#1
the thing is..
when im recording guitars with distortion (amp+mic) they sound nothing like what i hear.. it sound more like if it was recorded direct in line.. i have to use a lot of effects to make it sound slightly better.. but still nowhere close to what i hear from the amp..

is that normal?
or what could be the problem??.. mic? mic placement? amp? interface?

*the mic im using is a copy of Sm57.. i havent compared it with the sm57, but i heard its pretty close..
* tested a lot of mic placements with similar results
* Laney Lv300
* interface Steinberg Ci1
#2
Clips?
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#3
Recording will produce a slightly different sound to what you're used to.

Your SM57 copy will focus on certain frequencies more than others, cheaper mics tend to miss out on a bit of the bottom end. Also, as you're recording a distorted tone, use less distortion than you think you need to.

Also remember that when you listen to a recording, you aren't listening through your amp's speaker, you're listening through your monitors/headphones/whatever. They will flavour the sound differently to your amp as well.

In short, at least some eq and a good amount of mixing will almost always be required in a recording to make it sound good.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#4
Also most "on record" guitar tones tend to sound like shit on their own.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#5
Personally, I gave up on recording a guitar amp. An SM57 should work fine, but for me, I always struggled too much and got too much bleed from other instruments (if the guitar stops and drums are loud, you'll still get drums in your guitar track). Don't let me discourage you too much because this is done all the time and if you get enough physical and acoustic separation, and some processing downstream, it will be fine.

These days, I use and Line6 Pod HD500, which has a pretty sophisticated recording emulation - you can pick the amp and the mic, the mic angle and placement (all emulated) and then send it direct to your recording medium. Some amps have a built in poor-man's cabinet simulator. In those, you can get a sound out from your amp's front-end that essentially emulates the affect of just the output stage and you can send that direct to your recording medium. You might need a little EQ and room reverb added on top of that. It's not going to simulate all the subtleties of mic placement, but it's probably good enough for learning to record.
#6
Quote by ChemicalFire
Clips?

you can listen on my soundcloud my last (first) recording (https://soundcloud.com/mariojbg).. although on the songs on soundcloud they have a lot of effects to try to sound a little better, but still doesnt sound much good..

im trying to fix the sound for my next recording.. lots of people complaining about it

Quote by GaryBillington
Recording will produce a slightly different sound to what you're used to.

Your SM57 copy will focus on certain frequencies more than others, cheaper mics tend to miss out on a bit of the bottom end. Also, as you're recording a distorted tone, use less distortion than you think you need to.

Also remember that when you listen to a recording, you aren't listening through your amp's speaker, you're listening through your monitors/headphones/whatever. They will flavour the sound differently to your amp as well.

In short, at least some eq and a good amount of mixing will almost always be required in a recording to make it sound good.


thank you.. i think thats probably a big part of the problem, im listening through amp speaker and headphones.. im playing/recording in the same room as the amp so thats probably "confusing" me.. ill see if i can isolate it so i can hear the headphones better
#7
Quote by timbo63
Personally, I gave up on recording a guitar amp. An SM57 should work fine, but for me, I always struggled too much and got too much bleed from other instruments (if the guitar stops and drums are loud, you'll still get drums in your guitar track). Don't let me discourage you too much because this is done all the time and if you get enough physical and acoustic separation, and some processing downstream, it will be fine.

These days, I use and Line6 Pod HD500, which has a pretty sophisticated recording emulation - you can pick the amp and the mic, the mic angle and placement (all emulated) and then send it direct to your recording medium. Some amps have a built in poor-man's cabinet simulator. In those, you can get a sound out from your amp's front-end that essentially emulates the affect of just the output stage and you can send that direct to your recording medium. You might need a little EQ and room reverb added on top of that. It's not going to simulate all the subtleties of mic placement, but it's probably good enough for learning to record.


ive tried using GuitarRig but couldnt get any sound that satisfied me out of it.. so im recording the amp..
ive seen lots of Pod Hd videos on youtube.. and i really want one or similar. but for the moment im stuck with mics or vst.
#8
I can't listen on this computer, but here is something to consider. The sound your ears hear is not always the sound the mic hears. The reason is that the mic is right up in the grille of the amp. Your ears are about five feet away and considerably off-axis to the speaker. That makes a huge difference.

Solution: Get your ear down near the speaker and hear what the mic is hearing so that you can make adjustments before you hit record.... or.... graft some ears onto your calves.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
let me add that what im struggling to get is a nice lead tone..

you can hear what im getting almost raw on this track at about 1:17
https://soundcloud.com/mariojbg/09-one-armed-bandits
the background guitar.. thats 2 takes (1 right, 1 left) but the sound is almost what im getting without any vst.. there are still some effects on it
it sound nothing like my amp.. lol
Last edited by mjbg at Jan 10, 2014,
#10
Geez, I expected it to sound horrible - that's not bad to me. I can hear how you might tweak it a bit though to get the sound you're after. You might concentrate first on just the guitar (without the other instruments, affects, etc). When I used to record an amp, I used to try to keep the amp and mic further away so that it wasn't coming into the headphones. Realize that there's a lot you can do with mic placement and it's going to be hard to figure out the best for you.

