#1
Hi!

I'm mainly an electric guitar player (rock, fusion, metal, etc.) but since I heard this guy I started playing my acoustic more often. I would like to know how to play like him, what scales he uses, how to improvise and compose this way. I know he uses open C tuning but is it really necessary to play like him? Also, what kind of music would you say this is..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdYJf_ybyVo
#2
What scales he uses?

- It doesn't matter because scales don't make you sound like somebody. And he uses the major scale all the time.

How to improvise and compose this way?

- Train your ears and try to hear this kind of melodies in your head. Know your fretboard well. You can play similar stuff in whatever tuning but it won't sound exactly like this because he uses the open strings. But the notes are the same in every tuning so it doesn't really matter. You could play the same melodies as him but just not all the open string stuff as he does.

What kind of music is this?

- I would say folk-ish instrumental pop music.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#3
I think his legato technique would be the real challenge there.

Other than the technique, the song is really pretty simple, he probably probably came up with a lot of it just noodling around.
#4
Yeah good left hand legato technique (slides, hammers, pull offs etc)

Really good rhythm chops and the ability to play syncopated rhythms.

Excellent fingerpicking skills and some long ass nails to use as fingerpicks.

Basically just get up in the morning grab your acoustic guitar and go out on the street and play ALLL day long. Stop playing at bed time, sleep then get up and do the same thing the next day and everyday for the next five to ten years.

And yes open tuning does lend itself well to this kind of playing.
Si
#5
To play like him you need to get a gym membership at your local centre. Its about £45 a month where I'm at. Also buy a tank top (several, preferably black).

Also get good at hammering on from nowhere,


and playing 6th intervals.

Oh, and buy a 12th string.
#6
If you have to ask "what scale is this guy using" when it's quite obvious that he's just using the major scale, it's time to go back to the drawing board TS. Time to learn major and minor scales.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
Quote by SR7s
Hi!

I'm mainly an electric guitar player (rock, fusion, metal, etc.) but since I heard this guy I started playing my acoustic more often. I would like to know how to play like him, what scales he uses, how to improvise and compose this way. I know he uses open C tuning but is it really necessary to play like him? Also, what kind of music would you say this is..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdYJf_ybyVo



Learn to play his music. Nothing else will get you there.

If it's to difficult, learn easier stuff. Come back to this guy when you're ready.
#8
Thanks a lot for the replies, I'm starting to understand his style, he seems to be one of those guys who can play really simple stuff but make it sound complicated

Quote by AlanHB
If you have to ask "what scale is this guy using" when it's quite obvious that he's just using the major scale, it's time to go back to the drawing board TS. Time to learn major and minor scales.


I meant to ask about the scales he plays more often. I just found out about this guy but maybe someone on UG already studied his style
#10
A lot if that stuff is just one motor skill. Muscle memory. Once you got it, it carries a long way. Need to brush up on your harmony and theory first though.
#13
Quote by mdc
Oh, and buy a 12th string.

Count again man. It's not a 12 string.
Si
#14
Quote by SR7s
I meant to ask about the scales he plays more often. I just found out about this guy but maybe someone on UG already studied his style


John Butler is massive in Australia. I'm pretty familiar with his stuff.

He uses these scales;

- major
- minor
- blues

Hope that helps.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#15
Quote by 20Tigers

Basically just get up in the morning grab your acoustic guitar and go out on the street and play ALLL day long. Stop playing at bed time, sleep then get up and do the same thing the next day and everyday for the next five to ten years.


A common misconception and bad advice which probably will make you worse.
However, regular and very short learning/practice sessions are much better. If you pick up your guitar 12 times a day and learn/practice for 5 minutes each go I'd say that's more optimal.

Having a teacher or friend observe you play every so often can help because they can give you a second opinion/different perspective, because some find it difficult to analyse.

As far as the music goes its just noodling around a drone string. Listen to folk fiddle, folk banjo and even flatpicking guitar to get an idea of the style. Jigs, Reels and Hornpipes, etc.
#16
I would say about learning to play like this guy:

First, you've got to learn fingerstyle. Mark Hanson's books "The Art of Contemporary Travis Picking" and "The Art of Contemporary Fingerstyle" are a great place to start. Obviously, they're nowhere near this complicated, but you're not going to play like this after a week or a month or even a year. He's quite virtuosic.

Second, yes, I you're going to spend a lot of times in alternate tunings to play like this. You can hear it in the droney-effects he uses. While, yes, there is plenty of great fingerstyle stuff that can be played in standard tuning, you're going to have to get over your fear of alternate tunings if you really want to play this way. Sometimes it's as simple as drop-D, but eventually you'll gravitate towards tunings that work for you. Doug Young's "Understanding DADGAD" is a great first book on an open tuning, and DADGAD is a good first other tuning to play with because the middle strings make it easier to leverage your knowledge of standard tuning.

A lot of this sounds like it evolved from the 60s and 70s British folk scene style playing, so you might want to go to the source for stuff that's a little easier to get started with (but by no means "easy"). eg, Davy Graham, early John Martyn, Bert Jansch (a lot of Jimmy Page's acoustic stuff is straight ripped from Graham and Jansch - it's shocking to hear). But there are parts of this which definitely remind me of, say, "Seven Black Roses" by John Martyn.

Thanks for sharing this, by the way. I was unaware of this guy and I like his stuff.