Page 1 of 2
#1
I'm starting to learn writing and reading sheet music. Just wondering how many and how well you fellow UG's know it.
#5
I play from lead sheets and by ear. I know the fretboard, note names, and can figure out about any chord quickly. I know a lot of music theory as well. But when it comes to actually reading the dots on a music staff, I crawl. I take each dot and spend a couple seconds figuring it out, so I rarely bother. I know enough that I can follow what's going on in a theory book only.

I've actually tried to become fluent several times, but I personally didn't find it that useful. For a few classical songs that caught my ear, I rewrote them in TAB so I could go back later and play them (or bought books with them in TAB). It's probably something that is more important in certain types of music or careers. I don't really regret not learning it for how I play.
#6
i know scales, chords, notes on my fretboard, i can improvise a solo, but i'm lost in front of a music sheet. I can't read it
Last edited by _tim* at Jan 3, 2014,
#7
I can, I've been taught how to read music since I started playing guitar. I still read notes in books and such but tabs are much easier, especially since I only know 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 7th position.
#10
i can only read for piano playing, and can only sight read really simple things.
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#12
I can read bass clef with minimal effort thanks to HS jazz band. Very useful when playing different genres, not just jazz or big band charts. I should brush up on treble clef.
Gear:
Ibanez GSA60 Guitar through Zoom G1Xon to Vox VT40+
Ibanez SR300 Bass to Acoustic B100
#13
Quote by _tim*
i know scales, chords, notes on my fretboard, i can improvise a solo, but i'm lost in front of a music sheet. I can't read it


That's why I use tab which I can sight read
Gear
Jackson DK2
Ibanez RGR320EX
Guild X82 Nova
Godin Seagull S6

Vox V847
Vox VT40+ / VFS5 VT


Quote by FatalGear41

Right now, there are six and a half billion people on earth who don't care what kind of tubes you have in your amplifier
#14
I'd be a pretty crap teacher if I couldn't. I started playing wind instruments as child before I learned guitar as a teenager, so reading music is second nature to me.

However, for guitar, I actually prefer to read and write in TAB. It not only tells you what the notes are, but the best position for playing those notes. I like that.

DON'T MAKE ME DESTROY YOU!


___________________________________________________


TURN OFF YOUR MIND RELAX AND FLOAT DOWNSTREAM

Quote by Scumbag1792
My God, this must be the smartest/greatest guy ever.
#15
My instrument was the violin back when I was 9. Since I played it up until I graduated high school back in June, I was kind of required to read sheet music (treble clef, more specifically).

As to reading while I play guitar (5 1/2 years), I can sight read and what not. It's something that I don't do often. I usually use my ear (always improving) or the rare tabs. And as a side note, I do know the notes on the fretboard, adequate amount of theory, and can improvise.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#16
I still have the occasional fuck up with tenor clef, but other than that, I can read it quite fluently.


Looking back on this, I realized that I can transpose in my head pretty quickly now in the midst of playing and it's nearly instantaneous on paper. I feel really accomplished about it.
Join the 7 String Legion!

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.

Messiaen is Magical


Official Approval
This message has been approved by:

Mister A.J.
Head of the Department of Redundancy Department
Mister A.J.
Last edited by Mister A.J. at Jan 9, 2014,
#17
I play bari sax, so that's most of my sheet music experience. I have some experience with bass clef too, as all my bass parts were written as sheet music back in marching band.

For guitar I can read sheet music pretty well, I just need to sit down and figure it out for a while. Sometimes I have to tab a section if it's particularly complicated, but I try to avoid that.
#19
I read, but I'm not very good at sight reading. Charts I can do on sight generally, just not notation.

Quote by Willowthewitch
That's why I use tab which I can sight read

Notation is a lot easier to read than tabs because it contains so much more information. You need to know a lot more than finger position to play music accurately. Tabs don't have any precise way to indicate rhythm, have limited information on dynamics and articulation... most of all, they obscure the relationships between the notes.
#20
Quote by -xCaMRocKx-
However, for guitar, I actually prefer to read and write in TAB. It not only tells you what the notes are, but the best position for playing those notes. I like that.


Position indications are standard for guitar notation. Look at any piece of classical guitar music, the index finger or barre position is indicated by the roman numerals above the staff.
#22
I have never really read music for guitar but I do know where all the notes are (so I think I could read music for guitar too, but not sight read). I leaned to read music because I also play the trumpet and I'm decent at sight reading.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#23
Quote by -xCaMRocKx-
I'd be a pretty crap teacher if I couldn't. I started playing wind instruments as child before I learned guitar as a teenager, so reading music is second nature to me.

However, for guitar, I actually prefer to read and write in TAB. It not only tells you what the notes are, but the best position for playing those notes. I like that.


Usually notation not only indicates position, it even indicates exactly which finger.
#24
If you're a good player you shouldn't need to be told what position to play a group of notes in anyway unless the composer had a specific timbral quality in mind when writing the passage.
.
#25
I can read. I played the sax as a kids from first grade.

It's kind of hard to read guitar solo on sheet music when people try to cram 32 notes
into a bar.lol Plus you'll just have squeekly lines and all kinds of weird stuff to help
identify how a note is being played..Hard, soft, slide, legato, bends, hamner on...ect.lol

I have a hard enough time at it is trying understand certain tabs.
I know theyre not correct because I can tell by the tone of the string being played
on the original recording...stuff like that.
It dost really bother me...at lest I know what to notes are.
Sometimes it's just easier for me to transpose it to whatever that's comfortable for me.

There's just certain things I cant do on a guitar.
I damaged my fret board hand. It used to go numb after 10 mins of playing.
It's barely starting to heal

Sometime it's helpful if the tabs tell you what chords. Especially in acoustic type picking, backing tracks or rhythm.

