#1
Hello everyone, so i have been playing for a while now and i just started to get serious about my playing and i need some help. i am able to do riffs and most of the songs i play but i just cant do the solos. it seams like no matter how much i practice it i just don't seem to improve. my first question is how do i go about learning a faster solo. do i break it down piece by piece or what? and my second question is how do i build up the speed to play it at full speed. any tips or anything is greatly appreciated.
#2
What type of stuff are you trying to play?
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I hit 'em and they stay down
- Frank Castle
#3
You start by learning some slower solos first
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#4
i play tons of metallica and stuff like that. And i have been learning slower solos like the fade to black starting solo and the one solo. do you by any chance know any more good slower solos to help me out?
#5
I don't want to discourage you from learning solos, but honestly I feel like "learning solos" (trying to copy someone else's playing style) won't be too helpful when it comes to becoming a better guitar player and getting more serious about it.
Especially in your case where (I assume) it's not getting you to the point you want to be (playing better, faster...). Idk what solo you want to learn but you should realize: you are not the guitar player that recorded this song for the record, so why bother pretending you can play exactly like the record?
I always try to encourage people to not learn solos as they are but rather to jam along with them in the scale of the solo. And I'm not talking scale-shapes but really the notes that are in the scale.
When you just "mess around" during the solo you can still listen to what is happening. A fast shred passage? Notes ascending or descending? Try to emulate something similar. Noone cares if you can hit these 23542 notes during these 8 bars perfectly.
Slow but powerful notes? Try to figure these few notes out yourself (train your ear) because these slow passages are what people remember because they are melodies everyone can understand. Not the 23542 notes.
When you've gotten comfortable soloing anything over that song then you could start digging deeper and nailing the original solo. And then again: don't be frustrated when that ultra fast shred passage bothers you. Focus on getting the melodic parts 100% right. Then you can still play along with the song, playing the "nice" parts perfectly correct and improvise over a few bars that are difficult for you.
It's a great feeling to nail a great solo but don't lose your guitar personality over copying someone else's music. If you can play a solo perfectly -> GREAT!! If not don't get frustrated. See it as a possibility to improve YOUR guitar voice
#6
I would say try and play some Gary Moore solo's, firstly because they are often not that fast (not the bluesy stuff anyways), and that man had pretty damn magic fingers, working on getting the same kind of vibrato, phrasing and timing could really help you out when you want to do other stuff.
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#7
Quote by Reinima
I don't want to discourage you from learning solos, but honestly I feel like "learning solos" (trying to copy someone else's playing style) won't be too helpful when it comes to becoming a better guitar player and getting more serious about it.
Especially in your case where (I assume) it's not getting you to the point you want to be (playing better, faster...). Idk what solo you want to learn but you should realize: you are not the guitar player that recorded this song for the record, so why bother pretending you can play exactly like the record?
I always try to encourage people to not learn solos as they are but rather to jam along with them in the scale of the solo. And I'm not talking scale-shapes but really the notes that are in the scale.
When you just "mess around" during the solo you can still listen to what is happening. A fast shred passage? Notes ascending or descending? Try to emulate something similar. Noone cares if you can hit these 23542 notes during these 8 bars perfectly.
Slow but powerful notes? Try to figure these few notes out yourself (train your ear) because these slow passages are what people remember because they are melodies everyone can understand. Not the 23542 notes.
When you've gotten comfortable soloing anything over that song then you could start digging deeper and nailing the original solo. And then again: don't be frustrated when that ultra fast shred passage bothers you. Focus on getting the melodic parts 100% right. Then you can still play along with the song, playing the "nice" parts perfectly correct and improvise over a few bars that are difficult for you.
It's a great feeling to nail a great solo but don't lose your guitar personality over copying someone else's music. If you can play a solo perfectly -> GREAT!! If not don't get frustrated. See it as a possibility to improve YOUR guitar voice


