#1
I thought this was interesting.

Over the course of a two week period, they gave a control group of men a daily dosage of valproic acid tablets, and they had them do daily "perfect pitch training" online.
After the two week period, all the men had perfect pitch.

http://www.kqed.org/news/story/2014/01/04/132078/want_perfect_pitch_you_could_pop_a_pill_for_that?source=npr&category=science

I think this is really interesting. I think I have a pretty good ear but we can all agree that absolute pitch is the pinnacle of ear abilities.

Now I just need to get some valproic acid pills
#4
It sounds like nonsense to me. Sloppy statistics or some sort of rigged game. One group who was too tired to pay attention, and another group who was stoned and singing along or something.

In any event, the entire assumption is that the drug induces some sort of childhood mood in your brain. Still I think there are many children who listen to music, or even study it for large portions of their life before the age of 7 and dont acquire perfect pitch, so the results are suspect at best, especially when you consider it was done over 2 weeks which is strange, curious to see how many hours were spent in that period.
#7
Hmm it's a pretty interesting topic and I've been thinking about it. But how can one have this "perfect pitch" without any practice? I mean how the hell are you going to know a certain pitch is a C unless you've taught yourself that this pitch is indeed called C?

I don't understand what's so special about it. It's basically having memorized pitches. I just sang a C - G interval and then tested it on my piano. It was spot on. Does this now mean that I have perfect pitch? LOL. Probably not.
#8
Quote by Elintasokas
Hmm it's a pretty interesting topic and I've been thinking about it. But how can one have this "perfect pitch" without any practice? I mean how the hell are you going to know a certain pitch is a C unless you've taught yourself that this pitch is indeed called C?

because the nomenclature doesn't matter

even if you have no label for it, you're still able to identify and reproduce a particular pitch. you may have taught yourself that "unknown pitch x is called a c", but that has no bearing on your ability, prior to that, to recognize it as unknown pitch x
#9
Quote by :-D
because the nomenclature doesn't matter

even if you have no label for it, you're still able to identify and reproduce a particular pitch. you may have taught yourself that "unknown pitch x is called a c", but that has no bearing on your ability, prior to that, to recognize it as unknown pitch x

Yeah, makes sense. So, I guess having this "perfect pitch" just means having a better ability to memorize pitches.
#10
i've actually never looked into it much, but i'd imagine it's something along those lines

i didn't get into music at all until high school, so the only thing i really noticed was that i'd remember stuff from the radio or whatever and if i played it in my head, so to speak, it would sound the same as the recorded version

this obviously meant i remembered it in the same key, but i had absolutely no idea what that was at the time
#11
Quote by :-D
i've actually never looked into it much, but i'd imagine it's something along those lines

i didn't get into music at all until high school, so the only thing i really noticed was that i'd remember stuff from the radio or whatever and if i played it in my head, so to speak, it would sound the same as the recorded version

this obviously meant i remembered it in the same key, but i had absolutely no idea what that was at the time

Yeah, same here. I've never really paid any attention to memorizing exact pitches. I've always just focused on relative pitch.

I sing a C major scale everytime with perfect accuracy, though. I just tried tuning my old VERY out of tune acoustic guitar and I could do it without any reference notes. I tuned it and then checked it with my keyboard and it was in perfect tune. The only reference I had was the memorized C major scale in my head. Does this mean I have perfect pitch? lol. Still probably not.

I also tried playing a bunch of random keys on my piano without looking and I could name them everytime.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Jan 5, 2014,
#12
The article is bogus and misinterprets the study. There are two groups, placebo and pill taking group. The pill taking group does a bit better (statistically significant) on the absolute pitch tests. The statistical significance isn't very much and the number is arbitrary. The thing is that the pill taking group doesn't acquire perfect pitch, the results of the study say that the pill taking group scores a bit better. I bet you'd probably get the same statistical significance with a control group and adderall group.
#13
^ Interesting. I'm always wary of newspaper/popular magazine reporting of scientific findings because, as you said, they're often misinterpreted or "sexed up" to sell more copies.

Quote by macashmack
Even if it's half as exciting as it sounds it's still super exciting




any side effects? (from the valproic acid, not from having perfect pitch, obviously )

The language thing would be arguably even more exciting than the perfect pitch thing. I mean you can play music perfectly acceptably without perfect pitch.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Jan 5, 2014,
#14
There's no way I'm going to take pills to learn something.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115