#1
I bought a used Yamaha Pacifica 112J last summer for $100. I mainly bought it because i wanted to practice refretting on guitars but it was also a really good deal.

The main components of the guitar are actually quite nice, its is a solid alder body, maple neck and rosewood fret board, with a transparent green finish. Buying the raw materials alone to even build from scratch would be more expensive than $100. So, Instead of just re-fretting this cheap knock off strat i am gonna do a complete rebuild and pimp it out.

This build will be done using mostly tools that are cheap and readily available, so that people who don't have access to $expensive$ tools can still achieve the same mods.

I have done mods in the past but this is my first time doing modifications to this extent.

I will try to post in a step by step order so others can learn from my mods and my mistakes.

I originally tried to post this on another forum but my account was suspened....

Here are pics of the original guitar:


#2
This first thing I did was take apart the guitar and sand down the body to remove the original finish

Front face sanded


I did a rough trace out for a floyd rose, using templates from the floyd rose website


Back face sanded

I did not completely sand the back because i plan on painting it all black anyway
#3
I was about to say I really liked the green finish

Will be interesting to see how a refretting affects a cheap guitar. Don't neglect the nut either.

I think the biggest issue you will encounter is intonation. Most of these cheap things have terribly positioned bridges/odd scale lengths.

Looking forward to seeing how this turns out!
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#5
Now here is the fun part
i ordered these following parts throughout the months of NOV and DEC

3 BG pickups: 2xP90's and 1 x humbucker (the PUF)



Locking tuners


Gold heavy duty Floyd tremolo from GFS



I originally wanted to use a LSR roller nut but they only sell it in one length which was far to large for the pacifica neck, luckily another vendor sold roller type nuts of the exact width of the neck of the pacifica 1-5/8"


Roller string trees


Im planning to put in a recessed floyd rose, but a conventional locking nut wil not fit on the neck, so instead I will use a roller nut, roller string tree and locking tuners. This should be stable enough to hold tuning during divebombs, additionally it is a lot simplier to change tunings and strings.
#6
Quote by N_J_B_B
I was about to say I really liked the green finish

Will be interesting to see how a refretting affects a cheap guitar. Don't neglect the nut either.

I think the biggest issue you will encounter is intonation. Most of these cheap things have terribly positioned bridges/odd scale lengths.

Looking forward to seeing how this turns out!



actually yamaha pacificas are fantastic guitars, in canada the 112J range from 300-399

The original frets were in great condition i just wanted to practice refretting.

I purchased a beautiful vintage ibanez les paul which had extremely worn frets, almost flush with the fret board, and i wanted to practice refretting on a cheapie guitar before doing anything to the les paul
#7
So far the parts cost me approximately $500 (including the shipping + tax)

I know alot of you ruthless penny hunters are thinking why would i put $500 in to a $100 guitar, when i can just buy a brand new one for that price??

Story of the pacifica:
Well, yamaha pacificas actually has some sentimental (not sure if right word..) value to me. When i first started out playing guitar i rented a crappy acoustic guitar and saved up my money for an electric guitar and amp. When i went in to the music shop i saw the line of yamaha pacificas in multiple different colours, and i reallly wanted it. When i picked it up and started to play it, it just felt right... its kinda hard to explain, but im sure most of you know that "feel" im talking about. It doesnt have to be the most expensive or well built guitar to "feel right". If i bought this guitar than i would not have enough left over for a guitar amp. Since i really needed an amp I just bought a cheaper behringer set instead that came with a guitar and amp. I actually sanded down the behringer guitar down later and found out it was a ply wood guitar. The behringer guitar was a huge mistake i should have started with the pacifica. I was never able to get a pacifica untill i finally saw a 112J for sale used and decided to pick it up.


TLDR: The yamaha pacifica was essentially the guitar that i always wanted when i was a kid, and now i finally have one, so i don't mind putting in $$$ for it.