Hey man i know what your saying but my lack of knowledge about scales or even how solos are written is holding me back. i never took lessons and i kinda just played stuff l like to listen to so i dont know much about music and how it works.
#8
If your getting serious about guitar you should learn your scales at first its going to be boring and i am still learning mine and it feels endless. If you just want to mess about and copy a solo you can but this can be just as hard and you need a good memory if its a long solo. I guess a bit of both would work i really am trying to get to a point where i can improvise and create solos its still very hard to just copy someones solo with out knowing the notes you need a good ear and i am not sure you can learn a ear to be good .
, .
#9
Quote by Reinima
I don't want to discourage you from learning solos, but honestly I feel like "learning solos" (trying to copy someone else's playing style) won't be too helpful when it comes to becoming a better guitar player and getting more serious about it.
Especially in your case where (I assume) it's not getting you to the point you want to be (playing better, faster...). Idk what solo you want to learn but you should realize: you are not the guitar player that recorded this song for the record, so why bother pretending you can play exactly like the record?
I always try to encourage people to not learn solos as they are but rather to jam along with them in the scale of the solo. And I'm not talking scale-shapes but really the notes that are in the scale.



I disagree 100% with this. Learning material from other players you like is exactly what you should be doing. You won't be copying their style for doing so, only Slash sounds like Slash and only Hendrix sounds like Hendrix. When you learn from multiple guitar players you like, that will develop your style, the combination of them all.

Learning solos is a great way to:

1) Improve your ears, which will help you develop your own ideas and help you learn new material

2) Help you find useful phrases inside of different scales, tonalities and styles. If a guy who had been playing metal all his life tried to jam along to a jazz tune it would probably not go so well, you need to learn the language from already established speakers.

3) It will develop your technique far more than if you are just "messing around".

I am not saying only to learn by learning other peoples material, you have to practice improvisation on its own aswell. But learning music by other players is one of the best things you can do, especially if you are doing it by ear.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#10
I have to agree with sickz. I have had good luck picking a tough solo, slowing it down, then start slow while you pick up the techniques. You will get faster as you practice.
However, take the time to learn what key and pattern you are working from. This will help make your own solo.
#11
Quote by ENISA
i play tons of metallica and stuff like that. And i have been learning slower solos like the fade to black starting solo and the one solo.

You need to start with some slower solo's. Fade to Black and One are good beginner ones. Practice solos slow!! It takes time to learn solos especially Kirk's. Learn first solo from Master of Puppets after that harmony part. Really good solo. Just remember it takes time to do solos, few years back it took me 20 solid days to learn Kirk's solo from Damage Inc.
Guitars:
ESP LTD EX 50 with Dimarzios
Modified MIM Fender strat with schaller floyd rose
LTD EC-1000 with EMG's
2x LTD EC 401

Amps:
Marshall JVM205h
Fender Mustang II

Other bits and pieces:
D'addario strings
TC electronic g-major 2
#12
Quote by Reinima
I don't want to discourage you from learning solos, but honestly I feel like "learning solos" (trying to copy someone else's playing style) won't be too helpful when it comes to becoming a better guitar player and getting more serious about it.
Especially in your case where (I assume) it's not getting you to the point you want to be (playing better, faster...). Idk what solo you want to learn but you should realize: you are not the guitar player that recorded this song for the record, so why bother pretending you can play exactly like the record?
I always try to encourage people to not learn solos as they are but rather to jam along with them in the scale of the solo. And I'm not talking scale-shapes but really the notes that are in the scale.
When you just "mess around" during the solo you can still listen to what is happening. A fast shred passage? Notes ascending or descending? Try to emulate something similar. Noone cares if you can hit these 23542 notes during these 8 bars perfectly.
Slow but powerful notes? Try to figure these few notes out yourself (train your ear) because these slow passages are what people remember because they are melodies everyone can understand. Not the 23542 notes.
When you've gotten comfortable soloing anything over that song then you could start digging deeper and nailing the original solo. And then again: don't be frustrated when that ultra fast shred passage bothers you. Focus on getting the melodic parts 100% right. Then you can still play along with the song, playing the "nice" parts perfectly correct and improvise over a few bars that are difficult for you.
It's a great feeling to nail a great solo but don't lose your guitar personality over copying someone else's music. If you can play a solo perfectly -> GREAT!! If not don't get frustrated. See it as a possibility to improve YOUR guitar voice


