#1
Electric and bass guitar is so easy these days with direct recording, but a traditional acoustic still requires a traditional mic and recording environment. The problem is that you end up with two very different approaches for guitar recording.

How common is it to add a pickup to an acoustic for the sake of direct recording these days, as opposed to playing into a mic?

I'm finally getting close to laying down some tracks for an electric/acoustic project and I want to do things as by-the-book as possible as a learning experience. Whichever approach is most common is the one I'd like to embrace.

Thanks!
#2
From what I gather on Youtube, it's all up to personal preference... I see guys who use 2 mics (at soundhole and neck) to mic their acoustic, then I see guys who use an AE, then there's guys who just use a single mic.

I have both an acoustic electric and a more expensive, traditional, non electric and I've used both an input and a mic to record my acoustics. Both ways work for me (but I'm no professional)...
#3
When making a fully-produced recording, I will use one mic and one DI blend from an acoustic guitar. Then I pan them apart a bit, sounds pretty big, if that's what you're going for. If you're not going for big, then using one or the other is fine. Sometimes I end up completely dropping out one of the two tracks if I need to acoustic to sit further back in the mix, especially if it's playing more of a percussive role.

I just installed an LR Baggs Lyrics system in my new acoustic because I need it for gigging, it's actually a small condenser mic inside the guitar. It sounds INCREDIBLE. I'll be using it for lots of direct blending in the future as well.

Quote by adrienfr
Whichever approach is most common is the one I'd like to embrace.

Whichever approach sounds better is the one you should embrace. It won't always be the same approach every time, either. Depends on the song, the guitar, the room, etc. but mostly the song. Use your ears!

Take the time to capture the guitar a few different ways and pick what works best. Capture it from 3 different mics and a DI blend if you want, then mix and match until you find the right combo.
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Last edited by Sid McCall at Jan 13, 2014,
#4
Quote by Sid McCall
Whichever approach sounds better is the one you should embrace. It won't always be the same approach every time, either. Depends on the song, the guitar, the room, etc. but mostly the song. Use your ears!
Amen to that.
Try different spots to put the microphones in, and then choose whatever suits your needs best.

My go to approach (with my classical guitar and my mics) is a mic at 5 to 10cm from the 12th fret a bit pointed towards the soundhole, together with a mic pointing at the soundhole from the back of the guitar.

You may want to directly point a mic towards the soundhole (mind the booming bass) or to the bridge or to the nut, again, whatever suits your needs.
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