#1
Hey guys I'm wondering if orange cabs are more directional than let's say a marshall. My 2x12 cab only sounds good when I'm at the same level as the speakers. (face smashing the ground). I got a stand to fix this. Do all amp cabs do this? or just Orange. or just 2x12s
#2
More or less every closed back cab does this.
Name's Luca.

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#3
The reason people use the angled 4x12 cabs is they give a wider sound projection. But as Spambot said, closed back cabs generally have a beam-like sound projection
My Gear:- A guitar, a guitar lead, a guitar amplifier. Or sometimes just an acoustic guitar!
#4
Quote by Spambot_2
More or less every closed back cab does this.


No, they don't.

An open-back cab has sound coming from the back of the speaker as well, but that's about all. If there's nothing to reflect that sound back toward the front of the speaker (essentially, toward the listener), you simply won't hear it.

Dispersion, for a closed back speaker cabinet, depends on the actual cone size of a single speaker and refers not to bass, but to a narrowing or "beaming" of frequencies above a certain wavelength associated with the cone diameter.

If you're talking about a single 12" speaker, you can find the frequency at which beaming will become evident (and narrower and more pronounced above this frequency) by taking the actual cone diameter (about 10.3" on a 12" speaker and dividing it into 13,500 (the speed of light in inches/second). 13,500/10.3 = about 1311Hz, roughly an E(6), As a basis of comparison, the high E string on a guitar is generally an E(4) and the 24th fret on that string is an E(6). So we're talking about any frequencies (including harmonics) that start there and go up.

If you put two 12" speakers together, you have a hybrid -- in one direction (if you put the 2x12 on end, vertically, with one 12" speaker over the other), the side to side dispersion frequency pattern is about the same as a single 12" speaker. In the other direction (if you lay the 2x12 down horizontally), the pair of speakers acts like one big speaker of about 26", and treble beaming begins at about 520Hz. This is why it's better to put your 2x12 up vertically.

If you put four 12" speakers together in a square, the entire cabinet works roughly like a single large speaker with a cone diameter of 30" or more (even the slanted-front versions), and beaming becomes pronounced above 450Hz (A4=440Hz). In short, off axis you sound mellow and godlike, but audience members who catch that cabinet on-axis get their ears pierced, and wonder why that idiot guitar player can't hear how bad he sounds.
#5
Quote by dspellman
An open-back cab has sound coming from the back of the speaker as well, but that's about all. If there's nothing to reflect that sound back toward the front of the speaker (essentially, toward the listener), you simply won't hear it.
Well unless you're playing in a really large space (say a venue) you usually have walls to reflect the sound, and walls help spreading the sound a lot.

What would be the use of your cabs, TS?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.