I only refer to it when there's to much notes or noise.
Most of the time I learn by ear. But it's still helpful to know music theory.
#26
Quote by vIsIbleNoIsE
i can only read for piano playing, and can only sight read really simple things.


+1 (well, drums too i suppose)
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#27
I can read, kind of, I'm not fast and fluent but can work it out. I am getting more familiar with it because I'm reading music more often now than I did when I started, but it's not everyday or anything so progress is slow.

I've transcribed some songs out by ear and written out the whole thing in standard notation with a pencil and paper taking my time to get it perfect. It took me ages to do a single song but was a worthwhile exercise.
Si
#28
Not really. When I was younger playing piano/recorder I could read, however shifting to guitar basically meant that I didn't have to anymore. I've now been active on the music scene for about 10 years and can only remember two or three times where I was handed sheet music. In those situations I just learnt the songs by ear. Amusingly enough one was some formal auditorium sit down and watch us thing, and the entire rest of the band were reading music off their stands during the 2 hour performance whilst I was bobbing around the stage with my wireless rig. People commented afterwards that I was the only person who looked like they were having fun.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#29
Quote by 20Tigers
I can read, kind of, I'm not fast and fluent but can work it out.


Yeah that's kind of like me.

I'm kind of weird, though- I'd be lost if someone handed me sheet music for guitar, but at the same time I'm kind of lost if someone hands me tab with no proper music notation alongside it either. I sort of use both tab and music notation, if that makes sense. I use the (proper) notation for the rhythm, bar lines etc. (I think that comes from when I played drums, it really helped my rhythm reading) and tab for the notes. Even though I'm pretty much using my ears for the rhythm when I'm learning a song (by listening to the original track on CD or youtube), I find it much easier if I have the proper notation as well as tab.

I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#30
I studied at this place http://www.army.mod.uk/music/23271.aspx.
having played through Beatlemania I decided to join the British army in 1966 to learn to shoot people.
On joining my regiment they found out that I'd played Bass guitar on the UK beat scene so I was invited to join the regimental band which was a 24/7 job.
I was asked to get a beat group (that's what they called them back then) going with all instruments and gear provided.
I was assigned into the Sax section for the military band. I knew virtually nothing about music/theory but in 9 months after joining I passed to enter Knellar Hall (Royal Military School of Music) which was a very strict regime (none stop music 8am to 4pm 5 days PW).
After that I was able to play bass in all forms of guitar bands, Jazz bands, Big dance orchestras, resident musician etc, so yes I went from guessing to knowing.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#31
I can play the rythm but not the actual melody in the sheets
Quote by KingDime666
It's dubstep minor in E.


Quote by steve_muse
I bet I'm gunna love Revolt #plottwist
#32
I can read. If you give me the sheet an hour or so before you need it played I can be ready to work. If you give it to me the day before I'll have it memorized, reharmonized, improved and personalized. Butl, if you throw it in front of me and ask me to play it live with a band at first sight I will curse you and mumble something about snuffing out my creativity.
#33
Quote by John Swift
I studied at this place http://www.army.mod.uk/music/23271.aspx.
having played through Beatlemania I decided to join the British army in 1966 to learn to shoot people.
On joining my regiment they found out that I'd played Bass guitar on the UK beat scene so I was invited to join the regimental band which was a 24/7 job.
I was asked to get a beat group (that's what they called them back then) going with all instruments and gear provided.
I was assigned into the Sax section for the military band. I knew virtually nothing about music/theory but in 9 months after joining I passed to enter Knellar Hall (Royal Military School of Music) which was a very strict regime (none stop music 8am to 4pm 5 days PW).
After that I was able to play bass in all forms of guitar bands, Jazz bands, Big dance orchestras, resident musician etc, so yes I went from guessing to knowing.

You ever need to use those shooting skills?
#35
I do for piano, winds and bass. It's too much of a pain in the ass for guitar to plot out chord voicings, so I just use TABS there.
Are You a PROG-HEAD? I am.


Fender Geddy Lee Jazz
Degitech BP-80
MXR El Grande Bass Fuzz
Boss Bass Chorus CEB-3
DOD FX91 OD
Traynor Dynabass 200
#36
I'm not the quickest at it, but I regularly write in notation. I find it hard to read where the note is, but all the symbols are clear as day to me. I bet if I stopped reading tab for a while, I'd probably be as good as someone in a symphony. I admit this site made me stop reading notation for a while!
Q: Favourite Pink Floyd song?
A: The one where they get wicked high and play Emin and A for an hour.
#37
Kind of. I have 11 years of experience on the Alto Saxophone and its sheet music, but when it comes to guitar I'm not able to read it that well. Tried it a few times when first starting out and a friend had me practicing some Bach chorales, but I just felt overwhelmed trying to read more than one melody at once and had no clue what position to play the notes (though I'm sure the latter is a moot point on actual guitar tablature, we were just using a piano book). So I prefer tabs (specifically GuitarPro/PowerTab/etc. tabs, having the fingerings and the rhythm notation is the best of both worlds for me).
#38
I don't think I read any Tabs for about 3 or 4 years now. I either learn by ear or through notation. Although my sight reading has gotten mediocre because I haven't been in situations where I've required it lately.
#39
if you know all your keys and positions..it is much easier..doing studio work was a challange..given a lead sheet and then last second changes penciled in..or a key change and you have to transpose in your head..or a charlie parker/coltrane flavored run in C#..

learn notation..tabs are like: going to library..but you can only look at the pictures

play well

wolf
#40
i can read fluently for voice and trumpet, and okay for piano and guitar. I never really have to for guitar because I just play jazz charts.
Page 1 of 2