#1
Hey guys, I have a guitar with a floyd rose floating tremolo. I want to be able to palm mute, and not have to be so gentle about it. Being able to do double stops and unison bends would be fantastic as well. I want everything to stay in tune.

Now that you know exactly what I want, what method would be best for me? Having the guitar setup and in the process having the floyd blocked off would solve all of these problems, but then, I wouldn't be able to use my tremolo system... To be honest, this method is kind of my last resort, if the tremsetter and tremol-no arent worth it in the end.

I've heard some things about the tremsetter, but I watched the setup video, and there is no way I would even attempt that on my own, not to mention that my local guitar tech would probably **** me on the price of installing it. I plan on drop tuning this guitar. It's either going or in Drop C, or C Standard, depending on which way I decide to go in the end. This might make using the tremsetter difficult, as the system uses two springs, with the addition of the last piece, which is a spring type mechanism as well.

With the tremelo-no, I think I could drop tune, as the claw goes in, and then I think theres still room for additional springs, though I'd have to double check.

What I REALLY need to know though, is if any of you guys have used the hardtail mode of the tremel-no. Does it actually allow you to do fast, heavy palm muting?? Do the unison bends really stay in tune? If I bend a string while an adjacent open string is ringing, will it stay in tune???

I appreciate you guys taking the time to read this. Please offer your insight to me. I just wanna know if I can get what Im looking for with the tremel-no, or if I have to go with a blocked off floyd...
#2
I wouldn't bother with the tremol-no, honestly. The screw that holds it in place periodically loosens causing it to lose tuning and lose the position of the bridge that you wanted it set at. I found that tuning much more than a half step up from what you were in when you set it causes it to slide a bit. I eventually took mine out and just shoved some shims in there to block it off (I don't use the trem anyway).

I suppose it probably would work alright well if you keep it in one tuning, but if you want to change tunings it's a bit of a hassle. I suspect there are better solutions out there though. I'm not familiar with the tremsetter.

A quick google brings up this site, I dunno if it is helpful or not:
http://joe.emenaker.com/TremStabilizers/index.html

Has a few reviews of stabilization units that you might look into.
#3
The Tremol-no is good at what it does if you use it to go from floating to fixed bridge. I agree that it isn't really any good for changing tunings. You still have to adjust the springs and everything else.

I've used the Hipshot and the Black Box tremsetters extensively. Neither of them really does much IMO. The Black Box works best for me but limits your upward movement of the tremolo. You can dive fine then pull back to get your strings back in tune and the Black Box will push the bridge back to the proper position so your tuning ends up pretty close to where it should be. The Hipshot is suppose to work like this in either direction. It doesn't. I found it to severely limit the travel of the tremolo and didn't work very well at all to push it back into tune.
#4
@Poppameth; Shisui's eye.. nice... And to be honest, I already accepted the fact that double locking trem equipped guitars usually work best in one tuning. It wasnt my intention to go around switching tunings and what-not.

I just want to know if the tremol-no will allow me to play aggressive, palm-muted metal while in hard-tail mode, and if blocking the trem with a few extra springs and some wooden blocks will give me the same effect...

Is having your guitar in hard-tail mode the exact same thing as having your floyd blocked off? That's the only reason that I wanna do this. I want unison bends to stay in tune, and I wanna have the freedom of knowing that I can palm mute as hard as I want. That way, I dont have to second guess myself everytime I try and play the damn thing. I dont wanna have to say in my own head while I'm playing, "Shit, am I palm muting too hard? Should I try and move my picking hand up to find that sweet spot? Why does this sound sharp and thin all of a sudden?...."

You see my point... So again, for what I'm looking for, should I go with hardtail mode or just block my floyd off all together?
Last edited by DeathShredder23 at Jan 10, 2014,
#5
I have just installed Goldo and to be honest i'm not sure if it really does much......but I will say the initial tune up was a lot faster than usual and I can from E to a drop D tuning and the other strings stay in tune. My palm muting is super heavy so not sure if it helps with that. I think if you have a heavy right hand then you will struggle to stop a floating trem for going sharp in any situation. I think the best solution is to have the floyd dive only (how often to you pull up on the bar??) and tighten the springs really tight and your double stop bends should be sweet
Last edited by sytharnia1560 at Jan 10, 2014,
#6
I have my Tremol-no locked and it works fine, but i have a lighter muting technique. If you really slam it then it will slip easier. I think you are best off to block it for dive only with heavy and stiff springs. If you have plenty of spring tension to hold the bridge down tight then you'll have no issues with what you are trying to do. The tremol-no won't perform as well IMO.
#7
Quote by poppameth
I have my Tremol-no locked and it works fine, but i have a lighter muting technique. If you really slam it then it will slip easier. I think you are best off to block it for dive only with heavy and stiff springs. If you have plenty of spring tension to hold the bridge down tight then you'll have no issues with what you are trying to do. The tremol-no won't perform as well IMO.



So if I have the tech block it off for dive only, that'll make the unison bends stay in tune better, AND I'll be able to palm mute a bit harder?

Also, this is just out of curiosity, (because your suggestion sounds like what I want) but IF I did have it set up for a full block off, obviously I wouldnt be able to use the bar unless I took the wood out, but would palm muting be so tight that I wouldnt have to worry about pick hand pressure???

Again, not what I plan on doing now that you've just suggested a "dive only" block off...

I'm just curious is all...
#8
Quote by DeathShredder23
So if I have the tech block it off for dive only, that'll make the unison bends stay in tune better, AND I'll be able to palm mute a bit harder?

Also, this is just out of curiosity, (because your suggestion sounds like what I want) but IF I did have it set up for a full block off, obviously I wouldnt be able to use the bar unless I took the wood out, but would palm muting be so tight that I wouldnt have to worry about pick hand pressure???

Again, not what I plan on doing now that you've just suggested a "dive only" block off...

I'm just curious is all...


the block won't help with bends, that's where the tighter springs come in...and yes the block stops trem from moving any closer to the neck end so the springs can't slacken so you can push down as hard as you like and it won't effect anything
#9
Yep, installing a block toward the spring side of the cavity and cranking the springs down tight will make the bridge completely solid when pressing on it from above. It won't be able to pull back at all. You can still dive just fine though, albeit with more effort due to increased spring tension. As for unison bending, that depends on how much tension you are willing to put on the springs. You have to balance it to where it feels best for you. It may be a compromise between unison bending stability and how stiff it feels when you dive.
#10
Thanks for the responses fellas. I think I'm gonna order the trem stopper from floyd upgrades and try to do it myself.