#1
So how many experienced players can name the notes they are playing? Like for instance, without a guitar in your hand, can you name the notes in a Bm or D#add6? What's the sus4 in G#? what's the fourth in a C# minor? What sharps or flats are there in F?
I know these by shape, but I'd need to visualize a fretboard to say the exact note names. It just has always seemed easiest to move things around by shape, but now that I'm learning a bit of theory and lead I am wondering if this is something I should have learned by rote?
#2
its easy, just learn about intervals and you wont need the guitar.
#3
Quote by Ignore
its easy, just learn about intervals and you wont need the guitar.

Yep. It's really quite simple. It just involves a lot of memorization. It's easier to visualize the theory on a piano keyboard in my opinion.
#4
Quote by Ignore
its easy, just learn about intervals and you wont need the guitar.


Yes, I know the intervals. The question is do you calculate the intervals to find out the note name, or can you just say offhand without thinking or working it out?
#5
one thing helps the other, You can study keys by themselves and the notes contained in them. Or just play and analyze music and while all of this is going on it automatically makes you learn them.
#6
nothing wrong with visualization. though i've also heard that visualizing it on a piano is easier. i do that naturally because piano was my first instrument.

when you have to recall the note names really quickly, you're probably in the middle of improvisation or something...which means you have to know how it translates to the fretboard anyway. outside of that, what's the point of being able to list off the notes in a random chord that quickly?
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#7
Quote by innovine
Yes, I know the intervals. The question is do you calculate the intervals to find out the note name, or can you just say offhand without thinking or working it out?

Most people get fast enough at calculating the intervals that it doesn't matter.
#8
Quote by innovine
So how many experienced players can name the notes they are playing? Like for instance, without a guitar in your hand, can you name the notes in a Bm or D#add6? What's the sus4 in G#? what's the fourth in a C# minor? What sharps or flats are there in F?
I know these by shape, but I'd need to visualize a fretboard to say the exact note names. It just has always seemed easiest to move things around by shape, but now that I'm learning a bit of theory and lead I am wondering if this is something I should have learned by rote?


I can do that. I can do all of these, pretty much instantly without much effort or thought. If you're interested in a live demo, or if someone wants to see a demo, PM me, and maybe we can figure out a way, and I can answer questions you might have. Assuming that you're asking because you want to know how.

Bm is B D F#

D# add 6 - that's a funny one since you don't have to add a 6, you usually add past a 7 or omitting the 7th. But that said:

D# Fx A# B#

G# sus 4 - G# C# D#

In C# Minor the 4th is a Fx

There's one flat in F (no sharps". its a Bb

I use the same method, that I teach through my school to do this. I don't know how long it takes people outside (by rote), but I would think a long, long time to do it instantly. Takes only a few lessons with us to achieve the same results.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jan 20, 2014,
#9
When I was first learning my teacher wrote down all the notes on cards and on the other side wrote down the major chord tones of that note. For minor chords I simply flatted the third. I had them down in a week. Never forgot them either, I use them everyday though so that could be why.
#10
Quote by macashmack
When I was first learning my teacher wrote down all the notes on cards and on the other side wrote down the major chord tones of that note. For minor chords I simply flatted the third. I had them down in a week. Never forgot them either, I use them everyday though so that could be why.


You make a very good point there - its something that, if you don't use, its easy to lose. Applying this information and self challenge is a great way to keep that skill set polished!

Best,

Sean
#11
I learned quite a bit of theory when I younger and played piano and trumpet for years and studied two semesters of music theory in college. For me that was a long time ago. I can work out any question on theory within a few seconds time if I have to but I have never connected my actual guiatr playing to any theory. I often wished I did because I know I would play much better but those two things seem to exist for me in different parts of my brain and don't talk to one another. If someone asks me to play in a certain key I can just play without thinking about the theory end of it and I'm OK. If someone wants to know why I played this diminished chord in that song I could think about it and uncover the theory behind it but it I really played it because I just knew that it would work well in this key. I agree with some of the other comments above: When it comes to explaining any music theory I am ususlly thinking in terms of a piano keyboard even though my main instrument is guitar.

I'm like the old jazz musician who arrived at a recording session and the snotty music arranger hands him some sheet music and said "I'm assuming you can read music?" The musician replied "Yes, but not enough to let it affect my playing any".