#1
I was watching this video on youtube and I was wondering if this is a good method to record guitar on the pc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrJr6oGjFuc

I have an Orange CR120C it's a 120 watt solid state amp that has 2 output jacks for speakers. Now could I use the above method and output one of the speaker lines to a headphone converter and then to my pc? or would that fry my amp or something?

And also, in everyones opinion, what is the best way to record guitar on the comp that is cost efficient?
#2
Quote by Zero111311
I was watching this video on youtube and I was wondering if this is a good method to record guitar on the pc


i have used methods like that before. generally i'll just plug the guitar directly into the computer and use software amp simulators rather than plugging the guitar into an amp and then the amp into the computer. but both ways will work

this is not considered to be an overly optimal way of doing things. i believe you can get adequate results with such methods but most advice will tell you to bypass the computer's native soundcard by using a USB or firewire interface of some type.

i use a presonus firewire interface, it allows me to use better preamps and A/D conversions and i also have more control of I/O and can facilitate way more throughput.

but if you just wanna get a few riffs down then using a 1/8" TRS patch cable with a 1/4" TRS to TS adapter can work.

Quote by Zero111311
I have an Orange CR120C it's a 120 watt solid state amp that has 2 output jacks for speakers. Now could I use the above method and output one of the speaker lines to a headphone converter and then to my pc? or would that fry my amp or something?


do not do this, it would probably fry your sound card on your computer pretty quickly.

if you want to run your signal through your amp and into your computer then use the FX send jack instead. this will send the signal from your amp's preamp out to your computer and it won't fry anything

Quote by Zero111311
And also, in everyones opinion, what is the best way to record guitar on the comp that is cost efficient?


no best ways out there, just a whole bunch of different ways:

-direct to native soundcard
-usb mics
-tons and tons of different usb or firewire interfaces

are just a few ways of doing things. since 'cost efficient' is fairly vague then you should probably list a budget and we could recommend quality options in your price range.
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#3
Get an audio interface.....

Also, you cannot directly record a guitar amp unless it has a line out or anything with an impedance level that's line out or instrument out.

Like someone stated, using anything else than that will fry the shit out of your soundcard. Back in the day, I hooked up an out of my amp to my soundcard, and I cranked the volume too hard and now about 80% of my back audio inputs and outputs don't work anymore.
#4
I'm looking for something to use to get my amp's sound for under $200, if I can't run my amp to my PC for that much then maybe a bit higher or just something that will be easy to use with lots of tone, nothing too digital. I had a DigiTech modeler at some point and I didn't like how digital it sounded
#5
Like I said, if your amp doesn't have any outputs with a line level, then you have to use a microphone setup.

Also, please don't say something digital sounds "too digital". That doesn't really make sense. What you mean is that it sounded fake. Being digital has nothing to do with how fake it sounds, it has to do with how well it was design in the programming.
#6
Here is what you want:

Shure SM57 Microphone $130~
Avid MBox comes with Pro Tools 200-300$~
XLR Mic Cable 10-20$~
Mic Stand 10-20$~

Use the Shure microphone to record the amp tone into Pro Tools via the MBox.

Or substitute the microphone with the Amplitube 3 plug-in and plug your guitar direct into your MBox.

Amplitube is far superior to most if not all digital sound processors and will give you near accurate tube tone.

GL
Last edited by spicyfourpiece at Jan 5, 2014,
#8
Just go to the Recordings forum and read the stickies.

All of your questions will be answered.
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#10
Quote by Downfall93
Guitar directly into line in, Reaper + Guitar Rig

No.
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#11
I've tried this in the past. I don't know why, but I get a slight delay. About 500 ms.
#12
Quote by shawnkenneth
I've tried this in the past. I don't know why, but I get a slight delay. About 500 ms.

asio driver fixes it.

Quote by GaryBillington
No.

Solid arguments.
Last edited by Downfall93 at Jan 5, 2014,
#13
Quote by Downfall93
asio driver fixes it.


Solid arguments.


It is, because most basic soundcard inputs are garbage.

I hated using my computer as an amp because of the complete shit garbage quality of using line-in as an input for them, but I loved the concept.
After I got an audio interface, I was blown away and was very happy, and use my computer as my amp for now.

That's how much of a difference it made for me. The only complaint I have is that I wish I gotten an presonus over an m-audio interface.
#14
Quote by Downfall93
asio driver fixes it.


Thank you!
I honestly thought the latency was never gonna be fixable.
#15
Quote by shawnkenneth
Thank you!
I honestly thought the latency was never gonna be fixable.


While you do use this (awful) setup, yes, get ASIO4ALL to kill latency.

In the meanwhile, invest in an audio interface so you:
1) Don't rink frying your soundcard
2) Have an appropriate quality input

When you do, look at the specs of the device and make sure the signal noise ratio is below -80db. Look and see the max sample rate and bit depth.
I personally don't have a problem with using 48khz, but 96khz is probably a nice max samplerate to be able to have.
Bit depth should be at least 24 bits.