The largest percentage of the money i spent was on the pickups, and heavy duty floyd rose. You could easily use a cheaper set or even used pickups. you could also buy a cheaper floyd rose, or a used one.

If i opt to go a cheaper route i would have bought a used set of picks ups or GFS pickups and cheap chinese made tremolo, or even a used one. It would probably cost around 100-200$ total for the mod if i did it this way....but then it wouldn't be a super strat would it??
#8
I know what you mean with a guitar feeling 'right'. I still love my first Epi SG I got (Korean made). I don't know if it's because it's the guitar I learnt on but man it feels good in my hands - I just seem to play better on it.

I did mod it a lot though and I also set it up well with the help of my old guitar teacher (techy)
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#9
Some people say pacificas are better strats than actual fender strats. Good luck on the project!
#10
I've always liked the look of Pacificas and they have a good reputation. Never played one though. Maybe when I've shifted a few of my current stock I'll see if I can pick one up.

This is looking like a good project and I'll be checking in. Don't bet on the lack of a locking nut making changing tunings any easier though. Knife-edge trems are all about balancing the spring and string tensions: change the tuning and you change the string tension so you have to change the spring tension to restore the balance.
#11
Really neat project. I will definitely follow along just to see how things fit together, especially the re-fret. As far as the logic of putting a bunch of money into an inexpensive guitar, hey, love isn't logical! I have some guitars that most people would consider not-so-great, but I wouldn't give them up because they mean a lot to me. So I'm totally with you on this one.

One specific question, how did you sand off the original finish? Did you use a chemical stripper and then a power sander? Or some other method?
#12
Quote by von Layzonfon
I've always liked the look of Pacificas and they have a good reputation. Never played one though. Maybe when I've shifted a few of my current stock I'll see if I can pick one up.

This is looking like a good project and I'll be checking in. Don't bet on the lack of a locking nut making changing tunings any easier though. Knife-edge trems are all about balancing the spring and string tensions: change the tuning and you change the string tension so you have to change the spring tension to restore the balance.


I ment that as in you dont need allen keys to unlock the nut so it is one less step, from a whole bunch of other steps so percentage wise it doesnt decrease alot but no having to deal with that locking nut also means i dont really have to worry about those fine tuners as well


On another note, im glad to see most of you understand that "feel"


i shall proceed with as many steps as i can today, my goal is to finish the guitar before monday
#13
Ok here is the most precise part of the entire process in my opinion, installing the recessed floyd rose.


So the first thing i did was put in the low and high e strings in the floyd rose and guitar just to make sure it lines up nicely with then neck.

determine approximately where the endpoint of your original setup was.

in this case there was a vintage tremolo installed originally in the pacifica, i used calipers to determine where the strings originally ended starting from the closest edge of the pickup cavity. I placed the floyd rose in a position which would also have the same end point for the strings, such that the scale would be maintained.

So essentially you attach both E strings to guide you when lining up the tremolo and at the same time Maintain the same end point for the strings so the scale doesnt change. Make sure the tremolo is held in place, i used tape to hold in down.

then i went to floyd rose official website since the have pdf files of floyd cut outs which are to scale (make select the "to scale" option in your printer). Once printed out i cut out the floyd tracing to basically create a stencil and literally placed it on top of my tremolo that was held in place using tape. I adjusted the stencil by eye so that the lines were parallel. You could measure them to be exact if you want, but i felt that if it was of by a little it would not be noticable.
***make sure the stencil you created fits your floyd rose. The original pdf from the floyd website will be a starting point, that must be adjusted to fit for most.

Once I placed the stencil in a good orientation to where my taped down floyd tremolo was, i removed the taped tremolo and traced the stencil (seen below)



Edit: You can also see the edge of the tremolo hole looks rough, its because i needed to widen it with a chisel so that the floyd trem would fit. Make sure you adjust things to fit as you go.
Last edited by KevinKNg at Jan 3, 2014,
#14
Now i dont see any way around making the recess than using a electric router, or hand router. Electric routers are pretty cheap now (cheaper than hand plane type routers) grab a used one for $25-50, its an extremely useful tool which you will be thankful for having in the future. This is the only power tool i feel is required.

