. Just carry on doing what you do and never give a shit what others think regarding your progress. To ask a question such as "How good am I" (in all its various forms), you will need a very thick hide for responses as there will be many people who would love to break you into pieces... merely because its something they enjoy.

I understand its an ego thing as well as a need for reassurances... everyone requires a hand hold now and then so its ok. A forum, however, is not the place for it. Seek out someone who has been playing a while and let them guide you in person. Just remember, don't accept sweets from strangers...
#9
Quote by 20Tigers
You enjoying it? (the answer to that should answer your question).
I disagree. It is okay to work hard and play while inching the metronome from 100 to 101 to 102 and so on. That isn't fun. It totally sucks! You're a better guitarist for having put in that hard work, though.

(It's also fine to just play for fun.)

The fact that you believe that you're working hard is critical. You're old enough to be able to be honest with yourself about when you're being lazy. If you're working hard, there's not a lot else that you can demand of yourself. I don't know the course you're using, but following guidance from a respected teacher whose name I recognize is going to put you in a position to practice efficiently so that when you practice for an hour, you don't get out of it what I accomplish in ten minutes.

Overall, it sounds like you're at a pretty good position. Some people figure out how to sweep diminished arpeggios within their first 18 months of playing, but very few of us can practice 27 hours every day. (Yes, I know that I said 27. It's a joke.) I'm very curious about your "135bpm" comment. What does that mean. Are you playing through the pentatonic scale by alternate picking 16th notes? It won't be long before you'll want to do that at 165/185/200, but 16th notes at 135 is hardly trivial. Even if it's just 8th notes, it's absolutely critical for you to get comfortable with alternate picking, so go as slow as necessary while you're learning. Play it right before you play it fast. If you're truly able to hit 16th notes at 135 within your first year and nine days, that's a pretty solid first year you've had.

Quote by Black_devils
It's true that I'll never be satisfied with my playing no matter how good I get because there's always that need for constant improvement.
It is wise to keep this attitude away from high school girls, but I love this.
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I disagree. It is okay to work hard and play while inching the metronome from 100 to 101 to 102 and so on. That isn't fun. It totally sucks! You're a better guitarist for having put in that hard work, though.

(It's also fine to just play for fun.)

The fact that you believe that you're working hard is critical. You're old enough to be able to be honest with yourself about when you're being lazy. If you're working hard, there's not a lot else that you can demand of yourself.

That second paragraph was what I was intending. Hence why I singled out his quote in regard to that he is practicing daily.

Though I don't see how your first paragraph is not compatible with what I asked.

When I go to the gym and am pushing myself well outside my comfort zone it is not fun at all. It is really hard work and my body is crying out to stop, and that feeling also totally sucks. -But just because I'm not having fun doesn't mean I'm not enjoying it. Hard work can be enjoyable even when it is not fun.

I love playing the guitar even when it is not fun.
Si
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I disagree. It is okay to work hard and play while inching the metronome from 100 to 101 to 102 and so on. That isn't fun. It totally sucks! You're a better guitarist for having put in that hard work, though.

(It's also fine to just play for fun.)

The fact that you believe that you're working hard is critical. You're old enough to be able to be honest with yourself about when you're being lazy. If you're working hard, there's not a lot else that you can demand of yourself. I don't know the course you're using, but following guidance from a respected teacher whose name I recognize is going to put you in a position to practice efficiently so that when you practice for an hour, you don't get out of it what I accomplish in ten minutes.

Overall, it sounds like you're at a pretty good position. Some people figure out how to sweep diminished arpeggios within their first 18 months of playing, but very few of us can practice 27 hours every day. (Yes, I know that I said 27. It's a joke.) I'm very curious about your "135bpm" comment. What does that mean. Are you playing through the pentatonic scale by alternate picking 16th notes? It won't be long before you'll want to do that at 165/185/200, but 16th notes at 135 is hardly trivial. Even if it's just 8th notes, it's absolutely critical for you to get comfortable with alternate picking, so go as slow as necessary while you're learning. Play it right before you play it fast. If you're truly able to hit 16th notes at 135 within your first year and nine days, that's a pretty solid first year you've had.

It is wise to keep this attitude away from high school girls, but I love this.



Uh no dude I'm playing at 135 Bmp playing quarter notes lol.. I'm not ready for 8th notes. I plan to get it to 160Bmp then drop it to. 80 bmp playing 8th notes, and so on.. I always practice something slowly, and accurately then when i'm comfortable enough with it I move it up 5 Bpm and so on the process continues.
Last edited by Black_devils at Dec 31, 2013,
#12
How many songs can you play from start to finish, at tempo?

