#1
i am not too good with theory but i recently became very interested in getting a different type of sound from my solos and i was wondering if it is possible to combine different modes in different keys. for example, if im playing in the key of Am, could i combine A aeolian with E phrygian dominant? i have noticed that different positions sound better together than others. if this makes sense theoretically, what other combinations fit together? i hope i dont sound like an idiot lol
#2
What do you exactly mean by combining? Mix notes from many scales? Well, it would probably end up sounding just very chromatic.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Jan 3, 2014,
#3
what i mean is that the notes in A aeolian are ABCDEFG, and the notes in E phrygian dominant the same with the exception that the G is raised a half a step. so what im wondering is that if i were to just play E phrygian shapes combined with A aeolian shapes but not play the G#, would that make sense?
#4
So you will just be playing the notes ABCDEFG? If so then you're just playing A minor.

The shapes would then be all the same. The shapes are just smaller parts of the larger A minor shape which is those same A minor notes (A B C D E F G) across the whole fretboard.
Si
#5
gotcha! thanks, i was getting kinda confused. i will continue to learn as much as i possibly can, i barely started trying to teach myself theory a couple months ago
#6
In this case I would call E phrygian dominant the A harmonic minor scale. But yeah, maybe learn some more theory first. Fancy scale names are fancy but they don't work everywhere. And many times there's a more simple explanation of using some notes than using an "exotic" scale. If you want to play the G#, you can play it. But you don't need to call it a different scale. You could just call it an accidental. It's all about the sound, not the scale name.
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#8
The point he's trying to make is that the name of the scale is determined by the sound, which is in turn dependent on the context those notes are being used in - you can't just start randomly chucking names at a group of notes without fully considering how they're being used.
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#9
Quote by Elintasokas
Sure, but the scale name also has a lot to do with the sound.


Well if I saw a cat, and called it a dog, would it then become a dog?

I haven't actually tried this before but I will find a cat tomorrow and report back.
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#10
Quote by AlanHB
Well if I saw a cat, and called it a dog, would it then become a dog?

I haven't actually tried this before but I will find a cat tomorrow and report back.

What I meant is that harmonic minor isn't going to sound like major and vice versa, etc. Scales tend to have their distinctive sounds, so the NOTES in the scale kind of are a big deal. Of course it's different in a modal context: e.g relative minor has the same notes as it's relative major but then the tonal center makes all the difference.

But after all he asked about modes so just ignore my post.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Jan 3, 2014,
#11
Quote by Elintasokas
Sure, but the scale name also has a lot to do with the sound.

Yeah. But do all scales need to have a name? Sometimes it's just easier to say that you are using the minor scale and accidental(s).

Quote by steven seagull
The point he's trying to make is that the name of the scale is determined by the sound, which is in turn dependent on the context those notes are being used in - you can't just start randomly chucking names at a group of notes without fully considering how they're being used.

Exactly.

We had a good example of this in this thread https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1627588 and somebody answered it used the blues scale when it didn't sound bluesy at all. The b5 accidental (actually #4) was just a chord tone of the secondary dominant.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#13
Key/scale borrowing (aka "modal mixture") is not unusual, but you need to understand why you're choosing to borrow from another scale before it'll sound much good. There's usually a harmonic basis for it, so make sure you know what chords are happening before you just go and throw in accidentals.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jan 4, 2014,
#14
Quote by Elintasokas
What I meant is that harmonic minor isn't going to sound like major and vice versa, etc. Scales tend to have their distinctive sounds, so the NOTES in the scale kind of are a big deal. Of course it's different in a modal context: e.g relative minor has the same notes as it's relative major but then the tonal center makes all the difference.

But after all he asked about modes so just ignore my post.


Well he incorrectly called A minor E phrygian. Quite common here
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#15
^ He actually called A harmonic minor E phrygian dominant.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#16
^^^ I reckon that the words "harmonic" and "dominant" have no bearing on TS's question. He just threw in some pretty words just for fun.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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