#1
After years of bedroom guitarplaying/noodling around I've come to the conclusion that I'm hindered by my inability to locate specific notes on the fretboard. I took the "box" or "shape" approach and realized that this isn't sufficient for locating specific scale degrees. The first step of being aware of where all the specific degrees are is to know the notes of the neck, it will at least make the process of figuring it out easier anyway I'd say

So, any tips? How do you do it?

Edit: I hope this was the right forum
Last edited by PunchSlap at Jan 3, 2014,
#2
I would learn the Note names as well as the scale Degrees.

as for learning note names. take one note and play it everywhere on the neck and try to find them fast and faster. do one note for 5 min and then the next. etc.

for scale degrees just imagine them when you play and while you do that its extremely important to Remember the SOUND as well, most important thing.
#4
oh also for learning note names you can draw up Fretboard diagrams, copy a hundred and then fill in the note names without checking.
#5
Absorb thd sound of the notes over a harmonic backing. Hear them in context. Because when playing live you won't have time to think of note names, you will be relying on the sounds you know and studied.

Note names are important to help you navigate the fretboard, but there is no need to memorise the notes on the neck.

Sound is king. By hearing the sound you want, your fingers will fret the notes without thinking about their names.
#6
Quote by Ignore
for scale degrees just imagine them when you play and while you do that its extremely important to Remember the SOUND as well, most important thing.

That's twice you've been told now, TS.
#8
How i did it? First i learnt how a scale worked ( major and natural minor). Which notes followed which etc. Then from an open e for example i would play the notes ascending to the octave( 12th fret), and memorize them. I would do that for each string.

Then i learnt a natural minor/major scale pattern to be played vertically over all strings whilst memorizing again which note was which.

This was my method. Typing this out reminds me of how much a pain in the arse it was I'm sure there are much better ways but it bloody worked!

Good luck
#9
I figured working out the structure of the sounds and (vice versa)working out sounds of structures would be a good approach. I already have a so called "library", but I'm not 100% sure how my licks fit harmonically.

Or when presented with a certain chord during an improvisation session or any other hypothetical scenario, it could be great to have guidelines or "templates". If someone plays a chord, then you should at least know what tones are in the chord and apply this info on the neck(say, if you know how the sound of a third is and want to play it over this chord, then you should be able to find this degree on the fretboard).

Writing fret diagrams seem to be an answer, boring as shit too but I guess that's the way it is

All of the other suggestions are great as well!
Last edited by PunchSlap at Jan 3, 2014,
#10
I do it different ways.lol
That's because I already had music lesson since I was a kid and my father was also a musician.

Anyways no one taught me the fret board. However I manage to memorized all the notes
in open position.
I also manage to play/memorized the Ionian 2 octive , The highest C note
at the E string, 8th fret.
K...I hope we all know how to tune our guitars already.
So it was natural for me to know all the notes up to the 5th fret.

I also manage to play the mixolyian mode starting from A string 10th fret (2 octive)
ending at the E string 15th fret.
So it open up the fret board to me on the opposite side of open position.

This is what hung me up...No matter how much I tried to memorize it..it wouldn't retain.
K, here stuff that going to save you time or what I got stuck on until I figure it out.
It had to simple. So it would retain without me thinking. lmao
Bar your index finger at the 7th fret.
Start your count at the E note A string.
See it???? it's just like open position
Do you also see how all the patterns repeat itself over and over again?

Example.... bar your index finger at the 5th fret.
Start your count from the A note E string...
Do you see it ? it's like open position there too.lmao

After a while..when I bar my finger at wherever ..I see it as open position.lol
Depending what use as the root note...whether I count as min or minor.
When I make power chords. The C5, G5 D5...ect
I use 3 fingers. Root, 5 and Octive. So its really easy for me to see.
I can build chords or scales. Right off the bat Im seeing with in area of 5 frets.
I probably play that mixolyian and Aeolian back to back a million times.
So it's just a matter of me warping those modes to create other modes or scales.
In other words I see it as open and bar. (both)
People term it as playing lateral going toward the nut or the pickup.
Then it's just a matter of me alternative between open and bar...the neck opens
up as I go. Im basically just seeing the major pentatonic or minor pentatonic
within one octive as a sort of skeleton. That's the process that goes in head.
Then the rest are just painting whatever shades of colours.

