#1
Hi people,
When I was a teenager many moons ago, I knew that guitar is not an easy instrument to play with but I tried to put effort into it. I was struggling with classical guitar but I didn’t put it inside the closet when I went into difficulties. I kept on learning it to the point I was able to perform at the end of senior year.
My teenage cousin is currently learning guitar and she loved it in the beginning. Unfortunately, she is currently struggling with finger position and reading notes plus tabs. She said to me that she now wants to quit playing guitar even though she has just been learning it for 4 months. With so many learning materials out there, why teenagers nowadays give up guitar easily? do you guys think because it is too easy to do music sampling instead of playing instrument? I want to hear from teenagers/young adults or anybody who have them. If there any guitar courses, apps, or gears that can sustain interest, please advise. Thanks
#2
I guess that in order to become great at guitar (or any instrument) you need to have a real passion for it. You really need to love music and be interested in it. It's also important to understand that practicing is sometimes going to be annoying and difficult, but you will be rewarded later if you're persistent.

During these 6 years of learning music/instruments, the thought of quitting has never crossed my mind. Sure, I have had phases where I kind of just forgot about it for a while, but I never even considered quitting.

If she really wants to quit, maybe playing guitar just isn't her thing after all.
#3
Learning a new skill is hard. Most people give up after 3-4 months.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#4
Teenagers, especially still in high school, usually have a whole lot of "very important" things to worry about. Anything that requires real effort can turn into a chore real quick... some will stick with it, some wont.
#5
I say screw the music notation until she's settled down and doesn't have to worry about so many things. For many beginners there's no real need to learn to read the music notation.

Get her to learn songs she likes to keep her motivated. When she comes across chords that she hasn't learned before, that's a good time to learn it. Otherwise, it's all just going to be memorizing the fingerings for the chords without actually seeing them in use.

Most importantly, do you know the reason why she wants to quit? Is it boring? Is she not seeing results even with practice? Are her fingers still hurting because her calluses haven't developed fully?
#6
I'm 18 and have been playing for about 14 months, i think the problem is that you can't just wake up and think maybe i'll try guitar, you have to really want it to stick with it and i don't think the fact that we have better resources is a reason to start playing or to not give up, 40 years ago people didn't realize all the resources because they didn't exist so the mindset is the same now as it was then, it's gets easier but if she realy wants to quit then guitar isn't her thing
"Music Without Emotion Is Like Food Without Flavour"
Paul Gilbert
#7
It's typical. The first year is hard becuase you dont have hand strenght. I could barely make
the full Fmaj bar chord clean. Back when...I difinately didnt have books to give me
at least pentatonic scale on the fretboard.
My father just bought me a cheap $10 SilverTone from a yard sale and a crappy amp.
Thats because he didnt know I was going to stick with it or not. It had crappy actions.
Shear fustrations. Luckily I had music since 2nd grade. I knew what the major scale was.
I knew I had to learn all the natrual notes on the fretboard.

I was determind. I learned all the open chords. Whether i understood them or not.
I learned the fretboard note for note. Whether I counted them out or drew them on
a piece of paper.
Nobody was going to teach me any songs I liked. I had to figure all that shit out by ear.
Most of my cassette tapes were warp and worn out.

Seeing that i was still with it. He never had to ask me to practice.
As a matter of fact sometimes I'd get grounded from my guitar becuase i played it so damn
much. I'd write the notes on the fretboard on paper without the freaken guitar.
I was determind.lmao
Seeing that I was still with it, my father purchased me a LesPual. He even went out of his way to build me a homemade tube screamer.
I was only 10...my hand was barely big enough to play the damn thing.
Plus my father was the dean of ou church. My parented though they had a child from
hell playing Highway to hell and Ozzy. F-it..i went and got The number of the Beast
and played 666 forward.
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 16, 2014,
#8
Everyone has trouble at some point with the guitar whether your a teenager or not. I cannot play barre chords worth shit but I still practice them everyday. If the guitar were easy everyone would do it. It takes work but that's the fun part. Seeing how you progress is very rewarding. You think Jimi Hendrix could play the second he grabbed a guitar?NOPE!!! Point is to stick with it no matter what. PRACTICE,PRACTICE,PRACTICE!!!!
#9
I saw this thread just now. I can understand where your cousin is coming from learning the guitar is no easy task. I'm a year into my playing, and it's not easy as anyone would expect it to be i'm still struggling with certain things in my playing. Right now i'm working on some strumming patterns and songs that include barre chord in them. It's definitely not a thing that happens over night I still remember struggling with my first chord fingering that A major chord (The first chord I ever learned) Was a serious hassle.

