#1
Hi there everybody!

I just created a very small band with two friends. It's me on guitar, Cornelia on bass and Victoria as our singer.

We have just started playing together, but we all agree on taking this project seriously. The thing is I have never recorded a band before. Just some solo guitar pieces by myself. What kind of recording equipment will I need? I get that I will need some microphones, a soundcard and some software, but where is a good place to start it? Keep in mind that our budget is really quite low.

We know a few drummers and probably will recruit one of them so bearing that in mind when buying equipment would be nice!

Best Regards Martin

P.S. I'm thinking of starting out with something like this and record everything seperately. Is that a good idea? http://www.amazon.co.uk/FOCUSRITE-SCARLETT-STUDIO-studio-packs/dp/B00AW91CPG/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1388680190&sr=8-2&keywords=focusrite+scarlett+2i2
#2
That link you sent doesn't work. The focusrite Scarlett interfaces are good but get one better than the 2i2 (I have a 2i2 so I'm speaking from experience). It may be cheaper and better quality to go to a local studio to get a demo done to be honest. If you wish to set up microphones over your drum kit you're going to need like a 6 channel interface, so now we're talking in hundreds before you even buy your microphones. You then need to learn how to mix your music.

For software, I recommend Reaper. Watch some tutorials on it first, watch a lot of tutorials on recording and mixing before you decide to spend a lot of money on gear that you possibly won't be able to put to it's best use. I've been home recording for about 2 years now using a 2i2 and I feel like I'm at an acceptable level, so it can take quite a while to get good at it.
Last edited by AJScott at Jan 2, 2014,
#3
Quote by AJScott
That link you sent doesn't work. The focusrite Scarlett interfaces are good but get one better than the 2i2 (I have a 2i2 so I'm speaking from experience). It may be cheaper and better quality to go to a local studio to get a demo done to be honest. If you wish to set up microphones over your drum kit you're going to need like a 6 channel interface, so now we're talking in hundreds before you even buy your microphones. You then need to learn how to mix your music.

For software, I recommend Reaper. Watch some tutorials on it first, watch a lot of tutorials on recording and mixing before you decide to spend a lot of money on gear that you possibly won't be able to put to it's best use. I've been home recording for about 2 years now using a 2i2 and I feel like I'm at an acceptable level, so it can take quite a while to get good at it.



Ok thanks a lot! Well I have been looking at the 2i4 as well, but I guess I will ask the guys at my local music store when I get there next week (my electric guitar is in need of service ). Yeah ok so recording drums is out of the question in the early states of this band. Haha if we're going to do that I'm probably just gonna pay to record in a professional studio
#4
Try and look for the Focusrite 8i6 (or anything in that league, NI Komplete 6 and the likes). Its not that huge of a price leap from the 2i2 and it'll be a good investment. As for the DAW, as aj said, Reaper would be a good starting point. Research will be your friend there. Its free if I'm not mistaken. But at a certain point, I'd recommend a bigger DAW (Cubase and the likes)

You're right, drums are best recorded at a higher end studio unless you're ready to dish out your grandpas pension on equipment. Although programmed drums would be easier on the pocket and produce a respectable result.
#5
Quote by DreamGate
Try and look for the Focusrite 8i6 (or anything in that league, NI Komplete 6 and the likes). Its not that huge of a price leap from the 2i2 and it'll be a good investment. As for the DAW, as aj said, Reaper would be a good starting point. Research will be your friend there. Its free if I'm not mistaken. But at a certain point, I'd recommend a bigger DAW (Cubase and the likes)

You're right, drums are best recorded at a higher end studio unless you're ready to dish out your grandpas pension on equipment. Although programmed drums would be easier on the pocket and produce a respectable result.


Thanks!