#1
I find after playing for a while my guitar neck really does quite sticky with the heat and sweat.

I know some guys sand their guitar necks down, but I'm intending to sell mine and upgrade, I won't be playing it until it dies.

If there anything that i can use to maybe wipe the neck with, to give it a really smooth non stick coating?
"I think the most important thing about music is the sense of escape." - Thom Yorke
#2
Well, clean the neck well first. Also you could try using baby powder on your fretting hand to prevent it from sweating so much.

Sanding the guitar to bare wood is bad idea, but you can make the neck slightly satin feeling with 1000 grit sandpaper or 0000 grade steel/polishing wool. They are so fine that it barely eats any of the finish away, but they do leave behind nice silky surface that your thumb glides on without resistance. The satin surface does wear off though.

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Jan 12, 2014,
#3
Quote by MaaZeus
Well, clean the neck well first. Also you could try using baby powder on your fretting hand to prevent it from sweating so much.

Sanding the guitar to bare wood is bad idea, but you can make the neck slightly satin feeling with 1000 grit sandpaper or 0000 grade steel/polishing wool. They are so fine that it barely eats any of the finish away, but they do leave behind nice silky surface that your thumb glides on without resistance. The satin surface does wear off though.

This is a very nice advice to give. +1

By the way, I've tried a 60 grit sandpaper on my Fender Jaguar HH that had a gloss urethane finish. I used extreme caution not to knock off the entire finish on the guitar neck. The back of the guitar neck is still shiny (in terms of reflecting visible light), but feels way smoother.

Just my personal experience to add onto the post. If anyone thinks a fine sandpaper (600+ grit) is more effective, by all means, go for it.
Hope this gave you my 2 cents.
#4
Quote by parhelia_0000
This is a very nice advice to give. +1

By the way, I've tried a 60 grit sandpaper on my Fender Jaguar HH that had a gloss urethane finish. I used extreme caution not to knock off the entire finish on the guitar neck. The back of the guitar neck is still shiny (in terms of reflecting visible light), but feels way smoother.

Just my personal experience to add onto the post. If anyone thinks a fine sandpaper (600+ grit) is more effective, by all means, go for it.
Hope this gave you my 2 cents.



The thought of using that coarse paper scares the shit out of me. I use that stuff to eat away and round corners on woodwork. Without care it eats away the finish fast. Though I guess the surface it leaves will propably last longer because the grooves are bigger.

I stick to wet sandpapers and polishing steelwools.

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Jan 12, 2014,
#5
Quote by MaaZeus
The thought of using that coarse paper scares the shit out of me. I use that stuff to eat away and round corners on woodwork. Without care it eats away the finish fast. Though I guess the surface it leaves will propably last longer because the grooves are bigger.

I stick to wet sandpapers and polishing steelwools.

I could only find that kind of sandpaper in my school, so I stuck to that. Good thing I used extreme caution, right?
#6
Quote by parhelia_0000
I could only find that kind of sandpaper in my school, so I stuck to that. Good thing I used extreme caution, right?



Yeah. But I personally wouldnt use it again. A sheet of fine grit wet sandpaper costs next to nothing in hardware stores and you only need a small piece of it to satin the neck, enough that you can wrap it around the neck with your palm and do few gentle swipes up and down.

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#7
Quote by parhelia_0000
This is a very nice advice to give. +1

By the way, I've tried a 60 grit sandpaper on my Fender Jaguar HH that had a gloss urethane finish. I used extreme caution not to knock off the entire finish on the guitar neck. The back of the guitar neck is still shiny (in terms of reflecting visible light), but feels way smoother.

Just my personal experience to add onto the post. If anyone thinks a fine sandpaper (600+ grit) is more effective, by all means, go for it.
Hope this gave you my 2 cents.


Fender Squier Jaguar HH? Asking cause I bought one like that off craigslist.
#8
Quote by 2PtDescartes
Fender Squier Jaguar HH? Asking cause I bought one like that off craigslist.