Make sure to get the one that's appropriate for your needs. If you ever consider wanting to use MIDI, get one with MIDI I/O.
Get 2 audio inputs minimum.

Like I said, I suggest the Presonus AudioBox.
#16
Quote by Downfall93

Solid arguments.


It is when Gary is one of the most respected recording regulars on the forum.
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#17
Quote by ChemicalFire
It is when Gary is one of the most respected recording regulars on the forum.


Yes, also, Guitar IS NOT LINE LEVEL.
GET AN INTERFACE.
#18
I don't get this "line level" argument.. If the gain on the input is adjustable what does it matter if it's "line level" or hi-z..
Last edited by spicyfourpiece at Jan 21, 2014,
#19
Quote by spicyfourpiece
I don't get this "line level" arguement.. If the gain on the input is adjustable what does it matter if it's "line level" or hi-z..

It's to do with impedance mismatching and a whole bunch of electrical bullcrap that's way more complicated to understand than it's worth.
#20
I understand. Impedance mismatching can be a serious issue with a speaker cable from the head to a cab because you could fry the output tranny.

With a line level input with an adjustable gain; isn't the gain pot a sort of variable resistor? Thus the impedance can be adjusted?

I would think latency and line noise would be the greatest issue here.
Last edited by spicyfourpiece at Jan 21, 2014,
#21
Quote by spicyfourpiece
I understand. Impedance mismatching can be a serious issue with a speaker cable from the head to a cab because you could fry the output tranny.

With a line level input with an adjustable gain; isn't the gain pot a sort of variable resistor? Thus the impedance can be adjusted?

I would think latency and line noise would be the greatest issue here.

Without wanting to start the debate again, read through this thread:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1630045

It discusses this subject and includes several posts that explain why it is a terrible idea to attempt to connect to a PC without the correct interface.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#23
Rocksmith USB cable. $30 bucks, no lag with ASIO4All drivers. Great for amatuers like me. lol
#24
Quote by Who Sh0t Ya HxO
Line 6 POD UX1. Simple. Professional.

As much as I love Line 6. I HATE their POD Studio interfaces. Mine broke within less than a year for no reason.

Also heard the DAC/ADC are bad, not sure if this is true or not.

Noise level is great though.
#25
Quote by spicyfourpiece
I understand. Impedance mismatching can be a serious issue with a speaker cable from the head to a cab because you could fry the output tranny.

With a line level input with an adjustable gain; isn't the gain pot a sort of variable resistor? Thus the impedance can be adjusted?

I would think latency and line noise would be the greatest issue here.

The reason it doesn't work is because guitars and line level have hugely different impedance levels. When you plug a guitar into a line level input, the main/easily-noticeable problems are the loss of high-end/presence, poor signal level (and deterioration of signal to noise ratio as you have to boost the gain) and a complete lack of the feeling of playing into a decent preamp.

You also have to remember that stock soundcards aren't designed for the task, so often have little in the way of preamps and their A/D converters are absolutely terrible. This results in a poor signal before you even reach the amp sims or your DAW. The old adage says "You can't polish a turd" and that strikes gold here too - you might get passable results for demoing an idea, but you'll never reach the sort of quality found on decent commercial releases.

The other benefits to an external audio interface (or a proper, dedicated professional sound card, although they're far rarer now and entry level ones barely exist) are the ability to have control over your gainstaging ahead of the conversion process and input to the computer. Your stock soundcard probably doesn't have onboard gain controls or anything beyond an input jack at the rear of the PC. This means you can't boost the preamp gain, which inevitably means you're probably going to raise the gain or (for simplicity's sake) the level of the signal in your DAW but that will raise everything, including the noisefloor which will be a lot closer to the level of your signal than if you were able to boost your signal's level on a decent preamp without adding so much noise.

You might also encounter all the artifacts of poor A/D (Analogue to Digital) conversion on a cheap sound card, such as aliasing or distortion of the waveform if your sound card only supports low sample rates or has poor sample rate clocking, or low bit-depth (also called resolution) if it doesn't support a decent resolution (typically we record with a bit-depth of 24-Bits now... this means that there are 2 to the power of 24 potential volume/amplitude levels that the signal can be. If your sound card is designed for basic stuff, it is probably 16-Bit at best, which is a much smaller dynamic range and also means a lower accuracy for tracking the incoming signal).


Obviously, it will work if you plug your guitar into the computer in that way but it really won't sound particularly inspiring or expensive, for want of a better word. My advice, as echoed by plenty of others, for a low budget would be to buy a single input guitar interface like the Guitar Link, and use that to go into freeware amp sims (I personally favour LePou's plugins, particularly LE456 for anything rock or metal), then a decent impulse response of a guitar speaker cabinet, and record in a DAW of your choice (probably Reaper as it's the cheapest, unless you were on a Mac and could use Garageband which is free).
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