#1
Hello dear UG members!! I play a Sterling by MusicMan JP60 which has a fixed bridge featuring modern trem system. I haven’t snapped any strings installed on this guitar since I purchased it around a year ago. But after a long time I decided to replace the existing strings (.10-.46) that it came from the store with a brand new set of Ernie Ball .9-.42 strings. I also decided to clean the whole guitar when it doesn’t have any strings installed while changing the strings. So I removed all the strings at first and I suddenly noticed the bridge of the guitar leaned towards the cavity of the guitar body where the bridge is accommodated. I instantly panicked and thought if I install the whole set then it will be alright. So I cleaned up the guitar and install fresh set of strings. The bridge did rise up a bit from the leaned position but it still hasn’t become parallel and even to the body of the guitar. Can you people tell me how can I fix this problem?
#3
If it has a tremolo, it's not a fixed bridge.


Unscrew the plate on the back of the guitar.



You should see something like this.



Loosen those screws a little bit.
#4
Quote by Lol Natures
If it has a tremolo, it's not a fixed bridge....

Thanks for helping, loosening up those screws did help to rise up the bridge a bit but I’m afraid that what if the screws come out if I continue to loosen the screws as the bridge is still not even towards the body. Is this a really big problem? I haven’t used this kind of guitar before so I am very confused. And what are the marked pivot screws as it is shown in the image? What do they do? I’m asking as I did try to move them with a hexagon screw driver type thing, all that resulted to move the screws up and down the bridge. Have I screwed up my guitar’s set up?

#5
Quote by chookiecookie
not sure if it's the same trem....

Thanks for your honest intention to help, but I don't own a floyd rose bridge guitar.
#6
Quote by stranger_23
Thanks for your honest intention to help, but I don't own a floyd rose bridge guitar.


It really doesn't matter that much which tremolo it is... (Ok, Bigsby's are a different animal) Your tremolo has the basic parts mentioned...

What's happened is that you changed the gauge of the strings to a lower gauge which changes the need for as much spring tension to keep the bridge "Floating" (Floating tremolo Bridges allow you to change the pitch both up, by pulling up on the handle, and down by pushing the handle towards the guitar body.) When you go to a lighter string, the springs in the back of the guitar have to be loosened to relieve the tension, letting the back of the bridge lift, making it float once again.

The two screws you mentioned on the front of the guitar are just the pivot points of the bridge. don't tighten these to tight, or you'll inhibit the movement of the bridge and could damage the wood or break the screws...

Hope this helps..
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#7
Quote by Papabear505
It really doesn't matter that much which tremolo...

Now I understood why my bridge became uneven to the body. My bridge has become even to the body now and it moves easily with the tremolo arm. But I did use the hexagon screw driver type thing to the pivot screws. I honestly don’t know what to do now, how can I tell that the bridge is not damaging my guitar?
#8
look at the first page of the guitar setup thread, green link in my sig, and see if that helps.

feel free to post after looking at the first page.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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#9
Quote by jj1565
look at the first page of the guitar setup thread....

Thanks for the thread link but my I can’t find the solution of my problem. I already messed up with the bridge pivot screws, and now I can’t understand what should be the ideal height for them.
#10
Quote by stranger_23
Thanks for the thread link but my I can’t find the solution of my problem. I already messed up with the bridge pivot screws, and now I can’t understand what should be the ideal height for them.


The ideal height will depend mostly on your own preferences for string action. If you think your strings are too high off the fretboard, tighten (lower) the posts. If you think the strings are too low, loosen (raise) the posts.

A note though, I don't know too much about that particular tremolo unit, but it's generally not advised to adjust the pivot posts when the guitar is tuned up to full tension. It adds quite a bit of stress to them, and adjusting them in that situation can cause excessive wear on the knife edges.
#11
Quote by Confuse-a-Cat
The ideal height will depend mostly on your own preferences for string action. If you think your strings are too high off the fretboard, tighten (lower) the posts. If you think the strings are too low, loosen (raise) the posts.

A note though, I don't know too much about that particular tremolo unit, but it's generally not advised to adjust the pivot posts when the guitar is tuned up to full tension. It adds quite a bit of stress to them, and adjusting them in that situation can cause excessive wear on the knife edges.


+1
#12
ok then look to the Floyd thread, right next to it in the EG page.

you need to adjust the tension of the strings vs. the springs (in the back cavity) to find balance for that bridge.

the answer are there, but like said, certainly Don't mess with the
front bridge pivot screws with the guitar under tension.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011