In the pdf privided by the floyd wesite, there is a page which tells you the depth of each recess, follow and adjust your router for height.

There are two ways to go about doing this. If you feel you will only use one type and model of tremolo multiple times (i.e you are making the same recess multiple times) i recommend making a guide for your router so that you cut the perfect holes each time.

The second way, if your like me, you will probably use multiple different types of tremolos. variety its the spice of life right? In my case i set my router to a lower RPM (optional) and cut out the holes with the router freehand. I went as close to the line as possible with the router. I then cleaned everything up with a chisel. Here is my end result:

**the top edge of the tremolo looks crooked and curvy, but that curved line is just saw dust. This is caused by my blurry photo
#15
Ill condense the steps for you guys:

1) attach low and high E-string to guitar and floyd trem, line it up properly so the strings arent trailing off the neck

2) Determine end point of the original setup (i used calipers). use a reference edge to measure from. in this case i used the closest pickup cavity edge.

3) place tremolo so that strings line up and end point is maintained. Tape the tremolo down

4) Get pdf outlines of a floyd (from floyd official website). Cut out the outlines to make a stencil that can be placed on top of the tremolo. Adjust the stencil so it fits nicely

5) Place your stencil over the taped tremolo and tape down you fitted stencil. You can now remove the tremolo

6) trace out the stencil, and you can remove the stencil at this point or leave it on for now it doesnt matter.

7) determin depth to cut recess for the floyd trem, this should be detailed in the pdf you downloaded from the floyd website

8) 2 options, a and b

8a) Make a template for you router to cut out the recess (only good if you are going to do the same cut multiple timess)

-OR-

8b) Use the router free hand, and cut as close to the drawn stencil lines as possible, then clean it up with a chisel

Now the recess for the floyd trem is complete!
#16
Now you have to drill the stud post. Since most of your are poor like me, you dont have a drill press, or you don't have room for one. I will show you how I drilled perfect holes without a drill press.

The most imprtant component for this was the stud post that were attached by a metal bar.
I first painted the underside of the two post and stamped it on to a piece of paper.


I then took the stamped paper and placed it in the recess where it will be drilled. I grabbed my tremolo and lined it up in the recess properly. I moved the stamped paper untill the holes lined up with my perfectly postioned tremolo. This part is a bit finicky, because you are moving the tremolo at same time as the stamped paper which barely stick out underneath the tremolo. Once the stamped paper is positioned correctly I taped it down.


I had to epoxy some of my mistakes, i used this wood filler epoxy stuff. This is a special message to you guys, take your time please, and you won't need to use epoxy, its smells like crap, literally.


Ok so now the stamped piece of paper is positioned directly where the stud post should be. So what did i do next? i took the stud posts and taped it on top of the stamps:


Make sure you tape down the stud post better than i did, i almost royally F***** up. Better yet use a clamp or get someone to hold it for you.


Now here comes the part where i was really glad this trem came with studpost that were attached by a metal bar.

I removed the studs (screws) and left the bushings taped down. These post are perfect guides to drill. So i took a drill bit that was a little smaller in diamater as the bushings, and used the bushings as a guide to drill straight down. Make sure the drill bit isn't to big or you will strip those bushings. I widened the drilled holes to a size that was just a little bit smaller than the bushings. (if the hole is too small your wood will split, if you are unsure take a test piece of wood and try it out first, thats what i did).
The drilled holes were perfect and i tapped in those bushings without a problem. No drill press necessary.
I dont have a pic of the tapped in bushings but i will bring them up in later posts
Last edited by KevinKNg at Jan 3, 2014,
#17
I went to a lumber store that carried exotic woods, and picked up some beautiful ash olive burl veneer the other day. It was originally dry, very lumpy and uneven. I sandwiched the venner between some newspapers, and sprayed it generously with water, i then clamped it in between some extra particle board i found in my house.



