#1
Just wondering are chords supposed to fit in scales perfectly?
For example:

When I play in G I play Em E,G,B which all fit perfectly in scale,
but when I play in B I play C#m, C#, E, Ab.
I am following the pattern for minor chords (root +m3+M3)
so let me know if I'm wrong and help me out.
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
Last edited by eric_wearing at Jan 8, 2014,
#2
Not all chords fit all scales (for example E minor doesn't fit Eb major scale). But all minor chords fit some scale. C#m is a chord in B major. But major third from E is not Ab, it's G#. There's always a third between E and G and a fourth between E and A. So the interval between E and Ab would be diminished fourth, not major third (even though the sound is the same). So if you replace that Ab with a G# (which again sounds the same), it fits the B minor scale.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#3
what you want to learn is how to harmonize a scale
here read through these lessons
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons

they were very helpful to me years ago and im sure theyll be helpful to you
#4
well...I don't like to freakout my eyes and brain.
I like to keep things simple. Chords are just EVERY OTHER NOTE.

mmmm...just because I label A sting 4fret whatever the who name...it's not going to give me a different pitch magically

1,3,5,7,9,11,13.......Yeap those look like every other numbers.
The 9 is like 2 and so on and so forth. 2 ,4,6 Yeap, that covers all the notes

When start your count or root of the scale from various degree, the names
or - + might change....but it's Still EVERY OTHER NOTE.

All you have to do is remember. ALL Minor chords have a flat 3 or -3.
That's why it's call a MINOR....smaller? less????
1,-3, 5
when you extend it, the 7h will also be a minor 7,...ect

The dominate (V) has a flat 7 when you extend it.


All you have to remember is this.
I,IV,V= Major
II, III, VI= minor....
VII = min flat5
that's just like saying ...1,4,5

The minor system isn't any different....
You're just going to start your count from the relative minor or VI. That's like
saying 6?

All you're doing is referencing everything from the major diatonic scale sequence.
AKA Ionian mode or scale.
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 6, 2014,
#5
1+4=5
2*3=6
7...lol diminished
that's just a simple way to remember I learned in the crusade columns. (all hail J. Urban lol). Anyway, I noticed most chords fit pretty well with taking a scale degree, skipping one, and taking the next. For example I+iii +V. is that always like that or is it circumstantial? I mean the major (M3+m3) and the minor (m3+M3) haven't failed me yet
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#6
Quote by eric_wearing
Just wondering are chords supposed to fit in scales perfectly?
For example:

When I play in G I play Em E,G,B which all fit perfectly in scale,
but when I play in B I play C#m, C#, E, Ab.
I am following the pattern for minor chords (root +m3+M3)
so let me know if I'm wrong and help me out.


There is no "supposed to."

The chords which fit diatonically into the scale of the key (eg, in G major: G, Am, Bm, C, D, Em, F#dim) are the most common chords, but lots of other chords get used. (in G, the next most common chords are probably F, Eb, Bb, and A, although lots of other show up too).

You don't compose by thinking about rules. You compose by hearing sounds in your head and then creating those sounds. If those sounds include notes that are outside the scale, that's just fine.
#8
just looking at this for reference and theory knowledge. I learned long ago that music theory is just theory. I tend to screw the "rules" and look at theory when I'm stuck like what would ne the next logical note in this solo progression.

in short, I'm just a music nerd :p
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!