#1
Hi, it's Ronald Poe again and I have yet another question. How do you use motifs? I know what they are but how do you apply them. I'm trying to learn improvisation and soloing and know that this is important. I also know a few scales. I like Heavy metal but am open to suggestions on Jazz, Blues, funk (bass or guitar), and rock.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#2
Step one - Think of a motif. Rhythmic, melodic, both, doesn't matter.
Step two - Use it as an idea to build a solo around.

Congratulations, you can now use motifs.

Slightly more seriously: it's not a complicated idea; motifs are used to give a solo a through line in terms of sound, something for the listener to grab on to. So really the idea is that you have your motif and you repeat it when you think the solo needs to be brought back on track. It's also important to note, though, that a motif doesn't have to be a whole musical phrase, it can be a rhythm, a movement in terms of harmony, a melody line, almost anything that you can recognise.

If you listen to the last song on my band's album (link in the signature) 'Atrophy', there's a solo in it where I repeat a motif once the follows something the vocals do later, but it's not a direct copy and paste of the same part. It's rhythmically the same and somewhat the same in terms of movement but it's very definitely not the same exact notes. That's the vague idea, you give your listener something familiar to hear so they know it's the same piece of music basically.

Also: you signature is wrong. The character is "Crash", not "Clash"; the band name is from an old NES game with the same title: Crash And The Boys.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Jan 4, 2014,
#3
Its that Easy? Thanks for both the answer and correcting my quote (I fixed it). I really appreciate it. Do you know how to mix a motif with scales and arpeggios.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#4
The rhythm is the most important part of a motif-driven melodic idea.

Try coming up with a little motif just with the guitar, and repeat it a few times to get it in your head. Then, start varying the notes while keeping the rhythm the same.