#1
What chord does the root, 4th, make? For example, E, A, I played it as a barre chord using different octaves and I really liked that variation so any help would be awesome.
Last edited by liloffshore at Jan 3, 2014,
#3
For some reason I read E A and D.

E and A is A5 power chord, but inverted. You're playing the 5th (E) in the bass Esther than A. But its still just a A5 power chord.
#4
Quote by mdc
For some reason I read E A and D.

E and A is A5 power chord, but inverted. You're playing the 5th (E) in the bass Esther than A. But its still just a A5 power chord.


I was looking around and if I'm not mistaking its an E sus4 (no5). If I strike the B note it should be E sus fourth.
#6
Quote by mdc
It depends on the context.


So what scales would be appropriate to play over that if it were the tonic chord?
#7
If you're just playing the notes E and A together, you're just playing an interval of a perfect 4th. Chords are made up of three or more notes so to give it a name like Esus4 is a bit of a stretch without any further context - although one could say it is an inverted A5 powerchord (again technically not a chord, but anyhow...). It really depends on how you want to use the notes (context) which will determine what that interval will function as. So yes, an E and and A together could be a Esus4 (E, G, B, A), or it could just as easily be an Fmaj7 (F, A, C, E) or a D9 (D, F#, A, C, E) or something else. So when you ask about what scales to use over it, it depends on what you want those notes to function as. So when you play those two notes, use your ear (and your guitar) to fill in the blanks that you want to hear. hope this helps somewhat.
#8
Quote by liloffshore
So what scales would be appropriate to play over that if it were the tonic chord?

If you were to chug away on that chord for a few bars, A m pentatonic works perfectly. Cuz it's essentially an A chord. Just cuz the E is in the bass doesn't mean it's a 'E' chord.
#9
Quote by mdc
If you were to chug away on that chord for a few bars, A m pentatonic works perfectly. Cuz it's essentially an A chord. Just cuz the E is in the bass doesn't mean it's a 'E' chord.


One thing I noticed when going from that chord to an A power chord it almost soumds identical.
#10
Quote by liloffshore
One thing I noticed when going from that chord to an A power chord it almost soumds identical.

Because it IS the same chord, just inverted as people have said. It has the same notes as A5 but A5 just has A as the lowest note when your chord has E as the lowest note.

What scales can you play over it? Whatever you want. Almost everything will sound good (or morel like not too bad) over just one chord. If there's just one chord and it's A5, you would maybe want to play something A based scale. A major, A minor, A minor pentatonic. Start with them. You need a context to know which scale to play. Over one chord you can play many scales, depending on the other chords. If I tell you to play A major over A5, it doesn't always work. For example if you are playing in G major, A5 functions as the ii chord. And playing A major scale over it would sound "wrong". It wouldn't really sound good.

There's no one scale that fits a chord.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#11
Quote by liloffshore
One thing I noticed when going from that chord to an A power chord it almost soumds identical.


They ARE identical. An A powerchord (I,V) is the exact same thing as an E with its fourth (I,IV), because it's fourth is A. It's more likely that it's just an inverted powerchord (V,I) than a (I,IV) harmony simply because (I, V) is a stronger harmony. It does really depend on the context though.
#12
This should be a game show.
Caution:
This post contains my opinion and/or inaccurate information


Quote by vayne92
I'm genuinely beginning to think you're the best troll of all time


"Emocore is like, when you cry when you break a guitar string"
- Thurston Moore
#13
Quote by billytalent77
They ARE identical. An A powerchord (I,V) is the exact same thing as an E with its fourth (I,IV), because it's fourth is A. It's more likely that it's just an inverted powerchord (V,I) than a (I,IV) harmony simply because (I, V) is a stronger harmony. It does really depend on the context though.

Sounds a bit like you are confusing chord functions with chord tones.

But it is true that chords with root and fifth are more usual than chords with root and fourth. The only chords with root and fourth are sus4 and 11 chords. But almost all chords have root and fifth.

If you only play E and A together, it will sound like A5. But if you for example play E and G# after the E and A, it will sound like Esus4 - E major. It's all about the context. And it also has to do with what the other instruments play.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115