#1
I'm trying to learn how to play a bit faster and more impressive stuff as I am trying to stray away a bit from my bluesy roots. Where did you guys learn to play fast?
#2
i father brought me home a half stack head oneday. It had narely built in destrotions and reverb. Then the next week he camehome from a garage sale with grips of cry babies,
morly wha with added puched to it. He also build me a kickbutt tube screamer. :P

That man was crazy..he told me I should learn how to play clean...WTF???
Thats after he install hot demorzio pick up on my guitar for me.
It's just to keep me away from his gold top les pual.lmao

He also bought me some Randy Rhode, Ynywie and Jeff Beck licks books.
I basicslly listened to a lot of metal. Natraully I wanna play what I listen to.
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 14, 2014,
#3
Myself. I've never had a guitar teacher in my life.
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#5
I learned to play metal after playing acoustic for a year, i believe this is 5 years ago or something. I started learning songs by Metallica and Iron Maiden, and went from there.

Sadly, i've never had a proper teacher so later on i had to go back and correct problems with my technique, cause i hurt myself after 2 years of playing.

From there on it was just learning alot of songs and practicing slowly, i wish i had started working on my ears back then but that came later.

That being said, i left metal about 3 years ago. I am much more interested in afro-music (jazz, blues, funk, fusion etc), and the fact that almost all the people in the music scene (in particular the metal scene) where i live are very close-minded didn't help either.

To answer your question though, if you want to learn metal just learn metal, but don't do it with the focus on speed. Focus on playing everything cleanly and accurately and relaxed, nobody is going to care if you can play fast if you can't do those 3 things.

Practicing with a clean tone is great, cause then you hear all the dynamics and how it sounds when you attack the string, then you add distortion and just work on muting the extra noise. The worst thing i know is hearing players who have only practiced with distortion, when they switch to a clean tone they have no force in their picking at all, they have just been relying on the slight compression from the distortion.

Hope that helps.
Best Regards
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#6
Since my father was a musican. He sings and plays verity of instruments.
I was surrounded by music my entire life. There wasnt shortage of music
books. He nevered wanted me to use tabs.

My father never gave me guitar lessons other than to show me how to play
some folk songs. I also had music since grade school. So it was easier for
me to comprehend major scales or complete scales. I was going the opposite
as you. I wanted to learn the blues becuase it's the foundation of rock music.

I didnt always played dirty. I was the guitar player in our HS jazz band and marching band.
The music sheets for guitars given to me only gave me chord's names.lol
It didnt showed me how to strum it or how to make those chords.
So i had to learn alot of plucking patterns and strumming patterns on my own by listening
to it.lol Anyways, I was more familar with arppgeios and chords.

Bascailly that's all the modes or exotics scales to me are. They're just chords to me.
Instead of plcuking them with my fingers. Im picking them with a pick.
Pretty much add in missing notes thats not in the arpegios. I tend to play
around the arppegios lots.

Plus I played lots of mattalica songs from kill them all. It has alot of down plum mute
picking. Well...When i learn solo, if I do up and down picking I'll get twice as many notes.lol

The reason why I needed or wanted destortions was mostly for sustain.
I do a lots of legato playing too. The speed is more in my fretboard hand.
The actions on my guitar needed to be set low becuase of that.
I also use super slinky strings becuase of that...until the strength on my fretboard hand
got stronger. Plus Im one of those people that get very picky in the type
of guitar necks. The shape, frets...ect
24 frets...and cut away that'll allow me access to the higher notes.
So the back of the body of the guitar has to be shape a certain way
if it's a bolt on neck.

As Sick said...becareful becuase I too damnage my hand from playing too fast.
From doing sweeping trying to do too damn fast with stretches.
It's been 2 years. I didnt know if i was going to be able to play the guitar again.
My hand went numb after 10-15 mins even if i just play simple chords.

Before I damaged my hand I was actaully learning how to play blues without
using a pick. You're only going to get that sound or be able to play certain
riffs by doing that.
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 15, 2014,
#7
^^ cool story bro.

Anyways OP, most metal is just speed blues. Metal is just a general term anyway, so if you are asking how to play fast... the answer is play slow and correct for a few years, but as you become more dexterous, gradually pick up the pace.

I am sure if you were timed on how fast you can tie your tennis shoes, you can do it much faster now than when you were like 4 and were still learning. Same concept with guitar, except guitar is more technically difficult and the learning curve is steeper.

That is all there is to it.
#8
There's a lot of different types of metal, a lot of different styles, if the question was more about learning metal, I'd ask about what sort of metal it is you wanted to play.