I unclamped the particle board to reveal a perfectly flattened veneer:



**do not use newspaper for this because some of the ink will transfer to the wood, use plain printer paper instead**

A few things i want to mention is that, i did go overboard with clamps. You dont need clamps for this, a couple of heavy weights will also work. I have nice bar clamps which i was able to pick up on sale 75% off. You could easily buy any used clamps for alot cheaper, even large C clamps which i usually see on sale used for 1-2$. clamps aren't completely necessary but it just makes life a lot easier.
Last edited by KevinKNg at Jan 3, 2014,
#18
Now that my veneer is nice and flat i book matched it. You can tell from the picture above that the veneer edges were not straight. This is where the bulk of my mistakes occur.

I rushed in trying to align the two veneer pieces, I also didnt have proper tools to give a straight cut. I used a razor blade and sand paper to try my best at aligning it. It was perfect but i did not have time to make it any better.

In hind sight i should have purchased a proper veneer saw and cut the veneer using a straight edge guide. This would have given me perfect alignment. I highly recommend getting a veneer saw they are inexpensive, and will give you good edges for bookmatching.
#19
I drew a line on the guitar where i wanted the center/fold of the two veneer pieces to be. I aligned the veneer pieces and taped them together.

I want to glue the veneer on the guitar surface, this require pressure to be applied on the veneer to ensure a strong bond. The conventional method is to use a vacuum pump or shopvac, place the guitar and glued veneer in a vacuum bag. Then the bag is vacuum applying even pressure to the entire guitar. I Have a strong shop vac, but i know that most of you guys dont, so I did it without a shop vac.


To apply pressure to the venner, i used the same pieces of particle board that i used earlier to flatten the veneer, and purchased some 1.5 inch thick Styrofoam for $5. I cut the particle board in to square that are a little bigger than the guitar. I cut the styrofoam and glued them to the pieces of particle board. Any hard flat board will work, mdf, ply wood, or even wood. these materials combined should be cheaper than buying a vacuum bag alone. The pacifica has a curve from the forearm cut, so a completely flat surface is not sufficient to apply even pressure. To get around this glue another piece of styrafoam where you expect the forearm cut to be and carve it in a similar shape to the forearm cut. I was in a rush at this point, since i had to be somewhere and was already 1/2 and hour late. Instead of carving the styrafoam like i should have i just cut a corner of the styofoam particle board glue up.


I brushed on a layer of elmers probond max glue, any waterproof glue should work. Elmer's pro bond was readily available so that's what i used. I placed the veneer on the glued guitar surface, making sure to align the center where the two veneer edges meet to the line i drew earlier.

I sandwiched the guitar between the styrofoam particle board layer i constructed. I then clamped the cut off corner piece to the curved fore arm cut. The rest of the guitar was then clamped down.



The poorly clamped corner piece where the forearm cut is



The rest of the guitar clamped:

The tape is necessary to hold together the corner piece.

The Styrofoam should mold to the guitar and apply even pressure throught the entire guitar surface, making a strong bond between guitar and veneer.
#20
You can NEVER have too many clamps in a woodshop.

I always thought Pacificas were made with good wood. The frets were a little iffy, but very decent guitars. I really liked the cheap acoustics Yamaha made - had a nice tone even when left out in the rain or soaked in whiskey and dropped a few times.

A little late, but there is a neat trick you can do with just a razorblade and you don't even need a straightedge or even cut the two pieces straight to match them perfectly. Just lay one sheet on top of the other and cut them both at the same time. You can have the waviest hand cutting them and they will still line up perfectly. Get the bookmatch right, of course.

Whatever you do, make sure you put some extra love into it.
#21
Quote by 1152
You can NEVER have too many clamps in a woodshop.