You might try starting up the recording and then moving the mic around. Yell towards the mic what the next configuration is and then just playback all of them and see if anything works for you. You can have the amp on the floor or elevated, the mic inline with the side or the middle of the one, then change the angle of the mic (angled direct or angled off at 45 degrees, etc). Also how close it is to the speaker (there's probably other ideas on the forum). But those things will all affect the recording in ways that you don't hear when standing and listening across a room.
#11
mmm...you have to studiy a little bit about sound waves.

Furtunately my father has a recording studio with lots of recording equipments.
He also gave me alot of books about sound waves.
He also gave me a couple of decent mics.
His thing was to alway to get me to record with the cleanest tone as possible
whthout a lot of FX. You can always add the FX later.

Yes, it's where you put the mic when you live mic and what kind of mic.
You learn as you go, I actULLY got the sound i wanted with the crappy mic.
but I had to set it a certain way...to side of the speaker. On my little practice amp.
Errr....there's possibly no way my woman would let me crank up my half stack
night and day to record.lmao

She was very happy that I got a GT8 and tascam. I went in direct.
I just adjusted the world Eq on it.
GT8 had cabints and mic simulations. You can move the mic around and use different mics.
What it allowed me to do is achive the same tone I wanted consistantly.

Aftter a while. It gets old to have to record the entire song again and again just to make correct some little mistakes. If you have consistant tones...you can make corrections
easier. Splice it in or whatever.

It works great for writing solos becuase your going to experince up the wazooo
in phrasing.

When you start writing muti guitar tracks...you want those guitars to have different tones.
Use different heads, cabinets or mics.
And youre not going to get it all done in one night.

You can get all that stuff on vst now.

Yes, when you mix down. The head phone you use will also make a difference.
Just becareful...mix it all down then play it on different stereo system...becuase
the bass might be too loud or your guitar tone will sound different on a stereo system.
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 10, 2014,
#12
Quote by timbo63
Geez, I expected it to sound horrible - that's not bad to me. I can hear how you might tweak it a bit though to get the sound you're after. You might concentrate first on just the guitar (without the other instruments, affects, etc). When I used to record an amp, I used to try to keep the amp and mic further away so that it wasn't coming into the headphones. Realize that there's a lot you can do with mic placement and it's going to be hard to figure out the best for you.

You might try starting up the recording and then moving the mic around. Yell towards the mic what the next configuration is and then just playback all of them and see if anything works for you. You can have the amp on the floor or elevated, the mic inline with the side or the middle of the one, then change the angle of the mic (angled direct or angled off at 45 degrees, etc). Also how close it is to the speaker (there's probably other ideas on the forum). But those things will all affect the recording in ways that you don't hear when standing and listening across a room.


Quote by smc818
mmm...you have to studiy a little bit about sound waves.

Furtunately my father has a recording studio with lots of recording equipments.
He also gave me alot of books about sound waves.
He also gave me a couple of decent mics.
His thing was to alway to get me to record with the cleanest tone as possible
whthout a lot of FX. You can always add the FX later.

Yes, it's where you put the mic when you live mic and what kind of mic.
You learn as you go, I actULLY got the sound i wanted with the crappy mic.
but I had to set it a certain way...to side of the speaker. On my little practice amp.
Errr....there's possibly no way my woman would let me crank up my half stack
night and day to record.lmao

She was very happy that I got a GT8 and tascam. I went in direct.
I just adjusted the world Eq on it.
GT8 had cabints and mic simulations. You can move the mic around and use different mics.
What it allowed me to do is achive the same tone I wanted consistantly.

Aftter a while. It gets old to have to record the entire song again and again just to make correct some little mistakes. If you have consistant tones...you can make corrections
easier. Splice it in or whatever.

It works great for writing solos becuase your going to experince up the wazooo
in phrasing.

When you start writing muti guitar tracks...you want those guitars to have different tones.
Use different heads, cabinets or mics.
And youre not going to get it all done in one night.

Yes, when you mix down. The head phone you use will also make a difference.
Just becareful...mix it all down then play it on different stereo system...becuase
the bass might be too loud or your guitar tone will sound different on a stereo system.


thank you for the tips..

i guess is pretty much trial and error thing..
ive just tried using a Sm58 instead of Sm57 and sounded a lot better.. both are chinese copies by the way..
#13
yeah....you learn as you go. When you start mixing in everything...the drums, the bass...ect
It'll have an effect on the tone of the guitar sounds.
Lets say you had some reverb on the rhyhem guitar. It sounds okay by itself but when
you add the lead part in...it's too much reverb.
You can always add...but it's hard to remove.lmao

Sometimes the stupid bass would just drown out everythng like it's phasing in and out
on certain parts beuase of the frequenzy.

A good mix down head phone with a wide range is highly recommended.
You'll mix it over and over again just to see the difference in the reverb setting
or type in the mix down. How much pan for the veriouse instruments...ect

I used a cheap bronze warlock for most of my recordings while my jackons
and ibenez just sat in the cases.lmao