Learn songs.
#13
Quote by Virgman
How many songs can you play from start to finish, at tempo?

Learn songs.


Yes I'd be more focussed on learning full songs and getting that strumming patterns than reaching a certain speed doing a certain exercise. The guitar is a musical instrument, not a bench press.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
Learn songs if your into that, but improvising helps develop your own sound better. You have to do a bit of both depending on your goals. I've been playing more than 10 years and hardly know any full songs, mainly because I have no interest in playing other peoples music.
Last edited by Tempoe at Jan 1, 2014,
#15
Quote by Tempoe
Learn songs if your into that, but improvising helps develop your own sound better. You have to do a bit of both depending on your goals. I've been playing more than 10 years and hardly know any full songs, mainly because I have no interest in playing other peoples music.

That's how it has always been with me. I usually only learn other people's music for the sake of analyzing it and kinda copying cool tricks into my playing, etc.

It has been really useful in the beginning of my piano playing, though. I had no clue about piano, but learned a lot of different things from learning other people's songs with and without sheet music. Stuff like arpeggiating chords in a cool way, combining chords and melody........
#16
Sounds like your doing great...just keep at it, mix theory, scales and the practical with Learning to play songs and enjoy yourself!! As long as you can see improvemnet your doing good, just remember to learn your techniques and skills correctly ie holding your pick, alternate picking and so on so it doesn´t bite you in the ass a few years down the road

Now aday´s you can just turn on your Xbox and get the same acomplishment feeling after 15 minutes that it takes 3- 5 years of Learning a skill to get....so pat yourself on the back for sticking with it a year.....that is just an accomplishment in itself in these Days of instant gratification ;-)

...man I sounded old there didn´t I....
I believe in god, jesus and the holy ghost.....or as i call them Angus, Kirk and Lemmy
#17
Quote by Tempoe
Learn songs if your into that, but improvising helps develop your own sound better. You have to do a bit of both depending on your goals. I've been playing more than 10 years and hardly know any full songs, mainly because I have no interest in playing other peoples music.


Interesting but what do you do when someone asks you to "play something"?
#18
Quote by Virgman
How many songs can you play from start to finish, at tempo?

Learn songs.

7 songs with all different strumming patterns.
#19
Quote by AlanHB
Yes I'd be more focussed on learning full songs and getting that strumming patterns than reaching a certain speed doing a certain exercise. The guitar is a musical instrument, not a bench press.



I know 7 songs start from finish, and can play them well. I've pretty much got the 12 bar blues down since I last posted on this. And i'm working on finger style picking while learning a song that includes finger style. I'm almost done with the course so to speak I've learned a lot.


I want to finish it then I can focus all my time onto learning and working on new songs... Right now I'm just working on finger picking this one song. Killing me softly I forgot the Artists name, Also I just use scales as warm ups.. 10 minutes in the morning running them front to back. Most of my practice schedule revolves working on songs any how I just don't practice scales like a mindless maniac I just do it to work my fingers out, and keep them dexterious.
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 1, 2014,
#20
Quote by Blackst4r
Sounds like your doing great...just keep at it, mix theory, scales and the practical with Learning to play songs and enjoy yourself!! As long as you can see improvemnet your doing good, just remember to learn your techniques and skills correctly ie holding your pick, alternate picking and so on so it doesn´t bite you in the ass a few years down the road

Now aday´s you can just turn on your Xbox and get the same acomplishment feeling after 15 minutes that it takes 3- 5 years of Learning a skill to get....so pat yourself on the back for sticking with it a year.....that is just an accomplishment in itself in these Days of instant gratification ;-)

...man I sounded old there didn´t I....



I literally just laughed my ass off reading the post. The things that you've stated are so true where I live no one plays an instrument! I was surprised when I first started playing because I though a lot of people were actually into guitar playing, but I guess that isn't so because I can't find anyone to jam with.. Especially since I started learning my senior year while in high school. From what I've noticed all my years going to high school no one seemed to play or talk about an instrument people were so involved in other things to the point where I was actually surprised. I don't know if I can even join a band just to become a rhythm guitarist or just jam with someone.


There's no musicians near me or anyone I know of that plays down here in, Florida... I've gained a lot from learning how to play the guitar it's implemented self discipline in me, and has taught me that not everything in life comes easily. It really taught me how to persevere because you might not get it the first time so you have to keep trying harder, and harder till you finally succeed.


