#1
Eyy

So, I may have impulsively signed up for a study-abroad class next semester that involves scuba diving

And obviously to get scuba certified you have to know how to swim. 200 meter swim and 10 minutes treading apparently.

I have no swimming ability whatsoever. Certification tests are in February. Do I have enough time to learn to swim to that ability, or should I drop the class before payment goes through?
#4
It always surprises me that there are people who can't swim. Everyone gets swimming lessons when they're young around here.
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#5
Are you going to be practicing swimming like every day? Haven't been properly swimming for a while but 200m doesn't seem like something you can reach in 4 weeks or so starting from the beginning.


edit: yeah I remember it'll took a few months of weekly lessons before I could get through 4 lengths, maybe you're really amazing and can compress that fast, I don't teach swimming so don't take my word on any of this.
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#6
Quote by theguitarist
Are you going to be practicing swimming like every day? Haven't been properly swimming for a while but 200m doesn't seem like something you can reach in 4 weeks or so starting from the beginning.


edit: yeah I remember it'll took a few months of weekly lessons before I could get through 4 lengths, maybe you're really amazing and can compress that fast, I don't teach swimming so don't take my word on any of this.


See, that's what I was thinking.

Everyone was like, "Oh you'll be fine, I learned in 30 minutes!"

Yet these people have been swimming all their lives. I currently sink. And I have a full time job and classes are going to start Jan. 13th so I wouldn't have much time to fit in practice anyway. Yeah, I'm going to remove it from my schedule. I can probably learn this summer and go for it next year.
#7
If you can't swim and aren't confident in your ability to learn, why the hell would you sign up to something that requires swimming in open water?

It's not that hard to learn, but you will need to take lessons 2-3 times a week. Treading water for 10 minutes will get very tiring and then you'll probably have to do the 200m swim straight after without a break whilst you're still in the water. Its highly unlikely you'll pass if you only swim once a week.
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#8
Quote by the bartender
It always surprises me that there are people who can't swim. Everyone gets swimming lessons when they're young around here.



I missed the free ones because I left one school just before they did their swimming lessons and the school I moved to alreadydid theirs a year earlier. Eventually got private lessons starting out with 5-7 y.o kids when I was 12, so awkward, but I learned and moved up fast and got decent enough to start competing possibly before I dropped that to partake in the illustrious world of guitar playing and being a nu metal kiddie.
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#9
Quote by OddOneOut
If you can't swim and aren't confident in your ability to learn, why the hell would you sign up to something that requires swimming in open water?

It's not that hard to learn, but you will need to take lessons 2-3 times a week. Treading water for 10 minutes will get very tiring and then you'll probably have to do the 200m swim straight after without a break whilst you're still in the water. Its highly unlikely you'll pass if you only swim once a week.



Pretty much this.

Any physical capable adult can "learn to swim" in a matter of hours, maybe a couple of days to get confident. But it's a very different kind of stamina to say, running 200m or cycling.
That's what will take the time. As you tire, your technique gets more and more sloppy so you essentially want to get to the point where you can do 200m without tiring, and 10 minutes of constant motion (treading) without tiring.
That isn't going to happen overnight, and it won't just happen by pushing yourself without resting.
#10
Kinda like signing up to race a fast car yet not even knowing how to ride a bike. I'm sure you'll be fine; make sure you practice alone and with little or no safety devices as that will hurt your technique.
#11
Honestly, swimming is ridiculously easy. I learned when I was like 4, I think you can pull it off
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#14
I think you can learn in time. When you learn to glide after each stroke for a second or so, dexterity should be much of a problem anymore. Just don't panic
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#15
Took me about 6-7 sessions to be get confident enough to swim on the deep side of the pool. Those sessions were spaced out across a few months, but if you really really want to learn how to swim, you could probably manage in a month, but given your circumstances I'm not sure how you'd fit all the lessons in.
#16
I too think that you can learn in time. You should definitely attempt to find a good teacher posthaste, but the basic requirements for open water scuba certification are not really that hard. Treading water for ten minutes, with the use of your arms/hands, is not really difficult at all. Also, the 200m open water swim (is it open water or for 4 laps in an olympic pool?) is pretty easy because you can use whichever stroke you want and I don't think you have a time limit.

