#1
I'm self taught and have been playing for years now, but one thing I just can't seem to get the hang of is stepping transitions between chords. I can step between a G and Em chord but that's all, and I can't seem to find any articles or videos online to help.

Maybe there's a more technical term and I'm searching for the wrong thing?

Any tips would be appreciated!
#3
Yep, ut rather than just moving from one chord to another, kind of stepping into the next chord?

For G to Em, I go

e|-3------3------3--------|
B|-3------3------3--------|
G|--------------------------|
D|----------------2--------|
A|-2--------------2--------|
E|-3------2----------------|
#4
Quote by SophieIsabella


For G to Em, I go

e|-3------3------3--------|
B|-3------3------3--------|
G|--------------------------|
D|----------------2--------|
A|-2--------------2--------|
E|-3------2----------------|


It's a common misconception that the chord you wrote there is a G chord. traditionally a G chord would not have the 3rd fret (D note) played on the B string and it would instead be an open string. It took me a good 2 or 3 years before i knew this to be honest and when i found out i was like whatttt.
Don't get me wrong, it is still a G chord because it retains the notes G, B and D, but if someone asked you to play a G chord they wouldn't usually refer to that particular voicing.
#5
Quote by vayne92
It's a common misconception that the chord you wrote there is a G chord. traditionally a G chord would not have the 3rd fret (D note) played on the B string and it would instead be an open string. It took me a good 2 or 3 years before i knew this to be honest and when i found out i was like whatttt.
Don't get me wrong, it is still a G chord because it retains the notes G, B and D, but if someone asked you to play a G chord they wouldn't usually refer to that particular voicing.


Oh, yep, I should have mentioned that- that variation of G is used traditionally in country music which is what I play so I usually use that but I do transition from a standard G the same way. I actually started with the standard G and found it really difficult to make myself do the variation- it took months for me to get the hang of it!
#6
In essence what you're wanting to do is very simple, find out what key you're in then use the notes of that scale to fill in the notes between chords that aren't adjacent to each other.

So if you're in the key of C major

Your chords are
C Dm Em F G Am Bdim

And your C major scale is
C D E F G A B

So if you're wanting to step between, for example, Am and Dm you would use the B and C to step up, or G F and E to step down. You don't just have to use single notes though, you can also expand on that idea and use full chords or chord fragments as those stepping stones. You can also have the bassline move further than the rest of the chord to help that feeling of motion and reinforce the transitional nature of that stepping stone chord . That's similar to how your example works although it would probably work better with a D/F# as your stepping stone so


3  0  0
3  3  0
0  2  0
0  x  2
x  x  2
3  2  0


You can also use other chromatic tones as passing tones if you want that sound, and if your song uses chords borrowed from other keys then you may have to wing it a little bit. However as a starting point using the notes of the scale is the simplest way to get a smooth, natural sounding movement between chords.
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