#1
what is the best way for me to warm up. I have tried stretching but that has just made my fingers more tense (turns out that its bad to stretch before exertion). Is there any dynamic warm ups.
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#2
I tend to turn the heat up in my apartment.


but srs I do some simple picking exercises followed by fretting exercises. all in all it takes about 10-15 minutes.
#3
Quote by eric_wearing
what is the best way for me to warm up. I have tried stretching but that has just made my fingers more tense (turns out that its bad to stretch before exertion). Is there any dynamic warm ups.



Just play.
#4
I just run chromatic exercises up and down individual strings and across the fretboard.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
I usually do a warm up/exercise routine ~45 minutes. Right hand only, left hand only, scales, and chart reading.

For a quick warm up I do scales from quarter notes to sextuplets, takes 10-15 minutes. All the way up and back down on quarter notes, then again with 8ths, triplets, etc.

Quote by macashmack
I tend to turn the heat up in my apartment.

I hate practicing in cold rooms. Sometimes I can play for hours and my hands won't feel completely warmed up. Good litmus test for technique, though.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jan 15, 2014,
#6
I just do some simple chromatic things, and then maybe go through a scale or two. Probably takes me like ten minutes at most... Really should depend on how intensive of a session you are setting out to do. You warm up different for a sprint than a marathon. Not much warm up for A Horse With No Name compared to playing through all of Metropolis Part 2. (I'd kill to be able to through that CD).
#7
It really depends on what you are warming up for....If I am going to play a show, jam a little or even just learn something new, I usually start with stretches, chord drills and chromatic scales.

You never want to over play for a gig otherwise you just exhausted yourself before actually doing anything.
"Is all that we see or seem, but a dream within a dream?"
#9
I find that a lot of people tend to over think the warm up thing. You'll get warmed up simply by playing. You just need to use common sense to determine where to start off. For example, starting off with the most intense and fast thing you can think off, at full speed, would be ignoring (or not having) common sense.

I would suggest that moving your fingers around in a way that is inconsistent with what you'd actually be doing while playing music is a waste of time, and not necessarily very effective. You're better just playing music (or at least musically) That way you encounter all of the relevant movements…. bends, vibrato, slide, strumming, picking, hammer ons, pull offs, Chords, scales, chromatics…… It's all in there anyway so why waste time being unmusical?
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 16, 2014,
#10
i just play what i have to learn slowly and relaxed. scalar/chromatic warmup exercises are a waste of time and energy imo. i guess it depends what you play, you might need a lot of warmup if you play ultra technical and difficult classical guitar pieces
Last edited by SuperKid at Jan 16, 2014,
#11
jumping jacks, pushups, burpees

get the blood flowing
Quote by The Spoon
Unless you're sure she likes you, telling her you like her has a 110% chance of failing.

But hey, at least you have a 10% chance of absolutely guaranteeing failure.
#12
Quote by SuperKid
i just play what i have to learn slowly and relaxed. scalar/chromatic warmup exercises are a waste of time and energy imo. i guess it depends what you play, you might need a lot of warmup if you play ultra technical and difficult classical guitar pieces


I find scale/arpeggio warm ups pretty useful, actually. You're never going to play chromatic "warm up" lines in actual music, so why not warm up on the actual musical patterns you'll be playing?

Gets two birds with one stone - gets your hands warmed up and you'll never have to spend time just practicing scales