#1
I am kind of confused about why I dont seem to like the feel of many expensive guitars. I currently own a Schecter Damien Elite solo and Epiphone Goth explorer. I really enjoy playing both, and they necks feel great in my hand. And IMO they both seem very well put together(specifically the neck & fretboard)....there are no gaps or seems between the two, everything is smooth, etc.

That being said I currently have about $1200 specifically designated for a new toy, so I went down to guitar center to try out some Gibson Les Paul studio and traditionals, PRS(lower models, cant remember names), and a few others. I really was planning to get a Les Paul, I basically told myself thats what i wanted, but once it was in my hands I was very disappointed. I tried the 50 and 60's neck and both felt kinda awkward, although im fairly certain the 60's neck is similar to my goth explorer. In addition the fret boards looked cheaper to my eye and their construction, specifically the way its attached to the neck looked sloppier.....and this was on several that I tried, not just one. I also found that most of the higher end guitars have a laminate finish on the back side of the neck which I really didnt like the feel of, almost felt sticky when you go up and down the neck. Does this come off some with playing?

I guess im just thrown off and wondering if I am missing something? I'll be the first to admit I'm fairly new to guitars and not a great player, but I was really expecting a huge upgrade in quality and look or double the price of my current guitars.

FWIW, none of my disappointment comes from sound quality because I didn't even plug in most of the Les Pauls because I didnt see the point. Figured if it didnt look or feel good to me then its sound was not really important.

Any comments are welcome, even the ones that think im crazy. HAHA
Last edited by TxRhino at Jan 4, 2014,
#2
Any company can make a gem or a lemon. However, Gibson has been getting a reputation the past few years of not having the best QC.

And regardless, what feels good is entirely subjective. Just because a guitar costs 5x one of your own doesn't mean it will feel (or sound) better to you. No knock on Gibson or Fender, but despite their iconic status, I have yet to find one of their guitars that I actually enjoyed the feel of playing.

Keep looking around, and don't be afraid to buy what YOU like, not what someone says you should like. Shop with your hands and ears, not with your eyes on the brand name.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jan 4, 2014,
#3
Put simply a $1200 guitar isn't made up of $1200 worth of materials.

Also if you don't like the stuff you played it'll never feel good. Good steak tastes bad if you hate steak.
#4
What you guys said is pretty what I thought. Im not really in a rush to get a new guitar so I will expand my shopping radius and go visit a few new stores.
#5
perhaps a LP just isn't you. necks on guitars vary widely and you have to find ones that suite you. Schecter makes higher end guitars so try one of those. also you may not care for nitro finishes which the Gibby's have they do feel different. try guitars until you find one that feels good and sounds good no need to let the $ burn a hole in your pocket.
#6
My favorite 6 string guitar neck of all time is on a very old model Jackson Dinky Reverse; they float around on eBay from time to time for around $400. Preference over price, the cost won't tell you how good the quality is or how much you'll enjoy it.
#7
The world starts looking different when you start making buying decisions based on merit rather than reputation or price tag.
#8
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Any company can make a gem or a lemon. However, Gibson has been getting a reputation the past few years of not having the best QC.


Very True Statement. I own a Gibson Les Paul, Traditional Pro, and I'll tell you that you're definitely going about buying your new guitar the right way. In my opinion anyone that buys a $2,000.00 guitar from looking at a picture on a website is playing Russian Roulette with his money. I played 22 different guitars in 3 separate stores over about 3 weeks before I found "My" guitar. I inspected, played, re inspected, tweaked, tuned, detuned, tuned again, then once I found one that met my qualifications, I asked the sales guy if the tech could take a look at it. In my case, the tech, after answering all my questions, asked me what strings I used, replaced them for me, and set the action and pickups to my liking, then turned me loose on an amp, where I put it through it's paces again.

If you take your "test drive" seriously, and don't compromise on things that are important to you, you'll find your guitar...

AND, it might not be the one you had your sights set on, so play em all... might surprise yourself...

As always... JMHO
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#9
I played 20+ Gibson LP Studios before I found mine and that was back in 2001. But Gibson does more hand finishing on their production guitars that any other company I can think of so there are slight variations in all of them
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
Last edited by Robbgnarly at Jan 4, 2014,
#10
Quote by Papabear505
Very True Statement. I own a Gibson Les Paul, Traditional Pro, and I'll tell you that you're definitely going about buying your new guitar the right way. In my opinion anyone that buys a $2,000.00 guitar from looking at a picture on a website is playing Russian Roulette with his money. I played 22 different guitars in 3 separate stores over about 3 weeks before I found "My" guitar. I inspected, played, re inspected, tweaked, tuned, detuned, tuned again, then once I found one that met my qualifications, I asked the sales guy if the tech could take a look at it. In my case, the tech, after answering all my questions, asked me what strings I used, replaced them for me, and set the action and pickups to my liking, then turned me loose on an amp, where I put it through it's paces again.

