#1
Okay, so I'm trying to start my teaching career but the venue I want to teach at has a noise policy, and electrics just tend to be very audible even on low settings. I thought about investing in a Jam Hub, which would allow the ideal conditions for silent practice. However I don't have 300 dollars just laying around. Does anyone know of any other devices under the 50 dollar range that I can use to give two people a mix of two guitars. For your information, both amps have output jacks for headphones that silence them. I just need a way for both the student and I to be able to hear both guitars at the same time. Any advice is appreciated.
#2
M8 if you don't learn to play loud then you will never play loud n that is wut gitars about. go somwhere they let you play loud.
#3
I'm already a seasoned guitarist. And actually what really makes you get better in my opinion is the ability to play what you play loud, without amplification. The Jam Hub would essentially let me play loud, and get the tone I want, but eliminate the speaker sound. It's a guitar lesson. Not a concert at a hall.
#4
Did you just delete the last thread so you can add the 'Help!' in the title on this one?
Yeah I saw that TS. And now I just pointed it out so now everyone knows so now you'll have to deal with that.

...
I dunno I'm just bored
And can't help.
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#5
I would just use two small practice amps turned down pretty low. For a lesson I think you should be playing quietly enough that you can talk comfortably and still be heard anyways.
#8
@Joshua, thanks you have been a big help. And yeah, I know I can turn them down, but the proprietors of the venue explicitly said no electric guitars. The natural tendency is to turn them up. So, I must eliminate all audible sound beyond headphones. They said acoustics are okay. But, sadly I specialize in electrics.
#9
I can't really think of anything for cheap

If you think a jam hub is the way to go then get it, no point in getting something that won't fulfill its job the way you want it to.

plus it'll pay for itself in a few guitar lessons

EDIT:

Quote by Mr.Bones
They said acoustics are okay. But, sadly I specialize in electrics.


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#10
@obsceneairwaves, yeah you have a really valid point there, I guess in some way I could borrow money to get it. I got laid off, so I don't have any funds coming in. Looks like I'm heading back to unemployment. Giving lessons would actually pay off the machine in two months. It's just that I have to spend money to make money. C'est la vie.
#11
Why would you give music lessons in a venue that has a noise policy? Why would you think you can give electric guitar lessons if they explicit prohibit them?
I wouldn't take "silent lessons" and can't think of anyone who would, so I'd take your whole plan back a step or two.

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#13
Quote by jthm_guitarist
Why would you give music lessons in a venue that has a noise policy? Why would you think you can give electric guitar lessons if they explicit prohibit them?
I wouldn't take "silent lessons" and can't think of anyone who would, so I'd take your whole plan back a step or two.


I actually agree with this, if I ever came to a lesson and was given headphones coming out of a box, I wouldn't be going back, and if they were advertised as such, I'd just find another teacher, as there are sure to be many in the area.
#14
used to use a zoom g1x sort of multi fx and run it through a small mixing desk like 5 channel one then run the output through a set of small logitec speakers. worked well wasnt to loud for teaching and best of all with the mixing desk you can turn who evers to loud up or down as needed stops you from pissing everyone else off to. hope that helps
#16
You can't teach out of your home? Even if you have a strict landlord or something, there shouldn't be a problem with have two practice amps on. I wouldn't take lessons from somewhere that didn't let me use an amp. All of the subtleties that you require to be able to help the person learn would be gone, and you'd probably have them end up with bad habits
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#17
Quote by Mr.Bones
And yeah, I know I can turn them down, but the proprietors of the venue explicitly said no electric guitars. The natural tendency is to turn them up. So, I must eliminate all audible sound beyond headphones. They said acoustics are okay. But, sadly I specialize in electrics.



Explicitly no electric guitars but they allow acoustic? I think this needs to be questioned more. Do they not know that electric guitars have volume control or did an electric guitar do bad things to them when they were children?


I don't understand why an electric guitar would be a big 'no no' but acoustic would be fine since an acoustic can loud as well. Either they are uneducated or they're biased.
When I was eleven I broke the patio window and my mother sued me... She's always been a very aggressive litigator.
#18
Based on the problems that you are already encountering and your posts in this thread, I would say that you're not clever enough to be teaching. If you can't even figure out this problem, how do you intend to solve a real problem when teaching?
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#19
You can have your electric guitar's amp on a lower volume than an acoustic while actually playing harder...

I think the proprietors of the venue are just the dumbz...
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#20
I don't believe you are ready to be teaching guitar if you're running into problems before you've even begun. You say this venue doesn't allow electric guitars and that they have a noise policy. However, acoustic guitars are capable of being much, much louder than an electric guitar turned down low on an amplifier, so that makes absolutely no sense whichever way you look at it.

It's important for a teacher to be able to hear every single nuance of a student's guitar playing, and that involves having the volume turned up quite a bit. Having your students wear headphones is not professional in a teaching environment, and potentially a health hazard. Nobody wants to wear headphones that many other people have been wearing and probably sweating in. Even if you clean them, the very idea is gross and as I said, unprofessional.

That said, you should either teach guitar out of your home, or rent an office space to set up a small teaching studio. I do not recommend going to people's homes to teach there unless they specifically ask for that, and even then, I am strongly against the idea.

