#1
My intonation seems to be ok, open and 12th fret are the exact same notes (verified by ear, and by tuner), but for example fretting 15th on the b-string is about a quarter off.

I thuoght my tuner was just mesing around, it's v-amp 2 so i don't trust that much, but it's the only thing i have currently at my house where my better guitars are.

I then fretted f on the b string and f on the e string. and they sounded different.

Neck is straight, the strings aren't buzzing against the frets, they sound clear when picked. The guitar in question is esp-ltd Mh-1000 deluxe.

This problem seems only to be on strings e, b and g.
Last edited by esa.lackstrom at Jan 7, 2014,
#2
When you say that you've checked the 12th, was that a comparison of the fretted and harmonic at the 12th? Also, you haven't said which way it's off at the 15th... I'm guessing it's sharp? Do you apply a lot of pressure when you fret there?
#3
I checked that fretted vs harmonic. Harmonic seems to be a bit flat compared to fretted?
My english is far from perfect i try to be clear. When i fret the 12th its the same as open. When i do a harmonic on it (isn't it when you place finger directly over the fret?) it goes a bit flat.

My ear isn't absolute, so i have to rely on my tuner for these kind if differences, and the tuner on V-amp2 is what it is..

When fretted the notes are a bit sharp when going to the e => notes on the b string.
Last edited by esa.lackstrom at Jan 7, 2014,
#4
Intonation is a funny thing. Yes, checking harmonics vs fretted notes at the 12th fret is one of the most accurate ways but the theory behind a guitar string is a bit more complicated. When the string is at rest, then it will have a pretty much constant tension. Tune it higher the tension increases, tune it lower the tension decreases. Fret a note somewhere on the neck and there will be small fluctuations on the strings tension, resulting in a change in the sounding note, however slight. Unfortunately, it is one of the things that just happens.
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#5
How much bow do you have in your neck? Perhaps the neck gets flatter as you move further up it causing the change in intonation there. The straighter you can get your neck, the more consistent the intonation will be.
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#6
Not any noticeable bow, frets look like railroad tracks when looked along the neck. My friend should also come and look at it in few days, maybe he's got better eye than i do.

I also did put on flat surface, didn't notice bow in it.
#7
Quote by esa.lackstrom
I checked that fretted vs harmonic. Harmonic seems to be a bit flat compared to fretted?
My english is far from perfect i try to be clear. When i fret the 12th its the same as open. When i do a harmonic on it (isn't it when you place finger directly over the fret?) it goes a bit flat.

My ear isn't absolute, so i have to rely on my tuner for these kind if differences, and the tuner on V-amp2 is what it is..

When fretted the notes are a bit sharp when going to the e => notes on the b string.

Well, there is your problem. You have to tune it first to where the harmonic is in p erfect tune, then adjust the intonation to that. If the harmonic is flat, and fretted is fine, that means it is sharp.
#8
Quote by Explorerbuilder
Well, there is your problem. You have to tune it first to where the harmonic is in p erfect tune, then adjust the intonation to that. If the harmonic is flat, and fretted is fine, that means it is sharp.



This was new info, thank you for this :=)