#1
There are tons that point to a note and say "what is it??" but I'm looking for something that will really help me read sheet music. The basic idea is like guitar hero but where the notes are on a staff.

IDEA #1
staff notes scroll by and you have to keep up by selecting the appropriate note on a fretboard within a range of frets (so you're selecting the notes you'd actually play, not just choosing the same G# over and over since you don't know where others are.) I think having it gamified like this would help keep attention and increase learning.


IDEA #2
staff notes scroll by, and you have to play them on your actual guitar. A mic picks it up and determines if you were right. There's an honors system of playing within the right box of frets.
#4
None that would be very effective. Reading music is about interpretation, not just locating the notes. Takes patience.

If you spend 15 minutes a day with it you'll see progress.
#5
There is an app for Android phones (likely Iphone as well) where it shows you the staff and notes scroll past and you have to hit the right note on a little keyboard at the bottom. You can adjust the speed and a few other settings. It pretty much worked like Guitar Hero.
I can't remember it's name (I broke my phone a few months back, I'm still using an old one from about 2008 now because I'm a cheap ass) but I'm sure if you have an Android and searched for 'guitar' or 'music' related apps it you would find it pretty easily since that's how I found it. It was something like 'sheetmusic lite' if I remember correctly.

I've never used it but I imagine Rocksmith for PS3/360/PC would have some kind of system for this. It's something I would expect it to have anyway. You should have a look into that.
When I was eleven I broke the patio window and my mother sued me... She's always been a very aggressive litigator.
#8
I wrote a little program for this a few years back, it had a full interactive fretboard and would reveal which position was which note whenever you clicked a certain position, or would reveal all notes at whatever position (say you chose 'E' it would highlight all positions where you could find an E)

It also had a testing mode, nothing scrolling like guitar hero, but it would highlight a note position and you had to tell the computer what note that would be, or the other way round, it would give you a note and ask you to chose a place on the fretboard where you could find the note, I was working on a mode that disallowed you from choosing the same note position more than once.

Not a very helpful reply, sadly I ditched the project and programming in general, and I fear the entire thing went with my last couple of hard drive failures, but would anyone have considered such a program useful?
#9
Design it and then sell it for 5 dollars a pop. I'm sure you'd make at least 10 grand.
#10
Ok, I've just called in work and quit. Anyone wanna re-teach me programming?

No one steal my ideas, ok?
#12
There's an app called "Play By Ear". I can definitely recommend that.
Last edited by dogmax at Jan 9, 2014,
#13
Rocksmith doesn't have anything like this at all, It's all tab style. The entire thing is VERY lax when it comes to theory. I think it may do a little in "Session" mode, but nothing much.

Only thing I can thing of is flashcards (Find all the "e"s on the 3rd string, or What is the note on the 17th fret 1st string?) but not any games. Sorry!
#14
Roll a die. 1 is high e 6 is low E. whatever you get is your string. Then have all the notes written on 12 cards, and pull the top one. Whatever note it is, you need to find all those notes on hat string.
#15
Quote by macashmack
Roll a die. 1 is high e 6 is low E. whatever you get is your string. Then have all the notes written on 12 cards, and pull the top one. Whatever note it is, you need to find all those notes on hat string.



I like this idea, this is probably the best way to do it in real life, the approach makes best sense
#16
If your learning to read sheet music, then sheet music is the best way to go, of course when you're starting its stuff like the national anthem and whatnot, and you would just learn to play each piece in different positions on the fretboard, I got bored after 2 or 3 But the fact is theres not much sheet music for guitar anyway that i know about, so you may want to buy a piano if that whats you really after.

If you're goal is to learn the notes on the fretboard, the low 3 strings should be easy anyway, because the bar chords are on them... the 6th and 5th strings you should know very quickly if you play any pop songs, as for the D string, well youll need to learn some more barre chords, then all you have to really work on memorizing are the high 3 strings.

You could just run through scales as you recite the names, Thats how most people do it I imagine. It helps your fingers, you can watch tv while you do it almost. Its the kind of lessonplan a lazy guitarist loves.


But if your learning to play sheetmusic, your going to have a tough time of it on guitar probably. I hear clarinet, is basically the same register as guitar though. So you could look for some easy guitar sheetmusic learn it in 3 or 4 positions, and then get some clarinet music, etc etc. Its pretty easy stuff to do if you want to dedicate the time, though i feel like it may be a waste if your never actually going to play any sheetmusic.
#18
Quote by flashbandit
There are tons that point to a note and say "what is it??" but I'm looking for something that will really help me read sheet music. The basic idea is like guitar hero but where the notes are on a staff.

IDEA #1
staff notes scroll by and you have to keep up by selecting the appropriate note on a fretboard within a range of frets (so you're selecting the notes you'd actually play, not just choosing the same G# over and over since you don't know where others are.) I think having it gamified like this would help keep attention and increase learning.


IDEA #2
staff notes scroll by, and you have to play them on your actual guitar. A mic picks it up and determines if you were right. There's an honors system of playing within the right box of frets.


use the Brain app in your head.

get books with standard notation / sheet music. Read/play on a regular basis

it works! no updates necessary.