If you take your "test drive" seriously, and don't compromise on things that are important to you, you'll find your guitar...

AND, it might not be the one you had your sights set on, so play em all... might surprise yourself...

As always... JMHO

think this is true for any guitar maker. for whatever reason despite cnc etc necks can be just a little different. I'm a Strat guy and try different ones all the time. some times that Custom Shop neck is great others kinda meh but the MIM one I play is perfect. guitars are an individual thing so trying them out before buying is essential to me.
#11
I've played a few different variations of Epiphone Les Paul Standards and most of their necks don't feel as good as mine does. It's the same thing with Gibsons, Fenders, Ibanez, etc. You can play countless American Strats and each one will feel slightly different to another one.

Every company will have guitars that are gems and ones that are busts. Also, just because the price on a guitar is $2500, it doesn't mean that it'll be 5x better than a similar guitar that only costs $500.

to the TS, I agree with you on the Epiphone Gothic Explorer. I owned one for two years before selling in towards the end of 2012 to fund for mt Marshall. The neck on it was superb and I actually liked the stock pickups. Everything about it was fantastic. It's a shame that I sold.

Quote by ChucklesMginty
I've tried quite a few Les Paul Studios and they really suck IMO... I'm not a complete Gibson hater but there's just no point getting one with other options in the same price bracket. It varies from guitar to guitar, but I've literally played LP copies half the price that were nicer.


I played a few Studios and the majority of them didn't impress me. The ones that did felt great though.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#12
Don't be afraid to consider guitars you can't try in store as long as there is a good return policy.

I say that because there really are a lot more good companies out there, and even in major cities (I live in the Dallas/Ft Worth metroplex*) you're not going to see them all...or even a high percentage of them.

Hell, some good products are available almost exclusively via some form of mail-order, like guitars from Carvin or US Masters.

In my opinion anyone that buys a $2,000.00 guitar from looking at a picture on a website is playing Russian Roulette with his money.


Which is one of the reasons I always check return policies. Like I said, I live in "the big city", but despite that, I rarely find what I want locally. So most of my collection has been accumulated via phone and online transactions.

So far, I've only returned one- a used acoustic with a suspicious crease that could have been a crack- no problems.


* when I decided to buy my first electric guitar, what I ultimately decided I wanted was not easily found here. So I had my music store order what I wanted, and had it delivered to their store. They inspected it & set it up...and now, they're one of the leading sellers of that brand in the region.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jan 4, 2014,
#13
TS - the 60's neck should be closer to your explorer so focus on trying those. not everyone digs a LP so it's a matter of taste. good luck.

Quote by Papabear505
In my opinion anyone that buys a guitar from looking at a picture on a website is playing Russian Roulette with his money.

not really. i mean it's always best to play before you pay but it's not always possible.

what if you want a guitar they don't even sell in the country you live in?
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#14
Guitars are overvalued by the guitar manufacturers. This is evident by the fact that most of them drop half their value as soon as they're taken off the shop floor. Les Paul's are overpriced for what you're getting, the only reason to get an LP is because you want an LP. If you just want a good playing instrument then don't buy an LP because you're paying for the name not the instrument.
#15
Quote by kingking22
Guitars are overvalued by the guitar manufacturers.


If you look at the MSRP only, pretty much yes.

This is evident by the fact that most of them drop half their value as soon as they're taken off the shop floor.

No- that is indicative of very little. That will happen to almost every manufactured good once it becomes "used" unless & until demand far outstrips supply.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#16
I play a LTD MH-400 with EMG's and a FR. It is an amazing guitar. Had some extra money so I picked up a Gibson Studio, and really liked it. Sounds Great, but it is much different from ltd in about every way.

I do not say it was a mistake, but I am starting to lean back to the ltd. it just took two years to decide it did not have the "feel". I will keep it, it sounds and plays really good, but I will not buy another Les Paul. A couple of Jackson's have caught my eye.......

Have fun testing different styles of guitars, good luck!
Last edited by Chevywizz at Jan 4, 2014,