I always thought Pacificas were made with good wood. The frets were a little iffy, but very decent guitars. I really liked the cheap acoustics Yamaha made - had a nice tone even when left out in the rain or soaked in whiskey and dropped a few times.

A little late, but there is a neat trick you can do with just a razorblade and you don't even need a straightedge or even cut the two pieces straight to match them perfectly. Just lay one sheet on top of the other and cut them both at the same time. You can have the waviest hand cutting them and they will still line up perfectly. Get the bookmatch right, of course.

Whatever you do, make sure you put some extra love into it.


i tried that but it never came out right. i tried multiple things to get perfect edge for veneer but none of them really worked out.

a pacificas are great guitars for the $$$, i have seen professional musicians who still use pacificas,
#22
Cool thread, cant wait to see how that veneer turned out. Ive got a yamaha rgx that Ive been thinking of modding. Its already got a no-name floating trem, but I dont think a real floyd would fit without modification.
Last edited by dropb81 at Jan 7, 2014,
#23
Ok so i removed the clamps to reveal the guitar

there were several issues, mainly around the edges, there was a large crack on one of the horns and the butt of the guitar a large piece of veneer was chipped off. I wasn't completely happy about this. The main reason the venner cracked was that it was to dry when i glued it to the guitar surface. It took me too long to prepare a straight joining edge, so the wood dried out.

To avoid my mistake make sure you work fast, as soon as you remove the veneer from the flattening process. The veneer should still be damp and pliable when gluing to the guitar. This should avoid cracks.

another issue i had was a large bubble that formed right at the cusp where the forearm cut meets the main guitar body. This bubble was created by my rush angled clamping. You should carve the stryfoam to fit the forearm curve, do not use the method i did.

I managed to fix the bubble by ironing out the bubble on the lowest setting.

Another issue was that the veneer edge i worked so hard to match overlapped. I do not know why this happened, it may have to do with the fact that parts of the wood were dry and started to lump and become uneven, so after i clamped and flattened the two pieces again the edge positions were shifted. i had to sand it down to level, which left


***it is extremely important to make sure the venner is still damp and flat before gluing it to the guitar**

I filled in all bick cracks and holes with epoxy, and the small holes/cracks were filled with glue and dust from sanding.

The majority of the problems occurred on the very edge of the guitar, which was the only reason why i did not strip the thing and start over. I am going to edge the guitar with black so the cracks and holes wont show up anyway, any other mistake is covered by the pick guard. I just have to make sure the surface is level before painting.

The largest disappointment so far was that i didnt utilize my veneer to its full beauty, i wanted to capture the central pattern whcih kind of look like fangs, but i wasnt able to get the edge straight enough in time so i had to settle. I was also in a rush to do it, so that didnt help either.

Here is a pic:

you can see the joining edge of the veneers at this point looks very sloppy as well as the edges where i epoxied the chipped of veneer pieces.
Last edited by KevinKNg at Jan 7, 2014,
#24
the ash olive burl veneer is extremely porous, so it is essential imho that you fill the pores.
Keeping on with the cheap/easy accessible theme, i felt the most appropriate method to fill the pores is with drywall paste. Many people have use this technique with sucess so i wanted to give it a try.

Procedure for Drywall paste/putty method for filling in pores:
1)buy some putty at the local hardware store (should be around $5)

2) buy some water soluble dye this is very cheap stuff (i used cheap minwax water based colored stain, this stuff is very easy to get. If you have access to water soluble aniline dye they will give you the same results or better, also aniline dyes are a lot cheaper, just not as readily available)

3)get some putty, and add the colour to it **make sure the colour you add is in a liquid form** (i.e if you are using powders add it to water first before mixing)

4) mix a generous amount of colourant in the putty, the putty should be far darker than the final colour you want. (in this case i wanted brown, but i mixed so much colour in the drywall putty it was black brown similar to the colour of dark chocolate)

5)take the coloured putty and apply to the guitar surface

**APPLY IT IN A VERY THIN LAYER** I cannot stress this enough, the first time i did this i applied a very thick layer almost 4mm thick and let it dry. when i sanded it down it looked terrible. use a very thin coat it is all you need, it should be thin enough so that you can see all the wood grain still. I applied it by using a cheap wall scrapper. I scrapped around a thick mess of coloured putty and then i wiped off the excess. The pic i posted previously (post #23) is a pic of what it looks like if you apply to thick a mixture and let it dry.