It's also taught me how to throw instant gratification out the window, and to have patience.. All I can really say is that it's really developed my character as a person. Now a days people quit to easily I've heard many stories of people that would just pick it up play for 3-6 months, and just quit because they couldn't play their favorite songs.. I can also understand why people younger then me tend to quit just because of the fact that it takes so much passion, and self discipline in order to make any progress with a musical instrument. I definitely couldn't have learnt to play the guitar at 13-16 I just didn't have discipline required now that I think about it.
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 1, 2014,
#21
Quote by Tempoe
Learn songs if your into that, but improvising helps develop your own sound better. You have to do a bit of both depending on your goals. I've been playing more than 10 years and hardly know any full songs, mainly because I have no interest in playing other peoples music.


So do you write a lot of songs and perform in original bands?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#22
Quote by Black_devils
7 songs with all different strumming patterns.


That's good.

Basically all you have to do is continue to add songs to your repertoire and perhaps learn more challenging songs. This may seem very simplistic but that is really all you have to do.

As you learn more and more songs your technique will improve also.

When the you feel the time is right to learn soloing for example, you could then learn a solo from one of your songs.
Last edited by Virgman at Jan 2, 2014,
#23
Quote by Virgman
That's good.

Basically all you have to do is continue to add songs to your repertoire and perhaps learn more challenging songs. This may seem very simplistic but that is really all you have to do.

As you learn more and more songs your technique will improve also.

When the you feel the time is right to learn soloing for example, you could then learn a solo from one of your songs.


That's exactly what I do.. I also started recorded my playing to keep track of my progress. thank you for your reply I appreciate it very much!
#24
I think you're smart for getting various rythem chops down.
Heck , pick up a dime store bass while you're at it.
You'll be in a band quick.
Cant have a band without a good rhythm section.lol

example...do you know there's 16 basic acoustic guitar picking/strumming patterns?
That's without alternative tuning.lol
Play different style of music. from funk, folk, jazz, rock, metal to country.


If you want to start soloing...remember those 5 pentatonic patterns that fits together
like a jig saw puzzle like the back of your hand. Its the basic of navigating the fret board.
You have to be able to shift those patterns (as a whole) up and down the neck to play
in various keys. After a while you have to see it as one big pattern as a whole.

It's easier to just fill in the 2 missing notes later on if you wish to play a more
complete scale.

Without racking your brain. Music theory must be easy to comprehend. it is easy....
Memorize the MAJOR DIATONIC SCALE. This is your reference point.

Playing in different keys = playing in different pitch.
Remember there's a double dotted inlay on your fret board.
That's because there's only 12 pitch that you can play various scales.

Chords are just every other note.
Learn to see it like this....1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 13 (reference from the major diatonic.)
This way you can learn wicked off the wall scales faster.
All minor chords have a -3 or flat3

1,3,5 = maj
1,3,5,7 = maj7
1,3,5,9= maj9....ect

1,-3,5 = minor

1, -3, 5, -7 = min7

1,5,9 = Sus9

Sus = remove the 3

diminish = less
augment= add

1, -3,-5 = diminish

Scales for starters
Example EASY

Ionian (diatonic) = 1,2,3,4,5,6,7
Lower the 7 get the mixolian
raise the 4 get the lyian

Drop the 4,7 get the major pentatonic.

Aeolian = 1,2,-3,4,5,-6,-7
From the Aeolian....
Raise the 7 get the harmonic minor.
Raise the 6 get the dorian
Lower the 2 get the Phrygian
Lower the 2,5 get the locrian

Drop the 2 ,6 get minor pentatonic.
#25
If you're still in your first year, let me save you some time later on...

work on the playing by ear thing early - or at the very least, play songs overtop of the recordings, i neglected to do this and it bit me in the a@@. Im nearly year 3 years in, and I could go on for hours about which excersizes have helped in terms of dexterity and speed, and control, and which songs seemed to help with learning different chord changes. But physically playing, is something that most people can quickly develop a plan to accomplish, and easily follow it, becoming a musician, is much more abstract and difficult.

If you play one guitar, and use tablature, you'll never get a feel for "music", and instead, youll really only get good at playing your instrument, which is nice, but sort of useless if you want to try out a new instrument later, or stop using tablature.

