#1
Is there anyone into writing djent style music? I cant seem to find a whole lot of djent stuff on this website which is disappointing considering the genre is unbelievably amazing and is getting pretty popular. I'd like to see more djent stuff in the forums or in lessons to share opinions and skills on writing/playing djent with people.
#2
(preface: I think this might be better suited for the Music Theory board)

I dabble in djent from time to time, so maybe I can offer some advice. First, listen to and learn as much djent and Meshuggah as you can. All the advice in the world won't help if you don't have something to reference it against.

Second, research polymeter, that's a lot of where the rhythmic sound of djent comes from. Polymeter is where two different time signatures are played at the same time. Like take New Groove by Periphery for example. That main riff is played in 7/8 while the cymbals and snare play in 4/4. They keep on doing this for 4 bars, where by this point the 7/8 riff has been played 4 times at which point the guitars add in a 2 quarter note (2/4) riff to act as a fill to "catch up" to the main 4/4 pulse of the song. Bands like to add that ambient clean guitar sound on top because that can also help accent the 4/4 feel since they're just playing straight quarter notes. But sometimes polymeter isn't used, sometimes bands just end up playing in odd time signatures/combinations of time signatures. Looking at GuitarPro tabs can help you see what is going on with this.

Third, research accents and syncopation. A lot of what djent bands do is accent the 16th notes in a song. A beat broken down into 16th notes can be represented with words: "1 - e - and - a." So while more traditional songs tend to accent the "1" or the "and", I find that djent bands tend to accent the "e" or the "a" as well. A common rhythm for this is a run of 2, 4, or other even number of 16th notes which causes you to end on an upstroke.

Fourth, palm mute those low notes. A common technique (but I'm seeing less of this sound nowadays) to get the "djent" tone is to do a palm mute of a drop tuned power chord, like 0002XX. That gets you a fuller sound, and moving your palm a bit up the bridge helps get that scratchy staccato sound. Misha Mansoor has some videos he did for some guitar magazine called "The Djent Set" that can help explain this better.

Finally, realize these aren't rules to adhere to. Play around with this stuff, see if you can incorporate it into your sound, but don't force it. Just try to lock into a good groove and after a while you'll be set. I view the djent sound as more a tool to be used in a song, like galloping triplets, not something you should aim to base a whole song around. You don't have to palm mute the lowest string of an 8 string to sound "djent."

Hope this helps! I recently went through a phase of trying to "get" djent as well.