Nope, it's a genuine 2005 Japanese Fender Jaguar.
#9
0000 steel wool, works a treat.
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#10
Quote by constructbot
0000 steel wool, works a treat.



Yup. Even 000 will do. Just be mindful of the steeldust it drops, you dont want it in your pickups.

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#11
I'd rather use a scotch brite pad than steel wool because it's far less messy and it does the job just as well. You'll probably find one under your kitchen sink- it's those green abrasive pads your mum uses to scrape off burn-on food. Obviously use a clean one.

A lot of automotive painters like to use them before applying a coat of paint to a finish because they leave very fine scratches in the finish for the following paint coat to adhere to. It's those scratches that'll satin the neck.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 12, 2014,
#12
Quote by MaaZeus
Yeah. But I personally wouldnt use it again. A sheet of fine grit wet sandpaper costs next to nothing in hardware stores and you only need a small piece of it to satin the neck, enough that you can wrap it around the neck with your palm and do few gentle swipes up and down.

How do you know when the finish is completely off by the way? My guitar neck still reflects visible light but has no more gloss on it (and feels way smoother).
#13
Quote by parhelia_0000
How do you know when the finish is completely off by the way? My guitar neck still reflects visible light but has no more gloss on it (and feels way smoother).



When it starts to feel like wood instead of lacquer. That is, when its completely off. Its impossible to not notice it. But if there are scratches that go all the way to the wood but otherwise its still mostly lacquer, I'm not sure how to spot them.

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Jan 12, 2014,
#14
Quote by MaaZeus
When it starts to feel like wood instead of lacquer. That is, when its completely off. Its impossible to not notice it. But if there are scratches that go all the way to the wood but otherwise its still mostly lacquer, I'm not sure how to spot them.

There are some minor scratches on my guitar neck where I sanded them but it's not so deep as I would think. I also left out the edges of the guitar neck to preserve the fretboard and the headstock. Any issues from that?
#15
Quote by parhelia_0000
There are some minor scratches on my guitar neck where I sanded them but it's not so deep as I would think. I also left out the edges of the guitar neck to preserve the fretboard and the headstock. Any issues from that?


No. Actually its a good idea to use something like painters tape to to border the area you want satin and there is no point in touching the fingerboard. Also it looks much more professional in, for example, painted necks where the satin is very visible. Carefully lined satin area where your thumb glides but rest is left glossy which is something some guitars have from factory by the way. Just buffing wildly looks terrible on painted necks. Here is a good example on how to do it right.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxGz6IZ9BFI

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Jan 12, 2014,
#16
Quote by MaaZeus
No. Actually its a good idea to use something like painters tape to to border the area you want satin. Looks much more professional in, for example, painted necks. Carefully lined satin area where your thumb glides but rest is left glossy. Just buffing wildly looks terrible on those necks. Here is a good example.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxGz6IZ9BFI

So my guitar neck is safe then huh...for now...
Good thing I left the edges glossy. I also left one end of the guitar neck to protect the serial number from being damaged. Thanks for your help.
#17
Why is it bad to sand the lacquer off completely? I used 600 grit wet and dry paper 2 yrs ago on my Jackson and its fine.
#18
Quote by dazza027
Why is it bad to sand the lacquer off completely? I used 600 grit wet and dry paper 2 yrs ago on my Jackson and its fine.

Wood needs lacquer to protect it from moisture damage.
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#19
I sanded all the finish off my Tele's neck and refinished it with Tru Oil, which is usually used for gun stocks. Feels great, and haven't noticed any adverse effects after 3ish years. The Scotchbrite pad works great for a temporary fix, too (you can polish it back to gloss if you want).
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#20
Yeah Id have thought that the natural oils of your skin and in the wood itself would help with 'protection'. I think I need to google what you mean about moisture damage because Ive never come across it.

Edit, theres a bunch about guitars drying out, but stuff all about moisture, more to do with actual water and debonding and warping of necks and fretboards.
Last edited by dazza027 at Jan 13, 2014,