#2
Your intonation is crap and the octave is not in tune.
Quote by yellowfrizbee
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#3
I think it's called a sympathetic vibration. The 2nd fret of the D string is another E note, so when you play that, you're vibrating the neck, body (and air around it?). If you play that note and then stop it, you'll find that the E string started to vibrate because the vibration of the other note excited it. Pretty normal.

For reference - this is how you would get feedback (the good kind) - like you're pretending to be Jimi Hendrix. The amp gets your sound coming back at you and your guitar, it excites the string some more and then the string gets louder and so on...

Also, it's why you need to keep our fingers muting the strings while playing so that they don't start vibrating and ringing later when you don't want them to.
#4
Quote by timbo63
I think it's called a sympathetic vibration. The 2nd fret of the D string is another E note, so when you play that, you're vibrating the neck, body (and air around it?). If you play that note and then stop it, you'll find that the E string started to vibrate because the vibration of the other note excited it. Pretty normal.

For reference - this is how you would get feedback (the good kind) - like you're pretending to be Jimi Hendrix. The amp gets your sound coming back at you and your guitar, it excites the string some more and then the string gets louder and so on...

Also, it's why you need to keep our fingers muting the strings while playing so that they don't start vibrating and ringing later when you don't want them to.


Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe something similar happens with drums. If you turn your amp up around a drum kit then mess around on the fret board you'll find that a certain note will cause the snare wires to vibrate pretty loudly, which generally means the snare is tuned to the same note (or pretty close at least).
"Nothing of me is original, I am the combined effort of everyone I've ever known." -Chuck Palahniuk
#5
Yeah, that happens with drums too. People don't think of them as having a pitch, but I used to help our drummer try tuning them to different pitches. It can be sort of annoying when the guitar or bass notes start the snare drum trembling loudly, but I'm sure that's the same thing.
#6
So it's normal then?
Well, that sure is a relief, I thought everything was messed up.
Thanks.
#7
Quote by HellShreddah
So it's normal then?
Well, that sure is a relief, I thought everything was messed up.


It's normal, but avoidable. Most of the vibration is being transmitted through the bridge, which, after the saddles, is one piece, usually fairly lightweight not-particularly-dense material, so it transmits whatever note is ringing to the others. For some folks with dog ears, this can set up phasing interferences and all kinds of other harmonic strangeness that can be undesirable.

A few bridge designers have invented bridges that fight this tendency, but those bridges usually don't appear on less expensive guitars. In fact, they usually only appear on high end and semi-custom guitars. One example is the 2Tek bridge (the photo, below, is of the 4-string bass version, but it also comes in 5-string bass and 6-string guitar). As you can see, this sucker really works on eliminating crosstalk between the strings and is actually mounted in a rout that goes through the body and is bolted to the BACK of the guitar..

#8
Quote by timbo63
Yeah, that happens with drums too. People don't think of them as having a pitch, but I used to help our drummer try tuning them to different pitches. It can be sort of annoying when the guitar or bass notes start the snare drum trembling loudly, but I'm sure that's the same thing.


I've done the same (helped the drummer tune his drums). And yes, it's the same principle.
#9
Well, it's not even that noticeable, I'm pretty sure people won't notice it and I'll get used to it.
#10
Quote by timbo63
I think it's called a sympathetic vibration.

You would be correct. It's how sitars get their cosmic sound. It is one of those techniques that is kind of cool to take advantage of!
Q: Favourite Pink Floyd song?
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