If you apply a thin layer this is what the result should look like:




The purpose of filling the pores is so that you have a nice flat level surface to paint on, this makes the guitar look alot less "rough". I highly recommend this step for any porous wood such as mahogany. This step also brings out the wood grain more so it has multiple benefits.
#25
After i let everything dry I sanded everything down nice and smooth, I made sure any gaps or holes were filled and leveled.

No i can apply the stains. There are 2 main methods of doing this, i used Method 2 listed below:

Method 1 (simplest, yet requires the most prep, and cannot be done on all wood veneers)
1) take dye and apply straight to guitar (spray gun, brush, cloth it doesnt really matter)

The wood absorbs the dye. The problem with this method is that the wood surface must be prestine, any glue stains, or glue bleeding through the veneer will not stain properly. also epoxied surface present a problem. water can also cause bubbling in the veneer. This method can also look very splotchy and uneven, because of the wood speices or other factors out of your control. I do not recommend this for veneers unless you have 100% confidence that you will not screw up. My veneering was no where near perfect so this method was not even an option

Method 2 (more steps but better and consistents results regardless of surface, and much more versatile. I believe this method is much more commonly used in industry).

1) take water base dye and make sure it is in a liquid solution
2) get some water based clear coat finish
3) add the liquid dye to the water based clear coat **it should be a tad darker than the final colour you wish to achieve**

(method 2 is also called shader coats, or toner coats)

This method is at its core different from method 1. The stain is not being absorbed by the wood anymore so any inconsistencies with the wood are inconsequential. What you are actually doing is giving the clear coat colour. This means that you will have a transparent coating that was coloured (think of a stained glass window, You are essentially doing the same thing). This can be used with any type of clear coat, as long as the dye you add is soluble in it.
Last edited by KevinKNg at Jan 7, 2014,
#26
This is the first shader coat, i used yellow water soluble aniline dye in varathane water based interior diamond wood finish. I wanted a cheap readily accessible clear coat that was also water based, and didn't yellow over time.


I applied it using lint free cloth in a very thin layer. You can see the container of yellow toner coat in the pic
Last edited by KevinKNg at Jan 7, 2014,
#27
while that was drying i started to pull the frets from the pacifica neck, and the ibanez les paul.

I took a soldering iron heated up the frets and pulled out one end of the fret at a time, slowly moving to the middle before pulling it out. I did this using cheap fret pullers.

here's a pic of a fret in the process of being pulled, for clarity:


A pic of my beautiful ibanez les paul next to the yamaha neck


And a pic of how leveled off the ibanez frets were


These frets were an absolute pain to pull. This guitar was made in 1972 and i dont think it has ever been refretted. I believe that the originals owners just kept sanding and leveling the frets.
#28
The ibanez frets are giving me a lot of issues. i ordered some standard stainless steel fretwire, and the tang width is far to small for the ibanez les paul, it just slips in and out. This ibanez sure is loose. This led me to believe that the guitar has been refretted at least once, however after inspecting the original frets with my calipers, it turns out the frets were just thick to begin with, and most likely was not refretted. I dont know where to get frets with thick tangs, If anyone knows of a vendor who sells it please tell me.