Youll probably want to get started on theory a bit too, no need to go overboard. My point is just that theres some things that take a very long time to digest, so its better to give 10 minutes a day to playing songs by ear and theory, than to get really good chops, and try to cram the rest of it later... youll regret it if your goals are short sighted, it might be good to say " by the time im 2 years in id like to play such and such song " as its easily tested, but if you spend all your time working on your chops, youll find that even as technical virtuoso youll need to spend years to catch up musically with other people - and that can be a very disheartening feeling.
#26
Quote by blunderwonder
If you're still in your first year, let me save you some time later on...

work on the playing by ear thing early - or at the very least, play songs overtop of the recordings, i neglected to do this and it bit me in the a@@. Im nearly year 3 years in, and I could go on for hours about which excersizes have helped in terms of dexterity and speed, and control, and which songs seemed to help with learning different chord changes. But physically playing, is something that most people can quickly develop a plan to accomplish, and easily follow it, becoming a musician, is much more abstract and difficult.

If you play one guitar, and use tablature, you'll never get a feel for "music", and instead, youll really only get good at playing your instrument, which is nice, but sort of useless if you want to try out a new instrument later, or stop using tablature.

Youll probably want to get started on theory a bit too, no need to go overboard. My point is just that theres some things that take a very long time to digest, so its better to give 10 minutes a day to playing songs by ear and theory, than to get really good chops, and try to cram the rest of it later... youll regret it if your goals are short sighted, it might be good to say " by the time im 2 years in id like to play such and such song " as its easily tested, but if you spend all your time working on your chops, youll find that even as technical virtuoso youll need to spend years to catch up musically with other people - and that can be a very disheartening feeling.



Ha thanks for the advice, but I already know how to pick songs out by ear. I don't even use tabs If you read my post you'd see that I stated my, ears were my strongest point.. But thanks anyways I wouldn't trust tabs for the life of me I'm always relying on my ears for everything I do. Recently I finished picking the RHCP guitar solo, Californication.


I tabbed it out for when I get into learning lead.. I learned all the licks I know from transcribing blues songs. It's fun to mess around with the licks. And I agree with you on people just getting into the technicalities of music.. And just leaving their ears alone not working them out.. They can play other peoples songs note for note well not necessarily if they learned it by tabs..


But my point is that they're pretty much able to play another persons song, but when it comes around to composing their own songs it just sounds bland and boring. Not to mention that it just sounds like they're running around in scales.. I transcribe 30 minutes to 1 hour a day it all depends on how I feel that day. Or if ears have burnt out that day, and I can't figure out the rest of the song. I'll just rest and come back the next day figuring it out.

Once you start learning the wonderful benefits of being able to transcribe songs you'll see that there's literally millions of different ways a song could be played. It doesn't always have to be played note for note doing that would just get boring after a while.. Plus learning how to recompose another artists song teaches you how to compose. There's just way too much benefits for me to write in this post about learning songs by ear I could go on for days about how beneficial it is.
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 2, 2014,
#27
Quote by smc818
I think you're smart for getting various rythem chops down.
Heck , pick up a dime store bass while you're at it.
You'll be in a band quick.
Cant have a band without a good rhythm section.lol

example...do you know there's 16 basic acoustic guitar picking/strumming patterns?
That's without alternative tuning.lol
Play different style of music. from funk, folk, jazz, rock, metal to country.


If you want to start soloing...remember those 5 pentatonic patterns that fits together
like a jig saw puzzle like the back of your hand. Its the basic of navigating the fret board.
You have to be able to shift those patterns (as a whole) up and down the neck to play
in various keys. After a while you have to see it as one big pattern as a whole.

It's easier to just fill in the 2 missing notes later on if you wish to play a more
complete scale.

Without racking your brain. Music theory must be easy to comprehend. it is easy....
Memorize the MAJOR DIATONIC SCALE. This is your reference point.

Playing in different keys = playing in different pitch.
Remember there's a double dotted inlay on your fret board.
That's because there's only 12 pitch that you can play various scales.

Chords are just every other note.
Learn to see it like this....1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 13 (reference from the major diatonic.)
This way you can learn wicked off the wall scales faster.
All minor chords have a -3 or flat3

1,3,5 = maj
1,3,5,7 = maj7
1,3,5,9= maj9....ect

1,-3,5 = minor

1, -3, 5, -7 = min7

1,5,9 = Sus9

Sus = remove the 3

diminish = less
augment= add

1, -3,-5 = diminish

Scales for starters
Example EASY

Ionian (diatonic) = 1,2,3,4,5,6,7
Lower the 7 get the mixolian
raise the 4 get the lyian

Drop the 4,7 get the major pentatonic.

