#1
Hi there.
I need some tips on how to approach chord identifications. I know it helps to start out with basic intervals, and then recognize the intervals played harmonically.

I wonder when recognizing chords with 3 notes or more - if there is a best way to do it - what is the best way to recognize them? for example, should I do it just by the sound of the chord in a whole, or should I first recognize the distance from root to 3, then root to 5 (or b3 or b5 etc). OR should I recognize the distance from root to 3, then from 3 to 5?

I was wondering if one of the approaches is more "logical" to use/will make more sense to use? Or more important, will be more gaining for me to use.
Last edited by jazzlp at Jan 8, 2014,
#2
Basically both ways as you mentioned.

I start off with the triads. It's to help my ear and fingers distinguish the difference
of the major 3rd and minor third.

1,3,5 then 1, -3, 5....then 1,-3,-5.
I play it in a acending movment using only 2 strings ( A, D) starting at the C note (A string
3 fret)
The root note on the A string.

D---2------5
A------3---------

D----3--------7
A--------5-------

D----12------15
A--------14-------

and so on and so forth to the 15th fret or octive.

It'll also help me to know the intervals of the diatonic scale.
Plus..... Maj, min, min, Maj, Maj, min, Dim....sequnce.

I, IV, V = major
II, III, VI = min
VII = dim

Then extedning to 3 strings or more arpeggios.
Example Gmaj

E-----7---------10
B-------8-------------
G-----7----------------
D------------9--------
A---------------10-----
E-----------------------

and so on and so forth......

I do the samething with a scale. I break it down .
example..D min pentatonic.

G----------5-------7--
D----------5-------7---
A---------(5)------------8--


D Aeolian... I added 2 notes. The 2 and -6

G---------5--------7----
D---------5--------7--8--
A--------(5)-------7--8---
E--------------------------

D Phrygain. It's just a flat2 from the aeolian.

G---------5--------7-----
D---------5--------7--8--
A--------(5)-6--------8...

And so on and so forth..

F major Pentatonic

G-----7------------10---
D-----7------------10---
A--------8---------10---


G mixolian...adding the 4 and 7
(2 octive)

E-------------------12--13---------15----
B------------------12---13---------15--
G-----9--10------(12)------14----------
D-----9--10-------12-------------------
A-------(10)-------12------------------
E-----------------------------------------

There's plenty more I do...but cant cram everything in,lol
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 8, 2014,
#3
Quote by jazzlp
Hi there.
I need some tips on how to approach chord identifications. I know it helps to start out with basic intervals, and then recognize the intervals played harmonically.

I wonder when recognizing chords with 3 notes or more - if there is a best way to do it - what is the best way to recognize them? for example, should I do it just by the sound of the chord in a whole, or should I first recognize the distance from root to 3, then root to 5 (or b3 or b5 etc). OR should I recognize the distance from root to 3, then from 3 to 5?

I was wondering if one of the approaches is more "logical" to use/will make more sense to use? Or more important, will be more gaining for me to use.


The way I do it:

First of all, I know the notes of every chord. And I can pretty much work them instantly.

I can look at the notes of whatever chord is being played on the neck, and determine what most likely the chord will be in a harmonic and functional context.

Why do I say it that way? Because, on guitar, not all the notes are always accounted for in a given chord, especially among extended chords. So, knowing the suggested chord by determining the essential tones that are there, also helps.

Take a 13th chord, Say A13.

That's 7 notes. R 3 5 b7 9 11 13 A C# E G B D F#

But I know that 5 x 5 6 7 7 is an A13 Chord on the guitar, but those notes are:

A the Root, G, the b7, C# the M3, F# the 13 and B the 9th. (Most times, I might omit the 9th and use the 11th as it's the farthest note of my extended chord).

A G C# F# B - Doesn't, at first glance, reveal any triads. But defining of these intervals to the Root, in a Harmonic Context, (say Em9 to A13) would reveal the likely chord. Note, although there are things like slash chords and inversions, my first port of call is to examine the Bass note, as if it is the root note and proceeding from there.

For me this is the easiest method, because its almost immediate.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jan 9, 2014,
#4
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#5
Thank you for the replies. Not sure how henryperr´s answer will help me, but thank you anyways. My goal is to be able to identify pretty advanced chord progressions just by listening. Been working with basic intervals for a while, and now I´ve begun with triads. It´s a slow process, but I am getting there. I am btw using ear master pro. Highly recommended.