#1
Hello all.

I recently bought my first guitar kit online, which is an SG style.

When I did my 'dry-fit' of parts however, I noticed that the mounts for my bridge and stopbar slide right into the pre-drilled holes (i.e. I do not need to hammer them in).

What is the easiest way for me to remedy this, so that my mounts stay secure?

Thanks.
#2
Do you have any pictures or measurements for how far off they are? Also, what finish will you be using on the body? If they slide in flush with the hole, there's a good chance that paint will give them a bit more grip.

Anyway, the most important thing to check is that they don't wobble from side to side or rotate with the posts. Once the bridge is on and the strings are under tension, they'll hold the bushings down and in the guitar. If they move from side to side or rotate when you adjust the post heights, I'd suggest contacting the kit manufacturer. You could dowel the holes and re-drill them, but that isn't something you should need to do.
#3
You can wrap paper around the posts as a shim to tighten them in their holes. The bridge should be pushed straight down by the string tension, so looseness isn't a problem there. The tailpiece needs to be tight in its holes to prevent it from being rotated foreward by the string pull. You can also glue the studs in.
#4
Multiple turns of plumbers teflon tape is a good finish if the fit is almost there.

If the gaps are large enough that the studs spin or wobble within the hole then Minty is right, contact the kit seller and if needed send it back.
Attachments:
teflon.jpg
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Last edited by Phoenix V at Jan 2, 2014,
#5
If the these bushings are held in with paper or PTFE tape then you are going to limit the vibration transfer to the body of the guitar and it'll have poor sustain.

The best fix depends on how bad a fit they are but what I would do is cut some thin strips of wood and use these as shims in the hole to make the fit tight. Once you know it's going to be a tight fit, add a tiny amount of wood glue to the outside edge of the shims and push everything home - you may want to remove the studs later.

Should sort it out without ruining the sustain.

P.S don't forget to put the ground wire in from the control cavity 😜
#6
If the gaps are large enough that it needs strips of wood to make good interference fits, then honestly I'd just send it back.
'It takes 100 guitar players to change a light. One to change the light and 99 to stand around pointing, saying..."Yeah man, look...I can do that too"...'

My gear is in my Profile

Builds & Refurbs
Hondo 780 Deluxe
Gibson Studio
Epi LP100
#7
Yeh it's a good point, but you've got to think how much did you pay for the kit? £100?

It's not going to be an amazing guitar anyway, use it to practice some skills on and then do what I did - by a good quality body and neck separately and source good parts yourself and make a really good playable guitar with the skills you learnt on that.

Worked for me 😃
#8
Hey guys, thanks for all the quick responses.

More info here.
1) I am going to stain the guitar, to highlight the flame maple top it has (i.e. no paint).
2) All four holes are about 0.5 mm too big for the pins.

With this in mind, what seems my best course of action?
I'm leaning towards shimming them, but what do you all think?

Also, I have contacted the seller to see what my options are there as well.

Cheers. :-)