What agency are you trying to get certified through? PADI?

Once you have the basics of swimming down, which should take like a week tops, I recommend the book Total Immersion to improve on your technique.

PS I'm not fantastic swimmer or anything.
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#17
Learning to swim seems to be more mental than physical. The motions required to propel one or keep one afloat in water are actually rather natural. It's getting over the possiblity of drowing that seems to ruin it for some people.

Start in water shallow enough for you to stand up in...

Slowly crouch down until the water is about neck height...

Lean forward and push off with your feet and try to put your hands forward in a Superman-like fashion...

With your hands cupped, turn them as if trying to open a set of curtains and pull...

You should feel yourself begin to float forward

Keeping yourself relatively parallel to the water's surface should keep you from sinking too quickly...

Continuing to paddle should keep you afloat for the most part...

Treading water is kind of similar except you do it perpendicular to the water's surface... It's almost as though you're trying to swim higher than the surface of the water if that makes any sense...
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#19
Depends on how old you are...I learned to swim well...I can't remember when because I was so young but It can be done in a month if you practice daily I guess...It's just like riding a bike. Except exchange balance with learning how to stay afloat and move at the same time.
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#21
You'll be able to learn how to swim, it's really not difficult. What you may have trouble with is your endurance, as it's different from any other type of cardio exercise.

edit: I think you can do it, but you better start now and do it often.
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Last edited by eGraham at Dec 31, 2013,
#23
I'm actually a PADI instructor. Just so you know, the swim test can be done with any stroke you like and has no time limit. So if you find (for example) the back stroke easier, you can do that. You can also change stroke at anytime.

The "treading water" section also doesn't require actually treading water, just keeping your head out of the water without touching the bottom, holding onto something, etc. So again, lazily floating on your back is fine if you find that easier.

Get as much practice in as you can and focus on pacing yourself so you cover the distance. Don't worry about speed or anything.

Also, if you do find you can't manage in time, but want to try again; the swim test isn't required to do the classroom or pool work. So your instructor can sign you off for that. That way, you can try again after some practice and will only have to complete the swim + open water sessions.
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#24
Quote by lyonk55
I'm actually a PADI instructor. Just so you know, the swim test can be done with any stroke you like and has no time limit. So if you find (for example) the back stroke easier, you can do that. You can also change stroke at anytime.

The "treading water" section also doesn't require actually treading water, just keeping your head out of the water without touching the bottom, holding onto something, etc. So again, lazily floating on your back is fine if you find that easier.

Get as much practice in as you can and focus on pacing yourself so you cover the distance. Don't worry about speed or anything.

Also, if you do find you can't manage in time, but want to try again; the swim test isn't required to do the classroom or pool work. So your instructor can sign you off for that. That way, you can try again after some practice and will only have to complete the swim + open water sessions.


Where do you dive at in Scotland?
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#25
The Loch Ness, obviously.

edit: I wiki'd it just because and I never knew how ****ing huge it is. 755ft maximum depth
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Last edited by eGraham at Dec 31, 2013,
#26
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Where do you dive at in Scotland?


I dive in Loch Long and Loch Fyne mostly, but I try to get out into the North Sea around the boarders when I can. A lot nicer than people expect.

Cold, but nice.
Obligatory gear list
Guitars
Ibanez SZ4020 w/BKP Miracle Man set
Cort X-11 w/EMG 85+81
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Epiphone SG Prophecy w/Seymour Duncan/Ibz
Basses
Indie Swamp 4
Ibanez BTB 775 PB
Amps
Engl Screamer 50
#27
Find a number to call where you can ask this question, like the school that you're taking this course at, where you're getting the scuba certification, place like that.