#1
I've searched into this a lot, but for some reason I can't find the precise answer I'm looking for. Isn't that always the story, though? Clicking that post new thread button is just so tantalizing!

I'm buying a new guitar in the $400-$500 price range soon, so naturally I'm staying away from cheap Floyd's like the bubonic plague. Keeping the guitar in tune is a priority, especially since I'm a more advanced but extremely budgeted player. I've always preferred hard tail guitars, tremolo bars were never my thing. However, the MIM strats/jazz masters look extremely appealing.

My issue is I don't quite understand how the bar affects tuning. From what I've read is that it's more stable than a Floyd, but that's about it. GC employees are no help whatsoever either, as enthusiastic as they are, I get the feeling they simply don't know.

Do non-floyd tremolo bar'd guitars stay in tune like a hard tail?


Thanks so much guys, seriously.

Too long, didn't read:

Well, rude.
#2
it doesnt matter who makes it- Floyd Rose, Kahler, Wilkinson, etc.- a cheap trem is a cheap trem is a cheap trem. It will have some kind of compromise that will limit its value.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#3
Tremolos are more stable than Floyd's since they only move in one direction, which is forward. I find they maintain the tuning of the guitar pretty well. I have an old Arbor Explorer with a Fender style trem that I basically locked up with 5 springs to make it essentially immobile and it stays in tune. The usage of the tremolo will affect the tuning the most, the less you use it, the better it will stay in tune. Hope that answers your question.
#4
So, putting in more springs helps it stay in tune? I'm guessing this adds to the pressure required to move the bridge?

I should have added I wouldn't even use the trem bar, I'd probably take it off.
#5
There should be no issues with tuning stability if the whammy is not being used and the bridge stays fixed in one position as a result.

Even if you do use it, normal use should not throw the guitar out of tune so long as everything is set up correctly. By normal I mean not doing divebomb after divebomb.
#6
Quote by johnturner9

I'm buying a new guitar in the $400-$500 price range soon, so naturally I'm staying away from cheap Floyd's like the bubonic plague. Keeping the guitar in tune is a priority, especially since I'm a more advanced but extremely budgeted player.

Do non-floyd tremolo bar'd guitars stay in tune like a hard tail?

.


1.) Some hard tails don't stay in tune as well as a Floyd.
2.) The ability of a non-locked trem to stay in tune depends largely on the nut and the string trees (if any) at the other end.
3.) You probably don't need to stay away from cheap Floyds like the bubonic plague.

My experience with both cheap and expensive Floyds over the last lotta years has been that if you're buying in the $500 range, that Floyd will last a very long time and operate as well as any expensive Floyd (Gotoh, Schaller).

Two things have occasioned this.

One is that most OEM "Original" Floyd Rose trems (the ones that went into Gibsons, Fenders, etc.) were built on one of two production lines in Korea. They were built on production lines that were already producing identical (except for the "original floyd rose" stamping) licensed Floyd Rose trems that were going in cheaper guitars. Same trem, vastly different pricing.

Two is that the "license" thing is no longer part of the price of a cheaper Floyd Rose trem; with the patent up, there IS no license requirement and manufacturers no longer pay Floyd Rose. Hence the bottom line is that you can get a better Floyd Rose trem for less money.

A double locking trem will generally (put an asterisk there) keep a guitar better in tune than a non-locker or a hard tail. Yes, than a hard tail. And it'll last a very long time (I have a cheapo in a '92 Samick that has been worked all its life, and with a very tiny amount of maintenance, it's been golden).