#1
I am playing from the last 2 years now. I am a novice in guitar theory.
I want to know that, the positions of the notes is fixed on the fret board right?
Like e note can be played on the open 6th string, 12 fret 6th string, 2 fret 4th string etc.
If it is like this, then why cant I play the e note on anywhere on the fret board.
Like 3rd fret 6th string? And then I will adjust the notes ahead of it like every note
On the string will go up 3 frets. If I can do this then why do we have these fixed positions
Of the notes. Please help me. Thanks.
#2
There is no guitar theory. It's music theory.
I don't understand what you're asking. Every fret on the fretboard is a certain note. 3rd fret of the 6th string is a G.
#4
Yeah I'm sorry @macashmack I meant music theory. I want to ask that for example let me call the 3 fret 6 string e note. So if I play that and then I play notes ahead of it like then 4th fret will become f then 5th will be f#. Why cant I do like this? This way I can vary the sound of the note. I mean why can't i play a song which starts basically on the 5th fret 6 string ON: 3rd fret 6 string?
#5
you can. just don't play it with a band, because it's going to sound awful.

but musicians do that all the time. it's called transposition. except you're not playing in E anymore. now you're playing in G. so if everyone else is playing in E and you decide to play in G you're likely not going to get a very good sound.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
Quote by mueedbilal
Yeah I'm sorry @macashmack I meant music theory. I want to ask that for example let me call the 3 fret 6 string e note. So if I play that and then I play notes ahead of it like then 4th fret will become f then 5th will be f#. Why cant I do like this? This way I can vary the sound of the note. I mean why can't i play a song which starts basically on the 5th fret 6 string ON: 3rd fret 6 string?

Oh you mean transposing the key. That's fine, but it doesn't change the names of the notes on the fretboard or the intervals that the songs has. It just changes the key, which is pretty common if the singer or w.e. can't sing the full range in one key but can in another or w.e.
#7
Yeah I want to know that. But for example I'm playing the notes E, F and G on the 6th string. And I move to 3rd fret same string then it will become G, A and B right? But in the first case I was using E, F and they are in line. But when I will use G, A they are one fret apart. This means I'm re arranging. Firstly it was 1 fret and then 2, but now its 3 fret then gap of 4th fret and then 5th fret right? This changes the sound
Last edited by mueedbilal at Jan 16, 2014,
#8
Quote by macashmack
Oh you mean transposing the key. That's fine, but it doesn't change the names of the notes on the fretboard or the intervals that the songs has. It just changes the key, which is pretty common if the singer or w.e. can't sing the full range in one key but can in another or w.e.



Did you got it??
#9
Quote by mueedbilal
Yeah I want to know that. But for example I'm playing the notes E, F and G on the 6th string. And I move to 3rd fret same string then it will become G, A and B right? But in the first case I was using E, F and they are in line. But when I will use G, A they are one fret apart. This means I'm re arranging. Firstly it was 1 fret and then 2, but now its 3 fret then gap of 4th fret and then 5th fret right? This changes the sound


It will become G, Ab and Bb, because E doesn't have a sharp and F doesn't have a flat. If you were to play G, A and B, the intervals would be different from E, F and G, so the tune wouldn't sound the same at all.
#10
Quote by mueedbilal
Yeah I want to know that. But for example I'm playing the notes E, F and G on the 6th string. And I move to 3rd fret same string then it will become G, A and B right? But in the first case I was using E, F and they are in line. But when I will use G, A they are one fret apart. This means I'm re arranging. Firstly it was 1 fret and then 2, but now its 3 fret then gap of 4th fret and then 5th fret right? This changes the sound

You're changing the interval. The interval between E and F is a semi tone, or a half step, and the interval between a G and an A is a whole step. If you want it to be the same but starting on the 3rd fret rather than the open string just imagine the open string is its own fret, and just "slide" that position up to the third fret.
On the guitar, whole steps are two frets away from each other on one string. half steps are one fret distance.

You should learn the order of the notes:

A - A#/Bb - B - C - C#/Db - D - D#/Eb - E - F - F#/Gb - G - G#/Ab - back to A, and it loops around again.

Every note is one semitone from the note directly to its right or left.
Last edited by macashmack at Jan 16, 2014,
#11
Quote by CelestialGuitar
It will become G, Ab and Bb, because E doesn't have a sharp and F doesn't have a flat. If you were to play G, A and B, the intervals would be different from E, F and G, so the tune wouldn't sound the same at all.



Oh I see, this means that I just have to go the number of frets I want and the positions will be same. Just the notes will be different right?
#12
If the note you're supposed to play is an E... and you instead play 3 frets up from the E and just call it E.... and you move every note up 3 frets the same way, yes it will still sound like the same song, except in a higher key. As long as you aren't playing with anybody who is playing the song in the original key it will be fine. This is the same thing as using a Capo on your guitar neck and playing the chords of a song to raise the key....
#13
Quote by mueedbilal
Oh I see, this means that I just have to go the number of frets I want and the positions will be same. Just the notes will be different right?

Yes.
#14
Quote by macashmack
You're changing the interval. The interval between E and F is a semi tone, or a half step, and the interval between a G and an A is a whole step. If you want it to be the same but starting on the 3rd fret rather than the open string just imagine the open string is its own fret, and just "slide" that position up to the third fret.
On the guitar, whole steps are two frets away from each other on one string. half steps are one fret distance.

You should learn the order of the notes:

A - A#/Bb - B - C - C#/Db - D - D#/Eb - E - F - F#/Gb - G - G#/Ab - back to A, and it loops around again.

Every note is one semitone from the note directly to its right or left.



