#1
I never knew I had a problem with being on time until I started recording with my band. It's not that I'm off tempo, just that I always come a bit earlier than when I'm supposed to (story of my life). And I guess practicing with a metronome would be kind of pointless if I keep consistently playing before the beat and not noticing. So how should I practice to fix this? Just force myself to play a bit later than I'm naturally inclined to?

Also, I've noticed that my picking is not 'even' if you know what I mean. I go a bit off time when I have to pick fast (not tremolo).
Quote by MDoggDX316
To quote Granddad, "I think ALL marriage should be illegal."


[quote="'-[NiL"]-'] I asked him what tuning he put it in and he replied, "seventh."

Seventh.
#2
Counter-intuitively... slow down. Getting things on the beat it much harder at slow tempos, especially when you have to sub-divide the beat.

Another thing to do is record yourself more. Force yourself to play nothing but rhythm parts and practice multi-tracking if you can. It doesn't matter if the recordings sound terrible as long as you can hear what's going on. Use a super dry tone so nothing covers up the timing (no reverb, delay or any effects other than distortion if you want it).

A third thing you can do is try this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Sw_trDFJw8

This gets hard fast. Although not as hard as this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asYfvMzjk7M


Really though, I reckon you probably need to stop thinking so much and try to feel where the beat is. Tap your foot, nod your head, whatever it is you need to do to get the groove going physically in something other than just your hands.

Again though I'll say: almost everything with rhythm is harder when you're doing it slower. When you speed up it gets easier to just cram the notes in and they kind of sort themselves out but slowing down means you have to be absolutely exact with your timing or it sounds horrific.
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#3
something you may have "forgotten" is that your picking hand is basically doing percussion. every picking motion is deliberate and sure. you might be having trouble with picking evenly if, for example, you're not putting the same deliberation behind your upstrokes as you are with your downstrokes.

also, recording myself helped me a lot. try doing a cover of your favorite song (or one of your own) and double tracking the guitar parts... see how much you really suck =P
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#4
Quote by vIsIbleNoIsE
also, recording myself helped me a lot. try doing a cover of your favorite song (or one of your own) and double tracking the guitar parts... see how much you really suck =P


Even better... quad track things. Bloody hell that's hard...
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
Thanks for the tips! I'll start working on this today. When you guys say double tracking, you mean record the same guitar track twice and see if they match up? Or do you mean recording a cover guitar track for a song and then playing the original over it?
Quote by MDoggDX316
To quote Granddad, "I think ALL marriage should be illegal."


[quote="'-[NiL"]-'] I asked him what tuning he put it in and he replied, "seventh."

Seventh.
#6
Quote by purplexing
Thanks for the tips! I'll start working on this today. When you guys say double tracking, you mean record the same guitar track twice and see if they match up? Or do you mean recording a cover guitar track for a song and then playing the original over it?


Both will be useful but double- and quad-tracking are the techniques of playing the same parts two and four times respectively to make the track sound bigger. You can also use kind of the same technique but record the parts with different tones to get a quite different sound than you would get using just one amp and tone.

If you take a listen to my album (in my signature) all the distorted rhythm guitars were quad-tracked, with two different tones so on each side of the stereo spectrum there's two tracks each with a different tone. If you do it right you can get some really good sounds but it takes a lot of time and your playing has to be tight to make it work.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#7
I agree big time about double tracking. The first time I tried to double track some rhythm parts I got a rude awakening. 16th notes turned into this sort of rolling mush. Working on doubling yourself will improve your timing tremendously.