really? most of the great players and legends disagree with this. and if you want to really push yourself and study to become a great jazz player*, this method of thinking will destroy you and you won't stand a chance. what you call "guitar personality" isn't something that's innate -- it's something that's developed after years of experience playing, transcribing, writing, arranging, studying, and analyzing music. if your "guitar personality" relies on the basis of "messing around", then all you're going to be doing with the guitar is messing around.

*granted, OP isn't looking to play jazz at the present moment. however, jazz is more complex than pretty much every other style (including some classical) - so it doesn't make sense to adopt a thinking process that works for simple music but not for more complex music. it doesn't make sense to limit yourself, period.

Quote by Sickz
I disagree 100% with this. Learning material from other players you like is exactly what you should be doing. You won't be copying their style for doing so, only Slash sounds like Slash and only Hendrix sounds like Hendrix. When you learn from multiple guitar players you like, that will develop your style, the combination of them all.

Learning solos is a great way to:

1) Improve your ears, which will help you develop your own ideas and help you learn new material

2) Help you find useful phrases inside of different scales, tonalities and styles. If a guy who had been playing metal all his life tried to jam along to a jazz tune it would probably not go so well, you need to learn the language from already established speakers.

3) It will develop your technique far more than if you are just "messing around".

I am not saying only to learn by learning other peoples material, you have to practice improvisation on its own aswell. But learning music by other players is one of the best things you can do, especially if you are doing it by ear.


bingo. 100%. and learning the music of others is extremely important particularly in the beginning stages, when the musician doesn't yet have a sufficiently established knowledge of theory, of stylistic tendencies, and, in some cases, his instrument.

the only thing i disagree with in this post is that i don't think it's wise to limit yourself to studying only guitar players. study works for all instruments across all styles to find what you like, and then find ways to learn from them. that's a surefire way, taken seriously, to develop one's musicianship.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#13
Quote by AeolianWolf
really? most of the great players and legends disagree with this. and if you want to really push yourself and study to become a great jazz player*, this method of thinking will destroy you and you won't stand a chance. what you call "guitar personality" isn't something that's innate -- it's something that's developed after years of experience playing, transcribing, writing, arranging, studying, and analyzing music. if your "guitar personality" relies on the basis of "messing around", then all you're going to be doing with the guitar is messing around.

*granted, OP isn't looking to play jazz at the present moment. however, jazz is more complex than pretty much every other style (including some classical) - so it doesn't make sense to adopt a thinking process that works for simple music but not for more complex music. it doesn't make sense to limit yourself, period.


bingo. 100%. and learning the music of others is extremely important particularly in the beginning stages, when the musician doesn't yet have a sufficiently established knowledge of theory, of stylistic tendencies, and, in some cases, his instrument.

the only thing i disagree with in this post is that i don't think it's wise to limit yourself to studying only guitar players. study works for all instruments across all styles to find what you like, and then find ways to learn from them. that's a surefire way, taken seriously, to develop one's musicianship.


I fully agree, i forgot to mention that. It wasn't the number one issue i had to take up.

But yes, learning from other instruments is one of the most beneficial things you can do aswell. All instruments play notes, it's just silly to think "this phrase is exclusive you pianist, cause it was originally played on a piano". You can even take stuff from drums, like fills and rhythmic patterns. There is a video of Paul Gilbert and his drum trading of phrases and imitating eachother that is really great.