I know about the notes. I was in the misconception that I have to go according to the natural notes like if its E,F,G then it will become G,A,B. Thanks alot bro. It helped me.
#15
Quote by jdport
If the note you're supposed to play is an E... and you instead play 3 frets up from the E and just call it E.... and you move every note up 3 frets the same way, yes it will still sound like the same song, except in a higher key. As long as you aren't playing with anybody who is playing the song in the original key it will be fine. This is the same thing as using a Capo on your guitar neck and playing the chords of a song to raise the key....



But the 3 frets high will not be an E note right? It will G. Correct me if I'm wrong. Thanks btw.
#16
Quote by mueedbilal
But the 3 frets high will not be an E note right? It will G. Correct me if I'm wrong. Thanks btw.

You are not wrong.

Memorize this:

#17
You have it right...

Just remember the diatonic interval from the key of C first. Just like all the white keys on the piano. Thats the first note most poeple are taught to find first on the piano.
No sharps or flats....Forget about those sharps or flats..

There's a pattern....1 string down and 7 fret. excluding the B string.
On the B string the E note is on the 5th.

If you go to A string 7th fret. It'll be the same patterns as you see near the nut or open
possition. It's just one string down

or 1 string up, every 5 frets. You remember that from tunning.

So it's not really that hard once you break the neck in 1/4 sections.
Learn it from the nut up to the 5th fret. Everything just repeats itself again.

Once you remember everything the key of C. It's just a matter of sliding
those entire patterns up and down the neck to play in different keys.
Some people like to tune their guitar different.
It's realitively the same concept.

After a while you'll get used to the idea of relative mimor or the domiant note.
It's easy refference to the root note of the scale.

I personally like to use the A string as guide to find the parent scale. For stater.
If I make a bar chord. A simple root and 5th....well, I can also use that
as my refference to the circle of fifth. It's obviouse the 4th is a whole tone
from the 5th if i want to cycle down.

Dont bother with the sharps or flats at the moment.

If a person tells me to play in whatever the who minor key
Right off the bat my index finger goes the root note. I see the aeolian mode or
relative minor.
If they tell me to play in the key of whatever maj.
The samething execpt I see the ionian, which is known as the major key.
The rest of the patterns of the neck just grows from there..
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 16, 2014,
#18
Quote by mueedbilal
But the 3 frets high will not be an E note right? It will G. Correct me if I'm wrong. Thanks btw.


That's right... the note would now be a G instead of an E... but as long as every note is shifted up 3 half steps (3 frets) it would still sound the same, only in a higher key.
#19
Quote by smc818

I personally like to use the A string as guide to find the parent scale. For stater.
If I make a bar chord. A simple root and 5th....well, I can also use that
as my refference to the circle of fifth. It's obviouse the 4th is a whole tone
from the 5th if i want to cycle down.

Dont bother with the sharps or flats at the moment.

If a person tells me to play in whatever the who minor key
Right off the bat my index finger goes the root note. I see the aeolian mode or
relative minor.
If they tell me to play in the key of whatever maj.
The samething execpt I see the ionian, which is known as the major key.
The rest of the patterns of the neck just grows from there..



I also use the A string, or the G string to find the parent scale.... I like what you wrote about seeing the Ionian mode for major and the Aeolian mode fora minor key... i'm actually just starting to learn about modes... and I get the names mixed up. I know the Ionian is I... which roman numeral would be associated with Aeolian? It would have to be either II, III, or VI I assume... and i know it's not II because that's Dorian.
#20
Be sure to post lots of questions about modes, because they are important, and we love threads about modes. Especially from beginners.
#21
Quote by innovine
Be sure to post lots of questions about modes, because they are important, and we love threads about modes. Especially from beginners.


no need to be rude... the original post may have been a beginner question but I've actually been playing quite a while, and only recently started learning about modes. If you don't like my question, just move on... there are lots of other posts here for you to be an arrogant ass in.
#22
Quote by innovine
Be sure to post lots of questions about modes, because they are important, and we love threads about modes. Especially from beginners.



Tell me what are modes, what are scales (I know they are a series of notes from which they started to where they end) what are they used for, how are they formed, why do we have alot of scales like the major minor and c major and d major what ever they are. Whats the difference between them.
#23
Quote by mueedbilal
Tell me what are modes, what are scales (I know they are a series of notes from which they started to where they end) what are they used for, how are they formed, why do we have alot of scales like the major minor and c major and d major what ever they are. Whats the difference between them.

He was being sarcastic. Stay away from modes. The other stuff you're asking is basic music theory, you can look that up anywhere.
#24
Quote by WhiskeyFace
He was being sarcastic. Stay away from modes. The other stuff you're asking is basic music theory, you can look that up anywhere.



Nah bro I really want to learn about the modes.
#25
Quote by mueedbilal
Nah bro I really want to learn about the modes.


Try asking the Internet
#27
Quote by mueedbilal
I am playing from the last 2 years now. I am a novice in guitar theory.
I want to know that, the positions of the notes is fixed on the fret board right?
Like e note can be played on the open 6th string, 12 fret 6th string, 2 fret 4th string etc.
If it is like this, then why cant I play the e note on anywhere on the fret board.
Like 3rd fret 6th string? And then I will adjust the notes ahead of it like every note
On the string will go up 3 frets. If I can do this then why do we have these fixed positions
Of the notes. Please help me. Thanks.



The positions of the notes is dependent upon how the strings are tuned. Once tuned, they are "fixed" that way until the tuning changes, then the locations of those notes change.

Your question is like me coming in and saying to you "How come a dollar isn't the same as 100 dollars? I will just call a dollar 100 and then buy that 100 dollar item with this dollar. If I can do that, why do I need 100 dollars?"

Best,

Sean