She's still in High School, and I know for a fact the high school I went to (Graduated in 2013, and i'm 18) Gave a ton of homework not to mention the projects. I don't know if her schools like that, but if it is then I could totally relate she might not have enough time to practice on the guitar.. Learning it is a serious commitment especially if you want to be great at it. Maybe she'll come around during the summer who knows..
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 16, 2014,
#10
Couldn't she just learn a few songs that are fun to play. This is the whole point: it's got to be fun, not a chore.
#11
I've never ever wanted to quit playing guitar even when I get frustrated with it. It's like anything anyone does. I found THE best thing to do is get with guys who are passionate about it and jam with them. It's a great way to lift your spirits and it really gets exciting.
My suggestion would be just get together with her and just jam with her.
#12
Because teenagers nowadays have so much distractions, they don't believe learning a new skill is worth it when they can just play videogames.
#14
I am 54 and just starting to learn. It doesn't really matter what age you are the difficulties in learning guitar vary from person to person and sometimes where we are in life makes the difference. I would say she's overwhelming herself with too much at once. I was doing the same thing but I went and purchased Justinguitar's beginners bundle to learn step by step. Although I've just started I've noticed that my stress level has dropped and I'm actually enjoying learning guitar. I also do know that learning guitar will be difficult at different times as things don't always come easy. I also meant to mention that this forum has a list of places beginners can go to get help along with the one I mentioned. She should join this forum and she will learn all she needs to or at least get some answers during learning blocks.
Last edited by Vblue at Jan 25, 2014,
#15
Quote by guitargarden
With so many learning materials out there, why teenagers nowadays give up guitar easily? do you guys think because it is too easy to do music sampling instead of playing instrument?


While, yes, there is a large amount of material about the instrument, that does not change the fact that one must have the drive to practice the physical aspects of the instrument. I've been playing 6 years since I was 13 and I didn't find any "distractions" because I wanted to become a musician.

What's "music sampling"?
#16
I don't really believe that teenagers can't learn an instrument because i'm a teenager, and I practice 2-3 hours a day.. It's just the people that really love the instrument make significant progress with it.
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 25, 2014,
#17
Quote by Vblue
I am 54 and just starting to learn. It doesn't really matter what age you are the difficulties in learning guitar vary from person to person and sometimes where we are in life makes the difference. I would say she's overwhelming herself with too much at once. I was doing the same thing but I went and purchased Justinguitar's beginners bundle to learn step by step. Although I've just started I've noticed that my stress level has dropped and I'm actually enjoying learning guitar. I also do know that learning guitar will be difficult at different times as things don't always come easy. I also meant to mention that this forum has a list of places beginners can go to get help along with the one I mentioned. She should join this forum and she will learn all she needs to or at least get some answers during learning blocks.



Exactly it doesn't matter how old you are when you pick the guitar up. The only thing that really matters is how much hours you put into it, and that's efficient hours of practiceThere's plenty of people who have been playing for years on, and off they haven't made any significant progress because they haven't put in the hours. Also I'd suggest that you make an account on the forum it's very useful I have an account on his website.
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 25, 2014,
#18
All of you may be right, maybe she just doesn't want it that bad.
#19
Basically, once the going got tough, she wants to throw in the towel.

Don't give this lazy excuse of a guitarist any time. Never in my years of playing have I ever wanted to quit just because something was hard. Reading these comments, neither did anyone else. It's because we actually enjoyed it, and knew that if we couldn't do something, that just meant that when we could we'd be that much better. We are driven. Your cousin clearly is not.

Let her give up. It's not something that you can force, it has to come from within, and if she doesn't have it, she never will.
#20
Quote by smc818
[things]

I actually... sort of... understood that! Good job! #condescendingarsehole

Anyway, yeah just let her give up for now. She might get a bit more interested again later. If anyone forces her she might end up hating it. By the way, is she getting lessons or learning by herself?

Also, wow, I hadn't seen liampje around in a couple of years!
Last edited by sickman411 at Jan 25, 2014,
#21
What's important to keep interest is to enjoy it. She's gotta play music she likes! And not be overwhelmed with the "boring" stuff right away, there's plenty of time to read sheet music, learn scales and memorize fretboards later.

Make sure she's learning music she likes, which probably isn't Mary had a little lamb nor Smoke on the water or any guitar classics a veteran teacher might suggest. She would probably love to play Beyonce or Demi Lovato or whatever's cool with teenagers nowadays. Anything can be arranged even if it's not really guitar music. Make sure she's having fun with the playing because girls just wanna have fun is usually spot on. There are probably more people who quit the instrument than not though
#22
@ fanapathy, that's what I was trying to say. Maybe she's overwhelming herself with theory when right now she should be learning what she likes. I don't believe in giving up on someone just because they're feeling discouraged. He's looking for help and direction so she doesn't give up on it. Sometimes a little support for a beginner goes a long way. Some people get defeated easier then others, it doesn't necessarily mean they don't want it as much.
I wish I had an uncle or someone when I was younger who cared as much to come and try and find help for me at that age. Good for you and this forum is the place for her.
#23
Quote by Vblue
@ fanapathy, that's what I was trying to say. Maybe she's overwhelming herself with theory when right now she should be learning what she likes. I don't believe in giving up on someone just because they're feeling discouraged. He's looking for help and direction so she doesn't give up on it. Sometimes a little support for a beginner goes a long way. Some people get defeated easier then others, it doesn't necessarily mean they don't want it as much.
I wish I had an uncle or someone when I was younger who cared as much to come and try and find help for me at that age. Good for you and this forum is the place for her.