Aeolian = 1,2,-3,4,5,-6,-7
From the Aeolian....
Raise the 7 get the harmonic minor.
Raise the 6 get the dorian
Lower the 2 get the Phrygian
Lower the 2,5 get the locrian

Drop the 2 ,6 get minor pentatonic.



Thanks for the compliment, and music theory is something I'd like to get into. I plan on buying a beginners music theory book from, Justin Sandercoe once I get enough money.
#28
TS, it seems like you enjoy the instrument and truly desire to get good at it. That's good.

As everyone else has said, learn songs. Also, if what you are posting on here is true about your ability, then I think you are ready to take the next steps. Having stayed with it so long, you understand by now that there will come times where rigid focused exercise is required learn certain skills. I shall lay out a general guideline to practice over the next few months, but first, I need you to answer some questions.

1. Do you know all the notes on the guitar neck cold?

2. Do you know how to harmonize a major scale?

3. Do you know understand intervals by their sound and their name?

4. Do you know chords by their sound and name?
#29
Quote by macashmack
TS, it seems like you enjoy the instrument and truly desire to get good at it. That's good.

As everyone else has said, learn songs. Also, if what you are posting on here is true about your ability, then I think you are ready to take the next steps. Having stayed with it so long, you understand by now that there will come times where rigid focused exercise is required learn certain skills. I shall lay out a general guideline to practice over the next few months, but first, I need you to answer some questions.

1. Do you know all the notes on the guitar neck cold?

2. Do you know how to harmonize a major scale?

3. Do you know understand intervals by their sound and their name?

4. Do you know chords by their sound and name?


I know all the open position of the notes, but that's about it. I know all the basic minor, and major chords by name, and sound. The D major, A major, E major, G, C major. The A minor, E minor, and D minor. Oh and the big G chord, and the folk G btw I love the big G I use it more than the regular one .

In addition I know the basic suspended chords, Asus2, Asus4 Dsus2, Dsus4, Esus4. I know the dominant 7th open chords the G7, C7, D7, E7, A7, B7. I know the common slash chords there's only three that I know D/F# G/B C/G. The only barre chord I know is the F barre, and that's about it. I'll learn more when I'm finished with the beginners course for now I just want to get all these strumming patterns I know together. Just working on songs and what not I would love for you to give me some guide lines, or tips if they would greatly benefit me.

I don't know the major scale truth be told I haven't really gotten deep into scales. I know the basic minor pentatonic scale only one pattern which I've been practicing up, and down. The reason why I don't know so much scales is because I was told there was no pointing in learning a whole bunch of them if you don't even know how to utilize them.


I'm getting really good at understanding how the minor pentatonic is used because I transcribe a lot of blues records, and I analyze how they move licks up and down in the position of the scale. I've pretty much learned every lick I know by ear so I guess you could say I have a good understand of that scale even though I only know one pattern.. I don't know intervals, but in which way would they benefit me?

Like I said i'm not really big on music theory, but when I have the cash i'm buying a book on basic theory from, Justin Sandercoe. I have a lot of time on my hands by the way since i'm able to practice for 2 hours a day. I go off to college in, January 7th so I've got plenty of time lol.
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 3, 2014,
#30
Break things down into sections and remember onething at a time.
This way your brain can absorb and retain it.

Remember this for 1 week.
The major or diatonic has 1/2 step between the (3 and 4) and (7 and 8 root)
3478.....like last digits to a phone number.

In the key of C. It's the reference because in the key of C there's no sharp or flat in the key
signature. Basically all the White keys on a piano.
(3=E, 4=F) ( B=7, C=8 or root)

Remember this for one week.
Chords.....
1, 4, 5 or in romans I , IV , V = Maj


Remember this the next week
2,3,6 = Min

7 = min flat 5 ( or diminish)


Next week...
6 = Relative minor.
5 = Dominate. (the dominate will have a flat 7)

The 1 and 4 chord will be Maj7...if you add a 7th note. (Example Cmaj7, Fmaj7)

The 5 or dominate will be 7 (Example, G7)

it's because the 1 and 4 chord has 1/2 step below it.

The dominate or 5......has a full step below it ( between the 4 and 5 )
If you start your count from the Dominate as the root....the 4th note becomes the 7th note.
Therefore it's a FLAT in relation to the diatonic sequence.

So when you see a E7 chord...you pretty know it's the dominate or 5th.
It'll give you reference to the key you're playing in. The key of A

You can also look up the golden ration, flower of life..ect
Music is directly related to it.
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 3, 2014,
#31
Quote by Black_devils

In addition I know the basic suspended chords, Asus2, Asus4 Dsus2, Dsus4, Esus4. I know the dominant 7th open chords the G7, C7, D7, E7, A7, B7. I know the common slash chords there's only three that I know D/F# G/B C/G...............