Good luck!
#21
You think that playing without amplification makes you good? No, it means you can't spot your mistakes. You need to be able to hear yourself so that you can identify your errors and correct them.

Please rethink this attitude, it's seriously flawed.
#22
Quote by Mr.Bones
@Joshua, thanks you have been a big help. And yeah, I know I can turn them down, but the proprietors of the venue explicitly said no electric guitars. The natural tendency is to turn them up. So, I must eliminate all audible sound beyond headphones. They said acoustics are okay. But, sadly I specialize in electrics.

Lol, so you booked a room to teach electric guitar lesssons in a venue that specifically outlaws electric guitars.
#23
Quote by JackWhiteIsButts
Lol, so you booked a room to teach electric guitar lesssons in a venue that specifically outlaws electric guitars.

Not everywhere has a lot of options. & I doubt I would get lessons from someone teaching out of their home. Not very professional.

Don't really have much in the way of advice other than you probably shouldn't listen to anybody in this forum.
#24
Quote by Thrashtastic15
Not everywhere has a lot of options. & I doubt I would get lessons from someone teaching out of their home. Not very professional.

If there were so few options in the area then teaching out of your own or the student's home wouldn't be unprofessional because it would be your only local options and the demand is still going to be there for the services. Plus it'd be cheaper and that would probably be appealing to certain people as well.

Don't really have much in the way of advice other than you probably shouldn't listen to anybody in this forum.
Solid advice.
#25
Quote by Thrashtastic15
Don't really have much in the way of advice other than you probably shouldn't listen to anybody in this forum.


/paradox
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#26
Quote by theogonia777
/paradox

Initially had a wink to point that out, but it looked really odd so I took it out. That was intentional & I was aware. Just for the record.
#27
Quote by JackWhiteIsButts
If there were so few options in the area then teaching out of your own or the student's home wouldn't be unprofessional because it would be your only local options and the demand is still going to be there for the services. Plus it'd be cheaper and that would probably be appealing to certain people as well.

The biggest thing is professionalism. A lot of his students are likely going to be new to guitar and fairly young. You are selling yourself not only to them, but more importantly to the parents who are investing in the lessons for their child. Being in a legitimate space like TS is talking about is a very wise move as it naturally associates yourself with the credibility of the venue (especially in an area where options are limited in that respect).

There are pros for the other option. Convenience mainly. But you lose that aspect of professionalism and it will not necessarily be cheaper. TS incurs additional costs through gas money, will find it harder to advertise his services, and will have to invest more time into going to each location.

Also, just for my two cents. When I was a new player (before I had a teacher) my brother sort of mentored me and pointed me in the right direction. One of the things he did was tell my parents to get me an acoustic guitar rather an electric guitar first. It may not have had the same "cool factor" or anything silly like that, but it made me improve. I developed a lot more strength and dexterity in my fingers. If you can play something cleanly on an acoustic it will be a breeze to play it cleanly on an electric. From there you can learn the nuance. A lot easier when you have that initial ability.
#28
Quote by Thrashtastic15
The biggest thing is professionalism. A lot of his students are likely going to be new to guitar and fairly young. You are selling yourself not only to them, but more importantly to the parents who are investing in the lessons for their child. Being in a legitimate space like TS is talking about is a very wise move as it naturally associates yourself with the credibility of the venue (especially in an area where options are limited in that respect).

There are pros for the other option. Convenience mainly. But you lose that aspect of professionalism and it will not necessarily be cheaper. TS incurs additional costs through gas money, will find it harder to advertise his services, and will have to invest more time into going to each location.
The benefits conferred by working through the venue are totally mitigated in this instance because the venue has clearly stated that he cannot use it for his intended purposes. If there are no other feasible options it stands to reason that other instructors in the area also are not able to work out of venues thus putting them all on relatively even footing and will have to establish their "professionalism" in other ways.
#29
Quote by JackWhiteIsButts
The benefits conferred by working through the venue are totally mitigated in this instance because the venue has clearly stated that he cannot use it for his intended purposes. If there are no other feasible options it stands to reason that other instructors in the area also are not able to work out of venues thus putting them all on relatively even footing and will have to establish their "professionalism" in other ways.

or, perhaps, other teachers have simply come up with a solution (ex: headphones, the thing he was on about but can't afford) that TS has not.
#31
Quote by Thrashtastic15
or, perhaps, other teachers have simply come up with a solution (ex: headphones, the thing he was on about but can't afford) that TS has not.
Are you calling TS stupid? I take offense to that.
#32
Quote by Thrashtastic15
Not everywhere has a lot of options. & I doubt I would get lessons from someone teaching out of their home. Not very professional.

Don't really have much in the way of advice other than you probably shouldn't listen to anybody in this forum.


It's not professional to have a fully equipped studio in your home that's designed for professional use? Seems perfect to me.

My teacher has a great studio and as a professional myself, it seems completely professional.
#33
Quote by Mephaphil
as a professional myself, it seems completely professional.


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#35
I am with Mephaphil on that. Having a professional studio at your home is totally possible. it can be semi professional too (and will be, most likely) but then define professional. Either way, you can have all the professional stuff at your home, should it necessarily be a separate facility to house all the gear and whatnot?
Last edited by Vendetta V at Jan 14, 2014,