+1

Heck I've been playing for about 13 years now (and already read music (badly) before I started playing) and I've never really tried reading music for guitar.

I've also never really found guitar difficult* or a chore- I just enjoy it and have (luckily) found a way which works for me and makes it seem like fun. It's meant to be fun.

If you ask me, if it's a chore but you keep going or whatever it doesn't prove "character" or some nonsense like that, it just proves you're doing it wrong. Maybe all your cousin needs is to figure out a way that makes it seem fun.

Or maybe she just doesn't enjoy it, which is also ok- there may be other things she enjoys doing that I'd find a chore.

* That's not to say I can play everything or anything like that, there are far better players than me who'll make me look like a hack so quickly it's not even funny. What I mean is that I've never even considered giving up, because I've always enjoyed it. If something was too hard, I gave it a shot, and if it was still too hard I moved on to something simpler which I had a fighting chance at "getting". It's a fine line between trying to improve but not trying stuff which is impossible which will discourage you.

EDIT: I should also probably clarify that I just play for fun. My approach might not work so well if guitar playing is your job.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#24
I'm new to the guitar. I started playing about 3 or 4 weeks ago. I have been using Rocksmith and Rocksmith 2014 to learn and I learned more in one week (roughly 30 hours) from Rocksmith than I was ever able to learn in my own. My biggest obstacles were lack of motivation and an inability to make a noticeable improvement in a reasonable amount of time. Rocksmith is making learning the Guitar fun all the time. I can learn songs that I know and love and the mini games make practicing chords and scales fun too. It might be just what she needs to breath some new life into her desire to lean this complex instrument. Rocksmith has given me a new confidence and passion for the guitar. I feel now that I will never stop playing. I always think about it when I'm at work and stay up late playing and improving my skills. I am getting close to being able to play Radiohead's High and Dry without the assistance of the game. If interested I could post a video of my improvements to show you how far I've come since I started playing.
#25
Quote by evilmoon11
I'm new to the guitar. I started playing about 3 or 4 weeks ago. I have been using Rocksmith and Rocksmith 2014 to learn and I learned more in one week (roughly 30 hours) from Rocksmith than I was ever able to learn in my own. My biggest obstacles were lack of motivation and an inability to make a noticeable improvement in a reasonable amount of time. Rocksmith is making learning the Guitar fun all the time. I can learn songs that I know and love and the mini games make practicing chords and scales fun too. It might be just what she needs to breath some new life into her desire to lean this complex instrument. Rocksmith has given me a new confidence and passion for the guitar. I feel now that I will never stop playing. I always think about it when I'm at work and stay up late playing and improving my skills. I am getting close to being able to play Radiohead's High and Dry without the assistance of the game. If interested I could post a video of my improvements to show you how far I've come since I started playing.


I really recommend either Rocksmith or Bandfuse for younger players who are just getting into guitar. The games are a lot of fun, great practice and give you the feeling of really playing with a band rather than sitting alone in a room plucking out notes. It's not the end-all of learning to play, of course, but a great way to keep it interesting and fun.
#26
To blame the issue on the teenage generation is just silly. Many people, including myself, began in their preteen/early teen years.

Further, trying guitar then deciding to not play isn't "giving up".

There's nothing wrong with not playing an instrument and there's nothing special about playing one. If it's worth it to you, you do it; if it's not, you don't. Putting guitar on people who aren't interested is nonsense.
#27
What about a game, like Guitarbots. I tried it and it works well. It doesn't get the press that Rocksmith gets, but it seems to be better for learning and it's actually using tab instead of some proprietary notation system like Rocksmith.

I'd ditch the notation reading unless she's playing classical or jazz and that's usually not a decision a beginner is ready for. Children learn to speak before they learn to read. That's too much to learn for a complete beginner.
#28
I agree with the people saying that she's probably getting overwhelmed by all the stuff she's trying to learn.

Only playing for four months I think she should just focus on fun things mostly. It is important that she plays some chords and scales but only if she truly wants too. Maybe she just wants to know how to play songs and doesn't want to become a great guitarist. People who only want to play basic songs don't really need to learn the more complex stuff.
#29
^ Yeah. The "right" way is what works for you and lets you accomplish what you want.

Quote by johnturner9
To blame the issue on the teenage generation is just silly. Many people, including myself, began in their preteen/early teen years.

Further, trying guitar then deciding to not play isn't "giving up".

There's nothing wrong with not playing an instrument and there's nothing special about playing one. If it's worth it to you, you do it; if it's not, you don't. Putting guitar on people who aren't interested is nonsense.


+1

As I said above, you shouldn't overwhelm yourself with the theory at the start, and maybe your cousin just hasn't found a way to make it fun, so trying some different ways of learning may well be worthwhile. But if she's given it a good shot and genuinely just doesn't like it... there's no shame in giving up. As I said, there may be other things she'd rather do which are no more or less "constructive" than guitar.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?