To me it sounds like you know the chords by shape rather than how they're constructed from scales.

If I were you I would learn major and minor scales and how chords are constructed from them(minor, major, dominant, half diminished). Also memorize the basic barre chord shapes. It's really easy, because you only have to learn one shape that you can slide around the neck.

Pay attention to the notes in the chord and which one is which scale degree. That way you know that if you for example want to play a dominant #5 chord, you know which note to sharpen (raise by half a step). In this case it's the fifth of the chord. Chords and scales are the same thing. Chords are basically just many notes of the scale played at the same time.

Only knowing the chords by shape is really clumsy, because if you for example want to play a Dm11 chord or something and you only know the D minor chord shape, you can't easily add those extensions. However, if you know the scales, you know can easily modify your chords and add extensions to them. Also if you can't reach all the notes (I love piano because you never have this problem) and need to drop some from the voicing, you know which ones are the less important ones.

Obviously, to apply this stuff properly, memorization of the notes on the fretboard is required.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Jan 3, 2014,
#33
Guys like I've said I haven't really gotten into music theory yet lol.. So yeah you can lay me a guide down, but don't make it too hard just the basics please.
#34
I am going to say some stuff that I mean in all seriousness.

1) You have learned a lot and you are going at it with all the ferocity of youth. I spent the bulk of my junior and senior year of high school locked in my room working on my ear. I had already learned to read a little music (I knew the treble cleff, bass cleff and the rhythmic markings) but I really worked the ear. When you say you "already know how to work out songs by ear" I believe you do. So could I. But, I also know now that I didn't really know that much about it because what I was listening to and working out by ear was a lot of the same crap over and over with different bands and different guitarists...but the same stuff.

2) The theory I tried to ignore from my piano teacher became my biggest asset in learning the guitar. You need to dive into theory ASAP. Don't let it intimidate you. Theory isn't a series of rules....it is a way to analyze and talk about the music you are listening to or playing.

3) Recognize that no matter how many chords you know, you have still only scratched the surface of what is possible on the guitar (or bigger picture...only scratched the surface of what is possible in music in general).

4) There is tremendous value in working through a guitar method. I hated my first guitar teacher. Hated him, hated Mel Bay and eventually hated my guitar because of him and Mel Bay. But, one day I was asked to play in a Jazz Band type of ensemble. I agreed and they handed me a guitar arrangement. In standard notation....UGHGGHG. But, I calmed down (as it was a few days before the first practice) and looked at it and guess what? I could read it. Oh, certainly not at first sight....but whatever that douche had taught me stuck. Then, as an adult, I went out and purchased the entire 7 book expanded edition series of the Mel Bay Modern Guitar Method. I have gained valuable insight into the instrment by reading through this series and I am only on the 3rd volume. I highly recommend doing it. Use Mel Bay, Berklee Method, Alfred, or whatever you can get your hands on. Being able to read notation will separate you from the pack.

5) This one is a tough one to recommend. Partly because I know for a fact that I would never have agreed to to this when I was a teenager because of how girly (or whatever other small minded teenage 1990 frame of reference cliche you can hang on it) it would have made me feel at the time. But now, as a mature adult without any fears of what others might think of it learning to sight sing with solfege syllables. It is a crucial step in developing into a complete musician.
#36
Quote by macashmack
How is solfege girly?

LOL. It isn't. I was referring to the way my 16/17 year old brain saw it way back in 1989/90. I couldn't hsve envisioned myself singing out notes that way. I kept Saturday morning piano lessons a secret from the rest of the football team. I threw out that caveat to say that for him (the OP) I realize he may not be personally ready for that step her being a teenage boy. I had to wait until I was mature enough not to have any lingering attitudes like that to do it. Maybe times have changed enough that he will do it if he wants to. I just know how teenage boys think. I am a high school teacher and coach now. Deal with them every day.
#37
Why do so many people thing that guitar is a game? "i have to be able to play this before 6 months or i lose"????? there is no to answer to this, you should be where you are because we're all different, theres people that have been playing for 10 years that you'd be better than and some who've been playing 3 months and are better than you, i've been playing for 14 months and i don't care about "where i should be by now" if you're not comfortable with where you are then do something about it, if you are happy then just keep having fun with it

Rant over haha
"Music Without Emotion Is Like Food Without Flavour"
Paul Gilbert