Answering your question though, I learnt to play metal(fast) originally by building up my downpicking ability, and working on stability for alternate picking (for both; start off slow, use a circular motion and try to keep it as tight-but not tense; as you can,)

I started off learning classic metallica songs; Metallica songs aren't generally that hard to play, if you're more at home with blues, I'd say start with something like Seek and Destroy, For whom the bell tolls is nice and easy, No remorse is another good metallica song to help you get into it, Megadeth's Peace Sells, Sabbath stuff like Iron Man, Children of the grave, Symptom of the universe (I could go on infinitely but these are just the early tracks I learnt that are quite easy and useful to get into)

I then learnt to play triplets, gallops and stuff, started playing more difficult stuff like Maiden, megadeth, Slayer, faster metallica tracks and whatever I really fancied at that point

Get a solid body with hummers, crank up the distortion, put up your bass and trebles and lower your mids to get that heavy metal rhythm sound (there's always discussions and opinions on tone, so please experiment, but this is the place to start)

I don't agree that that you should necessarily take years to speed up, you already play so I'll assume you have some technique, muscle memory and general ability, ofcourse you should always play correctly (never sacrifice technique or accuracy for speed) at a speed where you're comfortable, but that should always be the fastest speed where you can meet that criteria, there's absolutely no point playing slower than you have to, if you can play it *perfectly* well and comfortably, at a faster speed.

So my advice is find the fastest speed where you can play, with perfect technique, accuracy, rhythm and comfort (USE A METRONOME) and practice that until it basically becomes second nature and gradually increase the speed if and when you can play at the same perfect level, at a higher speed.

We all take different amounts of time, some might take a day or two to progress a bit with speed, some might take a couple weeks, but it will happen.
#9
Quote by Merciless Tengo
There's a lot of different types of metal, a lot of different styles, if the question was more about learning metal, I'd ask about what sort of metal it is you wanted to play.

Answering your question though, I learnt to play metal(fast) originally by building up my downpicking ability, and working on stability for alternate picking (for both; start off slow, use a circular motion and try to keep it as tight-but not tense; as you can,)

I started off learning classic metallica songs; Metallica songs aren't generally that hard to play, if you're more at home with blues, I'd say start with something like Seek and Destroy, For whom the bell tolls is nice and easy, No remorse is another good metallica song to help you get into it, Megadeth's Peace Sells, Sabbath stuff like Iron Man, Children of the grave, Symptom of the universe (I could go on infinitely but these are just the early tracks I learnt that are quite easy and useful to get into)

I then learnt to play triplets, gallops and stuff, started playing more difficult stuff like Maiden, megadeth, Slayer, faster metallica tracks and whatever I really fancied at that point

Get a solid body with hummers, crank up the distortion, put up your bass and trebles and lower your mids to get that heavy metal rhythm sound (there's always discussions and opinions on tone, so please experiment, but this is the place to start)

I don't agree that that you should necessarily take years to speed up, you already play so I'll assume you have some technique, muscle memory and general ability, ofcourse you should always play correctly (never sacrifice technique or accuracy for speed) at a speed where you're comfortable, but that should always be the fastest speed where you can meet that criteria, there's absolutely no point playing slower than you have to, if you can play it *perfectly* well and comfortably, at a faster speed.

So my advice is find the fastest speed where you can play, with perfect technique, accuracy, rhythm and comfort (USE A METRONOME) and practice that until it basically becomes second nature and gradually increase the speed if and when you can play at the same perfect level, at a higher speed.

We all take different amounts of time, some might take a day or two to progress a bit with speed, some might take a couple weeks, but it will happen.

If you play slower than your maximum speed, you can focus on your mistakes a lot easier. Of course there's no point in playing at 40bpm. But for example if your maximum accurate speed is, let's say, 120bpm, practicing the song at 100bpm may be reasonable because focusing on your mistakes and tension and that kind of stuff is a lot easier. Playing fast is all about being relaxed and moving your hands as little as possible. And if you can play it at slower tempo, it is easier to play it at faster tempo. Also, slower tempo makes it easier to actually figure out what you are playing (for example difficult rhythms that you aren't 100% sure of - but when you slow it down, it's easier to figure out how to play the rhythm) - many times you can't play a song because you aren't completely sure how the rhythm goes and what notes to play. Playing slower also makes your fingers remember the song better. You have more time to think what to play next. When you play at your max speed, you don't have that much time to think about it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jan 18, 2014,
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Of course there's no point in playing at 40bpm.

Bull. Fucking. Shit.

That is all.
Join the 7 String Legion!

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.

Messiaen is Magical


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#11
Quote by Mister A.J.
Bull. Fucking. Shit.

That is all.

My point was, if the song is originally at 160bpm and you need to play it at 40bpm, maybe you should learn some other song. I wouldn't drop the tempo so much. I think it's best to practice at a tempo you are completely comfortable with that is not too slow. I mean, if the original tempo was 160bpm and your maximum comfortable speed was 120bpm, it would be reasonable to drop the tempo to 90-100bpm but not much below that. 40bpm would be super slow and would just make you frustrated.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115