Now my ibanez is on hold till i can figure out what to do with it. I could just epoxy the frets, i know some famous luthiers do this but i want to avoid this. I could also buy those fret crimpers at stewmac, but for 69.99 thats outrageous. $70 for a pair of crimpers is insane there is no way on earth i could justify buying that even if i were a millionaire. If i pay 70$ for crimpers they better be made of rubies or something. I also heard in other forums that they wear extremely fast. I also dont understand what advantages crimping gives. Even crimping fret wire wont give you the same contact as a fret in a proper slot. it will only partially contact the wood. Is partially touching the wood of the neck for $70 that much better than poor contact and proper epoxying ($5)? I highly doubt the difference in tone and feel is worth the $70.

At least the frets for the pacifica fit perfectly, and they also don't need any radiusing either since they were luckily the right raduis to begin with.
#29
I managed to apply the rest of the shader coats over last weekend and monday.
I applied another layer of yellow shader coat and let it dry. I then wiped on a teal colour (i made by mixing blue and green) using lint free cloth. after it dried I wiped on a deep blue colour on the edge making sure to leave the previous teal edge alone. i tried to feather each edge to give a smooth transition from yellow to teal, to blue. I applied a black shader coat to edges, sides and back of the guitar, i did not want this to be transparent. I had to add ALOT of black dye so that the shader coat would be opaque.
I then did multiple clear coats (with no dye) using a foam brush. Each coat you apply can dissolve/melt the previous dried coat, so be aware of what colours your brush/cloth is picking up. I used this to my advantage when feathering colours to give a smoother transition/gradient of colours.

These are my results after colouring and clear coats

it actually appears more green than it is, because of the yellow light above the guitar. In proper lighting the edges are more blue. Also you can see that one horn of the pacifica is really messy, thats because that was my test area, the pickgaurd is covering it anyway so it doesnt really matter. The joining edges of the veneers also look a lot better after adding shader coats and all the epoxied cracks are non visible.
Last edited by KevinKNg at Jan 7, 2014,
#30
That now brings me up to today.

The steps i still have to do are:
-cut out pickguard
-wire guitar
-install floyd trem
-install roller nut
-hammer in frets
-finish frets
-put everything together
And
-put a sound clip or video of the guitar

I know the surface still looks a little rough but i cannot wetsand, buff or polish anything untill the clear coat has cured, this will take at least 3 weeks.

Does anyone have any recommendations for wiring 2xp90's and 1xhumbucker with 3 knobs (either vol-tone-tone or vol-vol-tone). the p90's are RWRP, and i also have a push pull pot availible.
#31
I'd like to try dying a guitar one day. It looks like it could be fun!

What colour pickguard are you going with? OR keeping the original white one?

Cool to watch the process and you have a lot of detail
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#33
Quote by KevinKNg
This first thing I did was take apart the guitar and sand down the body to remove the original finish

Front face sanded


I did a rough trace out for a floyd rose, using templates from the floyd rose website


Back face sanded

I did not completely sand the back because i plan on painting it all black anyway
I suggest you line the inside of the cavity with copper shielding,you can buy online,I modified my pac 112 XJ with seymores,locking tuners,all new electronics.Plays and sounds like a 3,000 guitar.they have a really narrow neck 41 mm 1 5/8 inch,use part number PT 6225 for a guitar nut[Black Tusq,from graph tech] that is close to Yamaha plastic nut # VB344800 which is now part number VB344801 in size.Invest in good electronic caliper to accurately make measurements on not only setting up the guitar but to fit parts.If your going to play with veneers,invest in a low cost vacuum bagging system,that will insure good all around adhesion of the veneer.Was their a problem with the frets or did you just want something better?good luck.
#34
Why the locking tuners when you will have a locking nut?
#35
Back from the dead, Sorry for the delay i got caught up with a load of stuff from school which carried over to the next semester. i will be done my final exam tomorrow, i wasn't able to do much to the guitar. I will post updates very soon.

Quote by J_W
Why the locking tuners when you will have a locking nut?


The problem with strats and most strat copies are that there is not enough room to add a locking nut. The pacifica has very little room to properly install a nut, and would require me to glue some additional wood. Locking tuners were the only viable option, and theoretically should work just fine.


I hope to finish the guitar within a week or two.