#1
I'm new to guitar, but I'm learning a great deal as time passes. I was learning a Tab and it was told to me that it was in the Key of E, but the main 4 chords seemed to be A B C#m B.

It got me wondering what is the Key of C vs the Key of E as it concerns guitars. What would be an example of a chord or chord arrangement when something is in the key of C vs E? If you have A B C#m B, what makes this Key of E?

Thanks, I could use help understanding this.
#2
The key of E major has E F# G# A B C# D#, which your A, C#m and two B's all fit into, the key of C major is really quite easy to remember, it contains the notes C, D, E, F, G, A and B, it's the C#m in the progression that doesn't fit in with the C key and so makes the chord progression in the key of E.


I would really suggest looking in the music theory columns and lessons on this site or on youtube for an introduction to keys.
#3
Quote by MistaChy
I'm new to guitar, but I'm learning a great deal as time passes. I was learning a Tab and it was told to me that it was in the Key of E, but the main 4 chords seemed to be A B C#m B.

It got me wondering what is the Key of C vs the Key of E as it concerns guitars. What would be an example of a chord or chord arrangement when something is in the key of C vs E? If you have A B C#m B, what makes this Key of E?

Thanks, I could use help understanding this.


Think of the Key of a song or section of music as having two parts:

1) a tonal center, which is the central sound (note) of the piece. It is the note that sounds and 'feels' most like 'home base' Think: resolution

2) a 'tonality' or 'mood' as in major or minor. Those that have studied music a while see Major and Minor as being subdivided by three major modes and three minor modes, but that is a different study in itself

If the song you are looking at sounds RESOLVED on the E chord, then it is indeed in the key of E major, but if it doesn't use E and only A B C#m B are used, chances are that one of them sounds more resolved. Is it the A? or the C#m? then one of those are your key.

First step to understanding is to learn the pattern of the major scale, and if possible, memorize the 15 theoretically possible major keys. this leads to understanding their related minor keys, then the triads that are built on each degree. Bottom line, though, is to use your ear and always listen for RESOLUTION. Music theory and ear go hand in hand

There are excellent lessons right here on UG. Good luck!
#4
Quote by P_Trik
Think of the Key of a song or section of music as having two parts:

1) a tonal center, which is the central sound (note) of the piece. It is the note that sounds and 'feels' most like 'home base' Think: resolution

2) a 'tonality' or 'mood' as in major or minor. Those that have studied music a while see Major and Minor as being subdivided by three major modes and three minor modes, but that is a different study in itself

If the song you are looking at sounds RESOLVED on the E chord, then it is indeed in the key of E major, but if it doesn't use E and only A B C#m B are used, chances are that one of them sounds more resolved. Is it the A? or the C#m? then one of those are your key.

First step to understanding is to learn the pattern of the major scale, and if possible, memorize the 15 theoretically possible major keys. this leads to understanding their related minor keys, then the triads that are built on each degree. Bottom line, though, is to use your ear and always listen for RESOLUTION. Music theory and ear go hand in hand

There are excellent lessons right here on UG. Good luck!


If this was facebook, I would put a "like" tag on this comment. Thanks so much.
#5
It's just the pitch of the scale.

Have you listen to entire CD or albums? If all the songs are in the same key it gets boring.
Playing in different key allows the listener to have some sort of contras.
It's the same with tempo.

Lets say you have a cool song going at 140 bpm and another at 120 bpm.
Youre better off arranging the song with 120 bmp before the 140. Other wise
the song with 120 before the 140...the song with 120 will feel
like it's dragging....
Or you can put a song with 90 bpm between them. To give it better contrass.
it'll set up the song with 120 bpm better. If you have another song with 120bpm.
If you write it in a different key. It'll give it contras.
#6
And modes (P_Trik mentioned in his post) are actually really easy to learn as well. You just make some changes to minor and minor scales. For example Lydian, that is a major mode is just your normal major scale, but you raise the fourth note by half a step. Once you've learned major and minor scales, it's a good idea to study modes.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Jan 14, 2014,