I also see the enter neck as a whole whether in pentatonic or diatonic.
So it's just a matter of silding/shifting the entire pattern up or down like a slide
ruler to play in different keys....
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 3, 2014,
#11
Learn how to construct scales

Work them out in every position on the neck (DO NOT look them up in tab)

Then practice them with your eyes closed, continuous motion open E to 22nd fret on high e, and back down, with a metronome.

I recommend starting with quarter notes at 60bpm.
#12
Quote by mdc
Absorb thd sound of the notes over a harmonic backing. Hear them in context. Because when playing live you won't have time to think of note names, you will be relying on the sounds you know and studied.

Note names are important to help you navigate the fretboard, but there is no need to memorise the notes on the neck.

Sound is king. By hearing the sound you want, your fingers will fret the notes without thinking about their names.



This right here is probably the most important aspect that you can rely on and pay attention too. Try practicing arpeggios as well as much as possible and memorize the sounds of different chord qualities. Like knowing the difference between a Major 7 and a Dominant 7. Knowing the difference in tonal quality between a Minor 7 and a Minor 7 flat 5; even a minor Major 7.
#13
Thanks for all the replies!

Quote by smc818
I do it different ways.lol
That's because I already had music lesson since I was a kid and my father was also a musician.

Anyways no one taught me the fret board. However I manage to memorized all the notes
in open position.
I also manage to play/memorized the Ionian 2 octive , The highest C note
at the E string, 8th fret.
K...I hope we all know how to tune our guitars already.
So it was natural for me to know all the notes up to the 5th fret.

I also manage to play the mixolyian mode starting from A string 10th fret (2 octive)
ending at the E string 15th fret.
So it open up the fret board to me on the opposite side of open position.

This is what hung me up...No matter how much I tried to memorize it..it wouldn't retain.
K, here stuff that going to save you time or what I got stuck on until I figure it out.
It had to simple. So it would retain without me thinking. lmao
Bar your index finger at the 7th fret.
Start your count at the E note A string.
See it???? it's just like open position
Do you also see how all the patterns repeat itself over and over again?

Example.... bar your index finger at the 5th fret.
Start your count from the A note E string...
Do you see it ? it's like open position there too.lmao

After a while..when I bar my finger at wherever ..I see it as open position.lol
Depending what use as the root note...whether I count as min or minor.
When I make power chords. The C5, G5 D5...ect
I use 3 fingers. Root, 5 and Octive. So its really easy for me to see.
I can build chords or scales. Right off the bat Im seeing with in area of 5 frets.
I probably play that mixolyian and Aeolian back to back a million times.
So it's just a matter of me warping those modes to create other modes or scales.
In other words I see it as open and bar. (both)
People term it as playing lateral going toward the nut or the pickup.
Then it's just a matter of me alternative between open and bar...the neck opens
up as I go. Im basically just seeing the major pentatonic or minor pentatonic
within one octive as a sort of skeleton. That's the process that goes in head.
Then the rest are just painting whatever shades of colours.

I also see the enter neck as a whole whether in pentatonic or diatonic.
So it's just a matter of silding/shifting the entire pattern up or down like a slide
ruler to play in different keys....


This was very helpful, thanks!


If it interests anyone, I've had good "results(being able to memorize)" by memorizing the tones in clusters on each fret. For example, the open position is EADGBE, downwards, the 5th fret is ADGBEA(although the B is one step below the 5th fret, but for the sake of keeping the pattern and visualizing the natural tones) etc.

Being able to remember circle of fifths made the process easier too I guess.