#1
Hello, I know this is probably a pretty obvious "inexperienced" kind of question (been playing acoustic for nearly two years, but just 4 months on electric so I still have a lot of basics to grasp), but I haven't really had a chance to experiment with this, so...

I'm aware my amp is not the most awesome amp around (Marshall MG15, even though it still sounds fine for a lot of things), and the question is if it's normal that when I play lead or solos while rapidly moving between strings with the gain set any higher than "nice overdrive" (pedals, not using the amp distortion as it sounds pretty bad on my guitar), there's quite a lot of unwanted noise and if I don't mute the strings with my right hand a bit it basically sounds like a mess.

Quite obviously, I'm aware metal bands don't exactly play solos with a slight overdrive but it sounds clear nevertheless - so my question is:

Is it simply the question of the amp being not very great and should go away once I get a better amp, or it's a normal thing and I just need to take the noise into account when playing with more gain?
#2
It's your technique and muting. You need to improve to the point where those noises aren't an issue. Right and left hand muting is what you need to work on.

Also, a noise gate might help but it ultimately sounds like you need to work on muting. There's lots of videos on YouTube.
#3
Does your guitar have single coil pickups?
If so, you're going to hear more noise with more gain. Even more so if you're using a dirty, ungrounded power source.
Those metal solos you're talking about are all(99.99%) recorded with guitars that have humbucking(hum cancelling) pickups.
If things things aren't the issue then what Mephaphil says is next. Muting technique.
#4
No, actually quite the opposite, they're active humbuckers

I'm wondering about things like sweep picking for example, though - never even tried my hand at it yet, but I can imagine it must be quite difficult to mute the strings while doing that? A few other things come to my mind but this was one of the main examples why I was thinking the amount of noise is not normal.

Either way, this kind of answers my doubt - I'll just work on it and practice more with higher gain on. Thanks
#5
With high gain, if you're not playing, you will hear a lot of noise (if you want to make a silence, turn the knob). When playing, the noise should be drowned if you're playing correctly. Basically you want to reduce the vibrations as much as possible.

Vibrations -> Sound

With high gain settings, the unwanted sound will be much amplified.
#7
Quote by MattyPS
With high gain, if you're not playing, you will hear a lot of noise (if you want to make a silence, turn the knob). When playing, the noise should be drowned if you're playing correctly. Basically you want to reduce the vibrations as much as possible.

Vibrations -> Sound

With high gain settings, the unwanted sound will be much amplified.

Yeah I know, that's basically the issue - with a low/moderate gain the noise from other strings is generally barely audible, while with a higher gain it can interfere quite heavily with what I'm actually playing if I'm not muting the strings. I pretty much only started properly trying any solos or lead playing on a higher gain setting quite recently, I had mostly played rhythm only with higher gain, so I guess it's just a matter of practice - it's already a lot better though, muting the strings doesn't slow me down so much anymore.

I just wasn't sure if this is necessary or if it's a matter of equipment - sorry if the question feels dumb...