But yeah, i think the most important thing to note is to learn music. Music is the reason you started playing, and music should always be the goal.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#14
In the early stages I personally believe that learning complicated solos is a waste of time. These are solos created by professional guitarist and a new soloist is not a professional guitarist. imo it's not the optimum way to learn.

For starters you'll need to build up the motor functions for soloing in the fretting hand to play a professional piece. If you don't have the technical skills for playing a professional solo then you'll probably end up wasting a lot of time learning the solo (weeks if not months). And Once it's learned what can be done with it? you can't just sit there mashing out that same solo over and over. You could start on easier solos and work your way up to the more complicated material but it's still not optimum.

I'd personally advocate gaining the motor functions for soloing through scales and improvising and learning licks. This way you'll also learn the tones of the notes in the scale and how to actually create your own solos from scales. When the motor skills and knowledge of scales are gained then start concentrating on other players professional material. By then you'll be able to break the solo down easier, you'll probably even know some of the licks in the solo and you can take what you want from the solo and integrate it into your own improvising.


http://www.guitarhabits.com/the-5-pentatonic-scale-shapes-you-must-know/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PpHWQLx9oE&list=FLrQLTkalv4Qbn7eIabPPsDA&index=6
Last edited by kingking22 at Feb 7, 2014,
#15
Hopefully you understand music theory a little bit.
Just apply other people's licks into whatever key you want to play it in.
Most of the time the base is going to tell you what the root is. Use that to guide you.
Yes, break it down into phrasing. That's the way I learned it. otherwise I wouldn't be able to make them out.
He's showing it.... using the D as the root note.
You can change it to whatever key you want.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKBBocFl2vI

Learn the major and minor pentatonic, if you haven't.

here's a managable solo. it has some speed in it. No crazy technique or scales.
Just arpeggios. it'll help train your ears to hear arpeggios too.
He's playing in a maj key even though it sound wickage.
Straight up minor pentatonic in the box pattern , even. To finish the solo
There's tabs for it if you get lost.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yu_162rQX8w
Last edited by smc818 at Feb 7, 2014,
#16
Quote by kingking22
In the early stages I personally believe that learning complicated solos is a waste of time. These are solos created by professional guitarist and a new soloist is not a professional guitarist. imo it's not the optimum way to learn.

For starters you'll need to build up the motor functions for soloing in the fretting hand to play a professional piece. If you don't have the technical skills for playing a professional solo then you'll probably end up wasting a lot of time learning the solo (weeks if not months). And Once it's learned what can be done with it? you can't just sit there mashing out that same solo over and over. You could start on easier solos and work your way up to the more complicated material but it's still not optimum.

I'd personally advocate gaining the motor functions for soloing through scales and improvising and learning licks. This way you'll also learn the tones of the notes in the scale and how to actually create your own solos from scales. When the motor skills and knowledge of scales are gained then start concentrating on other players professional material. By then you'll be able to break the solo down easier, you'll probably even know some of the licks in the solo and you can take what you want from the solo and integrate it into your own improvising.


http://www.guitarhabits.com/the-5-pentatonic-scale-shapes-you-must-know/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PpHWQLx9oE&list=FLrQLTkalv4Qbn7eIabPPsDA&index=6



Professional just means they are paid to do it as a primary source of income. There are many professional guitar players who are not very good and there are many non-professional guitar players who can tear it up. So I wouldn't worry about that. What I would do is find solos that are appropriate to your talent level and learn those. In other words, if you can't pick straight 32nd notes don't try to learn a solo that is full of alternate picked 32nd notes.

That said, don't avoid working on stuff that is above your level. Just divide your practice time so you know what you are trying to accomplish. Practicing technique, learning a solo, improvisation. They are all different tasks to accomplish and they are never-ending.

Last, developing your own sound/style is an always evolving thing. Leaning a solo won't prevent this. It will also allow you to learn some phrasing and approaches of different guitar players. Take the pieces you like, discard the ones you don't. As you mature as a player your phrasing will naturally evolve.